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Old 10-15-2017, 12:56 AM
 
377 posts, read 202,011 times
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Biting bugs like mosquitoes are not necessarily a function of heat and humidity. A lot of the south pacific islands are completely mosquito free (some have them however).

Whereas, in Alaska, you will be eaten alive by mosquitoes.

It's true that mosquitoes will be killed during the winter, but even in places with short growing seasons like Alaska, mosquitoes can thrive in the summer.
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Old 10-15-2017, 01:05 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,856,300 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
Biting bugs like mosquitoes are not necessarily a function of heat and humidity. A lot of the south pacific islands are completely mosquito free (some have them however).

Whereas, in Alaska, you will be eaten alive by mosquitoes.

It's true that mosquitoes will be killed during the winter, but even in places with short growing seasons like Alaska, mosquitoes can thrive in the summer.
What does it in Alaska is all the standing water during late Spring and Summer. Most of Alaska is in a permafrost zone, so the deep layers of soil are frozen year round. But the top layers will thaw from May to August. This creates swampy land known locally as Muskeg. As summer is also the wet season in the subarctic, all that rain that falls combined with low evaporation rate, can't completely drain down.

In conclusion, the Muskeg of the subarctic zone, like the Subtropical bayous and tropical mangroves is a perfect breeding ground for mosquitoes; lots of standing water.
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Old 10-16-2017, 07:19 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,381,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
The issues with insects in warm climates is actually more of a moot point than people realize. While there are indeed more insects around with high heat and humidity, there is also greater diversity in the insectivores (i.e. spiders, centipedes, bats, anteaters, etc) that keep populations in check. Furthermore, most bugs in warm climates are specialized more to niches in their ecosystem; they aren't the type that become household pests.
Lol that's like saying "This place may have more crime, but at least it has more cops to deal with crime so its like a moot point!!!" Also.. its not about just insects, its about bugs.. and centipedes and spiders are bugs. Btw I don't care about bugs but I HATE lizards. Whenever I visit Florida I'm wary about all the geckos and anoles running around. Hate those things.
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Old 10-16-2017, 08:01 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,278,751 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Lol that's like saying "This place may have more crime, but at least it has more cops to deal with crime so its like a moot point!!!"
Precisely. In both cases, limiting factors neutralize the perceived increased threat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Also.. its not about just insects, its about bugs.. and centipedes and spiders are bugs. Btw I don't care about bugs but I HATE lizards. Whenever I visit Florida I'm wary about all the geckos and anoles running around. Hate those things.
Spiders and centipedes aren't bugs, neither are most insects; that term is reserved for a specific order of insects:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemiptera

Spiders, centipedes and lizards are just some of many insectivores that help control the insect pests people complain the most about (i.e. mosquitoes, cockroaches etc).
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Old 10-16-2017, 09:52 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,808 posts, read 1,299,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
Biting bugs like mosquitoes are not necessarily a function of heat and humidity. A lot of the south pacific islands are completely mosquito free (some have them however).

Whereas, in Alaska, you will be eaten alive by mosquitoes.

It's true that mosquitoes will be killed during the winter, but even in places with short growing seasons like Alaska, mosquitoes can thrive in the summer.
Yeah when I worked in Alaska, the mosquitoes were bad in the summer, but there is a much shorter period that you get eaten alive than the south.
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Old 10-17-2017, 05:55 AM
 
377 posts, read 202,011 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
Yeah when I worked in Alaska, the mosquitoes were bad in the summer, but there is a much shorter period that you get eaten alive than the south.
Yes, technically thats true. But in Alaska you're not going to be sitting outside on your front porch sipping a beer when its January. The summer is all you have and the mosquitoes are nastier in the summer there than anywhere else I've been.

I read (while researching this lol) that mosquitoes in Alaska need to feed more so they can survive the winter. So each bite they take, they draw more ml of blood and they're in a feeding frenzy mode that tropical mosquitoes simply aren't in.
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Old 10-17-2017, 08:14 AM
 
6,483 posts, read 4,069,179 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
Spiders and centipedes aren't bugs, neither are most insects; that term is reserved for a specific order of insects:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemiptera

Spiders, centipedes and lizards are just some of many insectivores that help control the insect pests people complain the most about (i.e. mosquitoes, cockroaches etc).
Oh please. Don't pretend you don't know what people mean when they say "bugs." Unless you've never called a mosquito, an ant, or a cockroach a "bug," you have no right to play the semantics card. This is as obnoxious as correcting people when they call tomatoes, cucumbers, or squash vegetables.

Even entomologists tend to call Hemiptera "true bugs" to avoid confusion.

I personally am not bothered by centipedes, and I love spiders and lizards, but I do understand why people don't want them in the house. And I sympathize with anyone who lives in a hot, humid climate and is pestered by mosquitoes and other bugs when they go outside.
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Old 10-17-2017, 09:17 AM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,278,751 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Oh please. Don't pretend you don't know what people mean when they say "bugs." Unless you've never called a mosquito, an ant, or a cockroach a "bug," you have no right to play the semantics card. This is as obnoxious as correcting people when they call tomatoes, cucumbers, or squash vegetables.

Even entomologists tend to call Hemiptera "true bugs" to avoid confusion.

I personally am not bothered by centipedes, and I love spiders and lizards, but I do understand why people don't want them in the house. And I sympathize with anyone who lives in a hot, humid climate and is pestered by mosquitoes and other bugs when they go outside.
No need to. Hot, humid climates tend to have many types of insectivores (centipedes, spiders, lizards, bats, anteaters, etc) specialized in keeping the "bug" population in check.
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Old 10-17-2017, 10:13 AM
 
6,483 posts, read 4,069,179 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
And I sympathize with anyone who lives in a hot, humid climate and is pestered by mosquitoes and other bugs when they go outside.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
No need to. Hot, humid climates tend to have many types of insectivores (centipedes, spiders, lizards, bats, anteaters, etc) specialized in keeping the "bug" population in check.
Oh. I get it. Places with a high population of predators that eat bugs don't have lots of bugs.

And I like to go to the beach when it's crowded. When it's crowded, everyone else stays away.
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Old 10-17-2017, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,381,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
No need to. Hot, humid climates tend to have many types of insectivores (centipedes, spiders, lizards, bats, anteaters, etc) specialized in keeping the "bug" population in check.
Funny, yet my old house in Florida had a nasty roach infestation. Roaches that were bigger than half the lizards. So much for "not many bugs." Don't get me started on mosquitoes. And we had no shortage of those nasty lizards, either!

And why are you bringing up ant eaters, a South American animal, in a forum about the US? If you wanna further your argument at least use animals that actually live in the US!
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