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Old 10-10-2017, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,919 posts, read 6,850,118 times
Reputation: 5841

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Well that doesn't make sense because Miami's record low is 27 and coconuts grow like weeds. In fact Miami reaches 44 almost every year as a guarantee. Something else must be messing with the fruits down there.
Miami's averages are higher than Hamilton's year round, that offsets the lower record low. And when was the last time that the official station dropped below freezing anyways? 50 years ago? 100 years ago?
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Old 10-10-2017, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Lil Rhodey
679 posts, read 463,183 times
Reputation: 938
Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
Ugh, I love Summer weather but this heat through all of September and October is just exhausting. Iím over it. Yesterday was 80 degrees and 98% humidity in NY. Today is even warmer but less humid and muggy at least. I took my A/C unit out of my window about a week or 2 ago and that was a huge mistake.
Same here in Providence. Thankfully I still have my ac in my bedroom.... gonna leave it in a little longer because it's going to warm up again
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Old 10-10-2017, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,053 posts, read 3,379,100 times
Reputation: 7690
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Miami's averages are higher than Hamilton's year round, that offsets the lower record low. And when was the last time that the official station dropped below freezing anyways? 50 years ago? 100 years ago?

Try 7 years ago. We had freezes and frosts in January and December 2010. Also freeze in 1989 I believe. It's rare but not a half a century thing. We also had snow in 1977 and reports of flurries in 2010. 1977 wasn't even 50 years ago.
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Old 10-10-2017, 11:10 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,277,997 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Lol okay. Coconuts will cure everything! -.- I am from Miami which grows coconuts and has the climate you describe. Guess what? We still have obesity and diabetes down there and contrary to your own popular belief, coconut is not a big part of the average diet in South Florida. Also South Florida still can get tornadoes and hail. And I would take tornadoes and ice storms way before hurricanes anyway.
Obesity rates in your former state are by far the lowest out of all the Southern states. In fact, rates are even lower than those of Washington and Oregon, two very hardcore granola outdoorsy liberal states. And it's pretty clear why; minimization of freezes allows maximal display of what a humid climate giveth. This presents not only in the form of ability to cultivate many tender crops that are good for the body, but also sustenance of water warmth for year-round recreation, and the many hot stars and models that flock there wanting to be part of that:
https://stateofobesity.org/adult-obesity/

True that tornadoes and hail still can happen there, but they never are the truly significant, newsworthy events as seen in northern Mississippi, and other "Dixie Alley" areas. Then again, South Florida isn't quite "perfect" in regards to having appropriate avoidance of winter cold for the latitude, since it has seen freezing weather despite the tropical climate; eliminate the cold snaps (via east-west mountains across the country, or replacing north Canada with ocean), and South Florida would become a more solid tropical climate. This wipes out the hail, and minimizes the tornado threat to weak tropical waterspouts.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Why would the Louisiana bayou need to look like Florida's mangrove swamps? It's fine the way it is. You are now talking about changing Cajun food and thems fighting words!

Why in the world would anyone want a jungle in Texas? Eastern Texas is humid enough it doesn't need to feel like the Amazon on top of it. We got enough rattle snakes in Texas and now you wanna add boa constrictors? Spider monkeys? Isn't George W. Bush enough? I like Texas with it's rolling hills of oak and mesquite and spring time bluebonnets. Its hot enough down there we don't need it to be a jungle. The South is already a sauna in the summer it doesn't need to be sweltering year around. I think loblolly pines, bald cypress and southern live oaks are beautiful enough.
Just thought those features could spice things up. I'll give you this: that part about GWB was gold.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Btw Miami has worse mosquitoes than anywhere I have lived in Texas. In Texas the colder weather kills mosquitoes. In Miami the slightly drier sometimes cool weather only decreases them a bit. They're still persistent for pretty much the whole year. Your theories are nonsense.
The key to eliminating mosquitoes is by eliminating their breeding spots, which happen to be standing fresh water. The South Florida dry season features very low rainfall, along with warm temps, which would help to evaporate the water, and destroy their larvae.
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Old 10-11-2017, 07:21 AM
 
377 posts, read 201,887 times
Reputation: 349
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Well that doesn't make sense because Miami's record low is 27 and coconuts grow like weeds. In fact Miami reaches 44 almost every year as a guarantee. Something else must be messing with the fruits down there.
It makes perfect sense. You just need to use your brain a little bit. Which would be more dangerous for you? If I strip you naked and put you in a 25F freezer for 30 minutes or if I strip you naked and put you in a refrigerator at 45F for 2 days? Plants are much the same way, even very cold temperatures won't damage them provided they're temporary.

Coconut palms need a daily mean of 70 degrees, at least, to be healthy. A daily mean of below 60 degrees and they begin to die. While Bermuda does not have an (average) daily mean below 60 degrees, which explains why there are coconut palms there, in contrast it has 5 months of the year with a daily mean below 70 degrees, which explains why none of the coconut trees actually produce coconuts. They're not healthy.

In Miami, the daily mean is above 70 degrees for 11 months of the year. For the one month it's not above 70 degrees (January) it's fairly close at 68 degrees. This explains why Miami's coconut trees produce fruits, though I still say Miami's climate is not ideal for coconuts. It's still chilly for them which is why they tend not to be very tall compared to other parts of the world.

Lastly, it's not guaranteed that Miami reaches 44 degrees every year. Using weather data from the official weather station (MIA airport), so far in 2017 the coldest temperature reached in Miami has been 51F. In 2016, the coldest temperature reached has been 46 degrees. It's back in 2015 where you're right (42 degrees). The mean minimum of Miami in January is 43 degrees. Meaning the coldest temperature reached every year, on average over decades of data, is 43 degrees so around 50% of the years Miami stays above 44 degrees.
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Old 10-11-2017, 07:25 AM
 
377 posts, read 201,887 times
Reputation: 349
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Try 7 years ago. We had freezes and frosts in January and December 2010. Also freeze in 1989 I believe. It's rare but not a half a century thing. We also had snow in 1977 and reports of flurries in 2010. 1977 wasn't even 50 years ago.
Officially in 2010 the coldest temperature recorded at MIA airport was 35 degrees. This would be a frost but not a freeze. You have to go back decades to get a true freeze (32 degrees).

But, these temperatures whether 35 degrees or 32 degrees or 40 degrees, are absolutely destructive for coconut palms. What works in Miami's favor is that these temperatures tend to only happen over several hours at the early morning before the sun begins warming things up. So the tree's manage to survive, some of them. I'm sure in 2010 there were many trees that succumbed, especially recently planted ones.
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Old 10-11-2017, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,053 posts, read 3,379,100 times
Reputation: 7690
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
Officially in 2010 the coldest temperature recorded at MIA airport was 35 degrees. This would be a frost but not a freeze. You have to go back decades to get a true freeze (32 degrees).

But, these temperatures whether 35 degrees or 32 degrees or 40 degrees, are absolutely destructive for coconut palms. What works in Miami's favor is that these temperatures tend to only happen over several hours at the early morning before the sun begins warming things up. So the tree's manage to survive, some of them. I'm sure in 2010 there were many trees that succumbed, especially recently planted ones.
The airport only tells part of the story. Other areas of the city/suburbs certainly saw freezing temperatures. A frost would still be damaging enough to coconut trees but yes, for only a short amount of time and to a healthy mature tree, effects won't be fatal.
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Old 10-11-2017, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,053 posts, read 3,379,100 times
Reputation: 7690
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
Obesity rates in your former state are by far the lowest out of all the Southern states. In fact, rates are even lower than those of Washington and Oregon, two very hardcore granola outdoorsy liberal states. And it's pretty clear why; minimization of freezes allows maximal display of what a humid climate giveth. This presents not only in the form of ability to cultivate many tender crops that are good for the body, but also sustenance of water warmth for year-round recreation, and the many hot stars and models that flock there wanting to be part of that:
https://stateofobesity.org/adult-obesity/

True that tornadoes and hail still can happen there, but they never are the truly significant, newsworthy events as seen in northern Mississippi, and other "Dixie Alley" areas. Then again, South Florida isn't quite "perfect" in regards to having appropriate avoidance of winter cold for the latitude, since it has seen freezing weather despite the tropical climate; eliminate the cold snaps (via east-west mountains across the country, or replacing north Canada with ocean), and South Florida would become a more solid tropical climate. This wipes out the hail, and minimizes the tornado threat to weak tropical waterspouts.




Just thought those features could spice things up. I'll give you this: that part about GWB was gold.



The key to eliminating mosquitoes is by eliminating their breeding spots, which happen to be standing fresh water. The South Florida dry season features very low rainfall, along with warm temps, which would help to evaporate the water, and destroy their larvae.
Florida's obesity rate has nothing to do with coconuts. We don't spend every week having a good coconut meal. I would think the obsession with "bikini bodies" and a stronger "gym culture" has more to do with that than coconuts.
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Old 10-11-2017, 12:15 PM
 
10,058 posts, read 4,651,831 times
Reputation: 15280
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
Just out of curiosity, why not Indonesia? It's wetter (in areas) and more consistently warm than Vietnam.
soil type? it isnt only about water and sun...

people who dont like seasons seem to be the ones who experience it most and take it for granted... dumb entitled people think they can see snow in the winter and sun in the summer, leaves in the spring and fall. no need to make travel plans to see it change seasons
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Old 10-11-2017, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,053 posts, read 3,379,100 times
Reputation: 7690
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
It makes perfect sense. You just need to use your brain a little bit. Which would be more dangerous for you? If I strip you naked and put you in a 25F freezer for 30 minutes or if I strip you naked and put you in a refrigerator at 45F for 2 days? Plants are much the same way, even very cold temperatures won't damage them provided they're temporary.

Coconut palms need a daily mean of 70 degrees, at least, to be healthy. A daily mean of below 60 degrees and they begin to die. While Bermuda does not have an (average) daily mean below 60 degrees, which explains why there are coconut palms there, in contrast it has 5 months of the year with a daily mean below 70 degrees, which explains why none of the coconut trees actually produce coconuts. They're not healthy.

In Miami, the daily mean is above 70 degrees for 11 months of the year. For the one month it's not above 70 degrees (January) it's fairly close at 68 degrees. This explains why Miami's coconut trees produce fruits, though I still say Miami's climate is not ideal for coconuts. It's still chilly for them which is why they tend not to be very tall compared to other parts of the world.

Lastly, it's not guaranteed that Miami reaches 44 degrees every year. Using weather data from the official weather station (MIA airport), so far in 2017 the coldest temperature reached in Miami has been 51F. In 2016, the coldest temperature reached has been 46 degrees. It's back in 2015 where you're right (42 degrees). The mean minimum of Miami in January is 43 degrees. Meaning the coldest temperature reached every year, on average over decades of data, is 43 degrees so around 50% of the years Miami stays above 44 degrees.
It's not guaranteed but it almost is. It reaches the 40s almost every winter thats for sure. However the past few winters have been really mild even for Miami standards. I remember many times in December even, it getting down to the 40s. It typically only lasts for the morning. Also I know it got down to the high 30s in February 2015 because I remember a conversation with my dad and he showed me the temperature down there was about 37-39 and he asked how cold it was in Texas.. and he was flabbergasted when I said it was 70.
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