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Old 10-18-2017, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,884 posts, read 10,385,743 times
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You either like a change in seasons or you don't-I don't understand how it can be "overrated". Its mostly just what a person is used to and grew up with. I love Summer and warm weather, but there are definitely pros and cons to it lasting all or most of the year. Bugs are definitely a factor in warm weather climates. My dog recently got fleas and I quickly had him treated, but I am happy that it's something I no longer have to worry about now that cooler temps at night kill them off (until next year). I really, really hate fleas, ticks, mosquitos, roaches, ants, etc. And roaches in the South fly
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Old 10-18-2017, 02:45 PM
Status: "Be yourself. What's the alternative?" (set 19 days ago)
 
8,692 posts, read 10,839,690 times
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I grew up w/ 4 seasons and never liked it much. I liked summer. I like it warm mostly all year, w/ some cold being okay (and a little snow). I don't enjoy shoveling snow or looking at rainy days on end. I don't like freezing rain. I don't like the thought of snow tires. I don't like furnaces or hearing them. I don't enjoy bundling up w/ heavy sweaters, coats and socks. Some people don't mind it, but I always did.
You do have less bugs w/ colder climates. I'll give you that one. Parts of the South West have no bugs or little bugs though.
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Old 10-18-2017, 04:49 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,280,275 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
The South has more insectivores because they have more insects. Doy!!!
...so the increase in insect population is balanced out, meaning that the issue is neutralized. What part of that don't you get?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
The roach infestation happened because they nested under the floor.
That still falls under my point regarding the variability of pest infestations in an area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Yes, you can also have bug infestations up north. But you also don't have mosquitoes outside for 9 months of the year. I've yet to see a cockroach in Minnesota, though. Hell, I rarely saw any in Texas.

Fire ants, which are invasive in the South, suck. We have no anteaters to eat them. They make tasks like mowing the lawn more miserable than they already are. We don't have fire ants this far north.
Shorter, yet more aggressive mosquito activity up North compared to down South. Longer summer sunlight, a hurried mating season (shorter time), and standing meltwater from winter thaw all contribute to that disparity.

Not only that, as I've mentioned before, any insect infestation can be more palpable up North, especially with the colder winters, which force insects to congregate around whatever warmth they can find...right in warm, toasty houses from winter heaters.

No anteaters in the Southern US, but plenty of ant eaters: southern black widows and eastern bobwhites, just to name a few, which make it their mission to attack the queens (thus killing the colony).

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
What's so great about having so many insectivores anyway when

A. The insects GREATLY outnumber them anyway. Having more insectivores doesn't mean I'll hardly be bitten by mosquitoes.

B. A lot of the insectivores are considered "unpleasant" by the general population. People tend to not like bats, spiders, lizards or frogs especially in and around their homes either. I think bats are cute but I would be terrified if one was in my house, and they are the heaviest transmitters of rabies. Spiders can be venomous. There's some toads that are toxic to dogs and they're pretty common in parts of Florida. The insectivores are a problem too. Just admit that every climate has its caveats.
That's fair. Then again, I don't have irrational phobias of these creatures like others do, so our perspectives aren't the same.
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Old 10-18-2017, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,384,906 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SWFL_Native View Post
You could never get me to go back to the 4 seasons of hell that is FL. I'll take arid heat to humidity any day as well as a nice fall/spring and a limited cold & snowy winter.
Amen, brother! I'm flying home to Miami for Thanksgiving and while I'm looking forward to turkey, mashed potatoes, butternut squash soup and eating frito pie while watching old VHS tapes with the fam, I'm sure as hell not looking forward to warm weather in November. Thanksgiving needs to be either cold or cool.
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Old 10-18-2017, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,854 posts, read 7,801,051 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Lol that's like saying "This place may have more crime, but at least it has more cops to deal with crime so its like a moot point!!!"
LMAO +1
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Old 10-18-2017, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,384,906 times
Reputation: 7710
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
...so the increase in insect population is balanced out, meaning that the issue is neutralized. What part of that don't you get?



That still falls under my point regarding the variability of pest infestations in an area.



Shorter, yet more aggressive mosquito activity up North compared to down South. Longer summer sunlight, a hurried mating season (shorter time), and standing meltwater from winter thaw all contribute to that disparity.

Not only that, as I've mentioned before, any insect infestation can be more palpable up North, especially with the colder winters, which force insects to congregate around whatever warmth they can find...right in warm, toasty houses from winter heaters.

No anteaters in the Southern US, but plenty of ant eaters: southern black widows and eastern bobwhites, just to name a few, which make it their mission to attack the queens (thus killing the colony).



That's fair. Then again, I don't have irrational phobias of these creatures like others do, so our perspectives aren't the same.

It doesn't balance out because the prey VASTLY outnumber the predator. Plus, insectivores aren't everywhere. For example where my aunt used to live in Naples, right outside her apartment you'd get eaten by mosquitoes. But if you go to the little lake near her apartment there's a huge dragonfly population and they keep the mosquitoes at bay. But those dragonflies stick to the lake, they're not everywhere. (Speaking of, that lake has alligators too.) You act as if these insectivores are just as widespread as their food supply. No. They're not. That's like saying "yea there's lots of corn in Iowa but there's lots of people to eat the corn so I mean is there REALLY that much corn?" yes cuz there's FAR more corn than there's people eating it!

"Standing melt water" you do realise that Florida is for the most part a SWAMP right? There's already plenty of mosquito breeding ground you don't need snowmelt.
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Old 10-18-2017, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,854 posts, read 7,801,051 times
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http://www.city-data.com/forum/searc...rchid=30092154
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Old 10-18-2017, 08:48 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,280,275 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
It doesn't balance out because the prey VASTLY outnumber the predator. Plus, insectivores aren't everywhere. For example where my aunt used to live in Naples, right outside her apartment you'd get eaten by mosquitoes. But if you go to the little lake near her apartment there's a huge dragonfly population and they keep the mosquitoes at bay. But those dragonflies stick to the lake, they're not everywhere. (Speaking of, that lake has alligators too.)
It's all good since the predators eat good quantities of the prey. A single bat can eat up to 1000 mosquitoes in one night:
How Many Bugs per Night Do Bats Eat?

Now consider that there are lots of other bats around in the area, along with the many other insectivore species...

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
You act as if these insectivores are just as widespread as their food supply. No. They're not. That's like saying "yea there's lots of corn in Iowa but there's lots of people to eat the corn so I mean is there REALLY that much corn?" yes cuz there's FAR more corn than there's people eating it!
They are. Remember, I'm including a wide variety of species in the category, whether bats, lizards, birds, and other arthropods (i.e. spiders, centipedes, etc). Even other insect species are insectivores (like the dragonflies you mention). The territory that all these organisms cover is hardly restricted in range.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
"Standing melt water" you do realize that Florida is for the most part a SWAMP right? There's already plenty of mosquito breeding ground you don't need snowmelt.
Standing meltwater in the north that doesn't drain as quickly as in the south, since the freeze layer up north goes deeper. All combined with more solar isolation as summer days are much longer up north. The far north, at the Arctic Circle, has very high mosquito swarms for these reason, probably the worst on Earth: the swarms literally blacken the sky. Some posts a few pages ago referenced this fact.
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Old 10-18-2017, 09:00 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,808 posts, read 1,302,111 times
Reputation: 3206
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
If anything, it's a negative sum game, against the North, considering how aggressive insects have to be to get it all out (breeding, mating, etc), given shorter summers.



Meanwhile, the insects, finding the northern outdoor temperatures too cool for their survival, congregate to the only warm sources they can find: houses, warmed by winter heaters. Think about it.
Well I actually grew up in the north, so yeah I know what I'm talking about.
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Old 10-18-2017, 09:11 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,280,275 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
The only aggressive insects up north are mosquitoes, at least for MN. And they're hardly more aggressive than in Florida. In Florida they last waaay longer, too. Hell, some SUMMER nights in Minnesota are cool enough to ward them off. Meanwhile in Miami lows are still in the mid and upper 70s even now in October. Skeeters are still biting down there, honey. They ain't biting up here even with our current warm wave. They're long gone til next May probably.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_General View Post
I mean even in the South mosquito's need bite. They would still be drawn to people for their need to eat. What down South do mosquito's not need need to bite people cause its warm out?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
Well I actually grew up in the north, so yeah I know what I'm talking about.
The worst mosquito swarms are in the Arctic. Look it up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jandrew5 View Post
I can see the Socal argument, but Texas?? Yeah, no.
South Texas has very warm winters the the OP likes, pretty much the best in the CONUS apart from peninsular Florida.
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