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Old 10-12-2017, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,400,744 times
Reputation: 2089

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
If you've ever lived in a location with just two or three seasons (I have), then I would guess you'd appreciate 4 seasons even more than you do - gray skies and all.
I think going through winter makes spring and summer more enjoyable. Winter can drag on in Ohio. Columbus doesn't get as bitterly cold as the northern Midwest or a lot of snow but the gray skies can last until April which does get a little old.
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Old 10-12-2017, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,852 posts, read 7,797,618 times
Reputation: 9469
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
I think going through winter makes spring and summer more enjoyable. Winter can drag on in Ohio. Columbus doesn't get as bitterly cold as the northern Midwest or a lot of snow but the gray skies can last until April which does get a little old.
We moved to Philly from Houston. I like each of the seasons. If anything, summer comes in 4th on my list - the heat waves make it uncomfortable to run around and explore the city. Fortunately summer here is not a 6 month endurance test as it is in Houston and it comes and goes in waves in Philly. I like being back where deciduous trees lose their leaves and everything goes dormant. It is a time for warm woolen coats, insulated gloves and stocking caps with nights in the theatre and in cozy little restaurants. Snow only makes it that much better.

There will no doubt be posters who donít believe me. I donít know why it is beyond comprehension that there are people who really enjoy winter, but I donít care if they donít get it.
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Old 10-12-2017, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,856,300 times
Reputation: 5855
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
We moved to Philly from Houston. I like each of the seasons. If anything, summer comes in 4th on my list - the heat waves make it uncomfortable to run around and explore the city. Fortunately summer here is not a 6 month endurance test as it is in Houston and it comes and goes in waves in Philly. I like being back where deciduous trees lose their leaves and everything goes dormant. It is a time for warm woolen coats, insulated gloves and stocking caps with nights in the theatre and in cozy little restaurants. Snow only makes it that much better.

There will no doubt be posters who donít believe me. I donít know why it is beyond comprehension that there are people who really enjoy winter, but I donít care if they donít get it.
I know there are people who enjoy it, but after growing up on the East Coast and hating snow and ice, I had to leave. Much better out west for me anyways, I saw enough snow growing up to last 3 lifetimes
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Old 10-12-2017, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Colorado
390 posts, read 231,559 times
Reputation: 710
I would guess climate is more important to some people that it is others. I don't care for long periods of extreme cold but welcome short periods as it gets rid of weeds and bugs, and freshens things up a bit. In the south west there is not enough moisture of those things to thrive. Back east there is plenty of moisture and cold spells keep them in check.
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Old 10-13-2017, 06:40 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,852 posts, read 7,797,618 times
Reputation: 9469
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
I know there are people who enjoy it, but after growing up on the East Coast and hating snow and ice, I had to leave. Much better out west for me anyways, I saw enough snow growing up to last 3 lifetimes
I understand. I left the east coast in my 20s because I wanted to try something different. It was fun and I enjoyed all of it, including my 26 years in Houston. But during that time, just as Houston provided me with experiences I couldnít get back east, I came to see that there were things I missed about the east coast (4 seasons being one of them). Eventually the balance tipped and I was fortunate enough to have the means to move to the city I love: Philadelphia.

Have fun in Arizona. Itís a beautiful state.
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Old 10-13-2017, 06:49 AM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,278,751 times
Reputation: 1386
The issues with insects in warm climates is actually more of a moot point than people realize. While there are indeed more insects around with high heat and humidity, there is also greater diversity in the insectivores (i.e. spiders, centipedes, bats, anteaters, etc) that keep populations in check. Furthermore, most bugs in warm climates are specialized more to niches in their ecosystem; they aren't the type that become household pests.
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Old 10-13-2017, 08:13 AM
 
6,483 posts, read 4,069,179 times
Reputation: 16747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
The issues with insects in warm climates is actually more of a moot point than people realize. While there are indeed more insects around with high heat and humidity, there is also greater diversity in the insectivores (i.e. spiders, centipedes, bats, anteaters, etc) that keep populations in check.
I wish I had a nickel for every guest from Georgia, Virginia, South Carolina, etc. who has sat out on my porch on a pleasant summer evening in SoCal and said, "It's so great to sit outside without being eaten alive!"
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Old 10-13-2017, 10:46 AM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,278,751 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I wish I had a nickel for every guest from Georgia, Virginia, South Carolina, etc. who has sat out on my porch on a pleasant summer evening in SoCal and said, "It's so great to sit outside without being eaten alive!"
No certainly the bugs exist, as I can attest, but the presence isn't as overwhelming as people make it out to be. Then again, I don't have the irrational phobia of bugs like many people seem to have.
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Old 10-13-2017, 12:43 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,728,729 times
Reputation: 30796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
The issues with insects in warm climates is actually more of a moot point than people realize. While there are indeed more insects around with high heat and humidity, there is also greater diversity in the insectivores (i.e. spiders, centipedes, bats, anteaters, etc) that keep populations in check. Furthermore, most bugs in warm climates are specialized more to niches in their ecosystem; they aren't the type that become household pests.
I have no problem in general with bugs. I even camp out tentless with all kinds of creepy crawlies around, spiders walking past my head and such.

But I live in the city, and in the city, there are roaches. I have a visceral reaction just at the sight of them and thankfully here in New Mexico it gets cold enough to kill the buggers off for 6-7 months of the year.
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Old 10-13-2017, 12:54 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,808 posts, read 1,299,023 times
Reputation: 3204
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
No certainly the bugs exist, as I can attest, but the presence isn't as overwhelming as people make it out to be. Then again, I don't have the irrational phobia of bugs like many people seem to have.
Idk, my bug bitten legs would argue that they are pretty bad down here. I don't like wearing long pants when It's muggy and in the high 80s at night but you pretty much have to. Everyone from a drier or more northern climate who I went to College in Texas with me would agree that the bugs suck in the south. Even in MN with all it's lakes and the reputation for misquotes being the state bird there is a much shorter season. We are half way through October and I'm still getting eaten alive.
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