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Old 10-17-2017, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,381,283 times
Reputation: 7704

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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Oh. I get it. Places with a high population of predators that eat bugs don't have lots of bugs.

And I like to go to the beach when it's crowded. When it's crowded, everyone else stays away.
It's a paradox, really! These places have so many bugs but they have so many predators that .. they don't have a lot of bugs? Yet there's plenty of predators with a food supply? Yeaa makes perfect sense! -.-

I think he also forgets that we have insectivores up north too. We have frogs, birds, dragonflies, spiders etc. sooooo what's the argument again? Lol
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Old 10-17-2017, 04:31 PM
 
Location: 352
5,122 posts, read 3,880,627 times
Reputation: 3491
Quote:
Originally Posted by tman7117 View Post
Not to say that it's wrong to like a change of seasons, but I personally don't see why people like it so much.
Living in the New York metro area, an area that gets 4 very distinct seasons, I can't stand it. Especially the change from summer to fall when it's that awkward point in late September/October and you don't know what to where because it's 40 degrees in the morning and 75 by 1 in the afternoon. Don't even get me started on winter. I'd rather have a year long summer/warm climate like So.Cal or Texas/Florida

Anyone else feel this way?
I can see the Socal argument, but Texas?? Yeah, no. I personally like having seasons because it brings variety and refreshment. Right now it's 66 which is so refreshing after months of heat and humidity. But I wouldn't really want 66 all year long. Eventually I'll get sick of the cool and cold and start praying for 80s again, and they'll come. But I wouldn't that all year either because getting in a hot car is tedious.

And even in a place like LA, it may not be 40 in the morning and 75 during the day extreme, but it's not exactly 75 degrees for 24 hours either. LA's high today was 91 and low 69. Plus LA's temp can really vary between Santa Monica, LA proper, to Burbank to Riverside. SoCal isn't one large slice of 75 degree everyday pie.
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Old 10-17-2017, 05:09 PM
 
Location: 'greater' Buffalo, NY
3,067 posts, read 2,106,888 times
Reputation: 3965
Quote:
Originally Posted by James Bond 007 View Post
I'm afraid you don't really understand - ABQConvict is correct: People who move to 4-season climates usually *really do* like the 4 seasons. Personally I LOVE snow, I do not "say" I love snow merely as a "coping mechanism," I genuinely love it. And cold weather, too (I'm quite cold tolerant). Then when summer comes around the hot muggy weather and thunderstorms here in the Midwest have their own appeal. But in both cases the appeal wears off after a few months and a desire for relief arises. Too much of anything, no matter how good, gets tired after a while.
You're speaking for yourself. 'Usually' is quite a stretch, from my experience. Note my location. I do, however, mostly have experience with natives/lifers, as Buffalo doesn't have much in-migration
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Old 10-17-2017, 06:28 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,278,751 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Oh. I get it. Places with a high population of predators that eat bugs don't have lots of bugs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
It's a paradox, really! These places have so many bugs but they have so many predators that .. they don't have a lot of bugs? Yet there's plenty of predators with a food supply? Yeaa makes perfect sense! -.-
You both still aren't getting it. I never said that there wouldn't be "bugs," just that they really aren't as problematic as people have been suggesting; the plentiful predators are a key factor in that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Funny, yet my old house in Florida had a nasty roach infestation. Roaches that were bigger than half the lizards. So much for "not many bugs." Don't get me started on mosquitoes. And we had no shortage of those nasty lizards, either!
Infestations are cyclic and variable: it's possible for one house to be affected, while most others down the street are perfectly fine. Seen it first hand across Gulf Coast Texas, and the rest of the South.

Funny enough, insect infestations may actually be more perceived up North than down South, and that is because of winter (not in-spite). The frigid outdoor temperatures ensure that houses end up as the islands of suitable warmth for those pests.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
And why are you bringing up ant eaters, a South American animal, in a forum about the US? If you wanna further your argument at least use animals that actually live in the US!
The Southern US wasn't specified, as the poster said "hot, humid climates" in general. Either way, there are more than enough insectivores living in the region to do the job.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
I think he also forgets that we have insectivores up north too. We have frogs, birds, dragonflies, spiders etc. sooooo what's the argument again? Lol
The North certainly has insectivores, yes. It's just that the South has more, both in diversity of species, as well as populations of said species.
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Old 10-18-2017, 10:05 AM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,808 posts, read 1,299,023 times
Reputation: 3204
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
You both still aren't getting it. I never said that there wouldn't be "bugs," just that they really aren't as problematic as people have been suggesting; the plentiful predators are a key factor in that.



Infestations are cyclic and variable: it's possible for one house to be affected, while most others down the street are perfectly fine. Seen it first hand across Gulf Coast Texas, and the rest of the South.

Funny enough, insect infestations may actually be more perceived up North than down South, and that is because of winter (not in-spite). The frigid outdoor temperatures ensure that houses end up as the islands of suitable warmth for those pests.



The Southern US wasn't specified, as the poster said "hot, humid climates" in general. Either way, there are more than enough insectivores living in the region to do the job.



The North certainly has insectivores, yes. It's just that the South has more, both in diversity of species, as well as populations of said species.
Yeah there may be more insectivores, but that is because there are more pests in the south. This isn't a zero sum game, I'm sorry. I like plenty of things about the south but you can't convince me the bugs arn't terrible compared to the cooler north or drier west.

I have never met a single person from the north or west who said, "gee, the bugs arn't that bad down here, thanks insectivores!" I remember when I was in college pretty much every single out of state kid who wasn't from the south would comment on the number of pests.

Every single place I have lived in DFW has had roaches except for when I lived on the 3th floor of a building in Uptown. The southern roaches are so much bigger and nastier than the northern ones. Out west they aren't even a thing. I got eaten alive just yesterday around dusk, because even though we have had cooler weather it hasn't been sustained enough to kill said pests. You don't get than this time of year in cooler or drier climates.

Yeah, during the transitional part of the fall you do have pests that try to come inside, but that is a short period. Up north that time has come and gone already and they are enjoying crisp fall days.
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Old 10-18-2017, 10:21 AM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,278,751 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
Yeah there may be more insectivores, but that is because there are more pests in the south. This isn't a zero sum game, I'm sorry. I like plenty of things about the south but you can't convince me the bugs arn't terrible compared to the cooler north or drier west.
If anything, it's a negative sum game, against the North, considering how aggressive insects have to be to get it all out (breeding, mating, etc), given shorter summers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
Yeah, during the transitional part of the fall you do have pests that try to come inside, but that is a short period. Up north that time has come and gone already and they are enjoying crisp fall days.
Meanwhile, the insects, finding the northern outdoor temperatures too cool for their survival, congregate to the only warm sources they can find: houses, warmed by winter heaters. Think about it.
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Old 10-18-2017, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,381,283 times
Reputation: 7704
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
You both still aren't getting it. I never said that there wouldn't be "bugs," just that they really aren't as problematic as people have been suggesting; the plentiful predators are a key factor in that.



Infestations are cyclic and variable: it's possible for one house to be affected, while most others down the street are perfectly fine. Seen it first hand across Gulf Coast Texas, and the rest of the South.

Funny enough, insect infestations may actually be more perceived up North than down South, and that is because of winter (not in-spite). The frigid outdoor temperatures ensure that houses end up as the islands of suitable warmth for those pests.



The Southern US wasn't specified, as the poster said "hot, humid climates" in general. Either way, there are more than enough insectivores living in the region to do the job.



The North certainly has insectivores, yes. It's just that the South has more, both in diversity of species, as well as populations of said species.

The South has more insectivores because they have more insects. Doy!!! The roach infestation happened because they nested under the floor. Yes, you can also have bug infestations up north. But you also don't have mosquitoes outside for 9 months of the year. I've yet to see a cockroach in Minnesota, though. Hell, I rarely saw any in Texas.

This is a US forum not a weather forum so lets not get off topic with animals native to other continents. Also, even in South America, I don't think you'll find anteaters walking around a Colombian city. Fire ants, which are invasive in the South, suck. We have no anteaters to eat them. They make tasks like mowing the lawn more miserable than they already are. We don't have fire ants this far north.

What's so great about having so many insectivores anyway when

A. The insects GREATLY outnumber them anyway. Having more insectivores doesn't mean I'll hardly be bitten by mosquitoes.

B. A lot of the insectivores are considered "unpleasant" by the general population. People tend to not like bats, spiders, lizards or frogs especially in and around their homes either. I think bats are cute but I would be terrified if one was in my house, and they are the heaviest transmitters of rabies. Spiders can be venomous. There's some toads that are toxic to dogs and they're pretty common in parts of Florida. The insectivores are a problem too. Just admit that every climate has its caveats.
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Old 10-18-2017, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,381,283 times
Reputation: 7704
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
If anything, it's a negative sum game, against the North, considering how aggressive insects have to be to get it all out (breeding, mating, etc), given shorter summers.



Meanwhile, the insects, finding the northern outdoor temperatures too cool for their survival, congregate to the only warm sources they can find: houses, warmed by winter heaters. Think about it.

The only aggressive insects up north are mosquitoes, at least for MN. And they're hardly more aggressive than in Florida. In Florida they last waaay longer, too. Hell, some SUMMER nights in Minnesota are cool enough to ward them off. Meanwhile in Miami lows are still in the mid and upper 70s even now in October. Skeeters are still biting down there, honey. They ain't biting up here even with our current warm wave. They're long gone til next May probably.
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Old 10-18-2017, 12:15 PM
 
1,593 posts, read 832,249 times
Reputation: 1220
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
If anything, it's a negative sum game, against the North, considering how aggressive insects have to be to get it all out (breeding, mating, etc), given shorter summers.



Meanwhile, the insects, finding the northern outdoor temperatures too cool for their survival, congregate to the only warm sources they can find: houses, warmed by winter heaters. Think about it.
I mean even in the South mosquito's need bite. They would still be drawn to people for their need to eat. What down South do mosquito's not need need to bite people cause its warm out?
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Old 10-18-2017, 12:48 PM
 
5,111 posts, read 2,749,174 times
Reputation: 9399
You could never get me to go back to the 4 seasons of hell that is FL. I'll take arid heat to humidity any day as well as a nice fall/spring and a limited cold & snowy winter.
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