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Old 10-19-2017, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,386,291 times
Reputation: 7710

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
It's all good since the predators eat good quantities of the prey. A single bat can eat up to 1000 mosquitoes in one night:
How Many Bugs per Night Do Bats Eat?

Now consider that there are lots of other bats around in the area, along with the many other insectivore species...



They are. Remember, I'm including a wide variety of species in the category, whether bats, lizards, birds, and other arthropods (i.e. spiders, centipedes, etc). Even other insect species are insectivores (like the dragonflies you mention). The territory that all these organisms cover is hardly restricted in range.



Standing meltwater in the north that doesn't drain as quickly as in the south, since the freeze layer up north goes deeper. All combined with more solar isolation as summer days are much longer up north. The far north, at the Arctic Circle, has very high mosquito swarms for these reason, probably the worst on Earth: the swarms literally blacken the sky. Some posts a few pages ago referenced this fact.
I swear the only time I seen a bat in my whole life was in Tennessee on a winter day. Lizards only live in large numbers in Florida and parts of the deep south. There's also lizards out west but those places don't have serious bug problems. Frogs help but only in damp marshy areas and bodies of water. Dragonflies are similar. There's no plethora of insectivores and even where there are there's far far far more insects that outnumber them. You can mention spiders too but again... many people loathe spiders more than they do mosquitoes. I don't, but I am not many people.

Just drop the argument, dude. It's going nowhere. I personally don't mind bugs. I can't imagine not having ladybugs, butterflies, ants, cute little beetles and worms, but you can't deny the South has a worse bug problem than the North. A higher proportion of insectivores means nothing. Not when the warm season is substantially longer and not when the bug population is so high anyway. "A bat eats 1,000 mosquitoes a day" yea too bad there's millions of mosquitoes. Hah!
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Old 10-19-2017, 12:56 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,281,185 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Just drop the argument, dude. It's going nowhere.
Of course it can't, you (and others) are too deep in your irrational phobias to understand my points.

Last edited by Texyn; 10-19-2017 at 01:17 PM..
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Old 10-19-2017, 02:09 PM
 
6,500 posts, read 4,079,544 times
Reputation: 16800
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
Of course it can't, you (and others) are too deep in your irrational phobias to understand my points.
I have NO phobias about bugs or any other invertebrates. There are currently five large swallowtail caterpillars on a fennel plant on my bathroom counter. If I find a tarantula while I'm riding my bike, I pick it up and move it off the trail. If a bee lands on me, I stand still and quietly observe it until it flies away. My yard is full of brown widows and I don't spray because spiders don't bother me (and spraying would kill the beneficial creatures). You would be hard pressed to find a less critter-phobic person than me.

So a phobia is not influencing me when I state the simple fact that on the West Coast, when I go outside in the summer, or any time of the year for that matter, I am not bitten by mosquitoes or anything else. Not ever.

Now can you say the same for Florida? Whatever the benefits of a humid sub-tropical climate may be, being bug-free is not one of them. And what exactly does "the issue [of pests] is neutralized" mean anyway? That there aren't any bugs or that they don't bother people?

And by the way, you are quite wrong in your naive assumption that insects, spiders, and other creatures in cold climates depend on invasion of warm houses to survive the winter. That is not a significant strategy for them (how would they have survived before people arrived??) Some migrate, some go into a dormant state, many die and only leave their eggs to hatch in the spring. Go ahead, ask your Northern friends if their houses are full of mosquitoes in the winter.
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Old 10-19-2017, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Gulf Coast
1,256 posts, read 542,087 times
Reputation: 1981
I miss it soooooooo much!!!!!!

I'm a Michigan girl born and raised ... it was home for 36 years and will always be. Down here in the Deep South we get two seasons: HOT summer and less hot summer. Fall is my favorite season.
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Old 10-19-2017, 03:26 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,281,185 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
And by the way, you are quite wrong in your naive assumption that insects, spiders, and other creatures in cold climates depend on invasion of warm houses to survive the winter. That is not a significant strategy for them (how would they have survived before people arrived??) Some migrate, some go into a dormant state, many die and only leave their eggs to hatch in the spring. Go ahead, ask your Northern friends if their houses are full of mosquitoes in the winter.
They take advantage of warm, toasty homes in winter the same way animals like rats, pigeons, etc learned to thrive in urban settings.
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Old 10-19-2017, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,122 posts, read 1,308,027 times
Reputation: 1826
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
They take advantage of warm, toasty homes in winter the same way animals like rats, pigeons, etc learned to thrive in urban settings.
I’ve never seen this in my life. You don’t see mosquitos and flies invading peoples houses in the winter. You don’t even see them anywhere at all during Winter. As much as I hate Winter, this is one thing I must admit that’s pretty great about it.

It’s actually Summer and the warmer months when you have to deal with flies and mosquitos getting inside your home. Usually through an open door or window or whatever.
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Old 10-19-2017, 04:26 PM
 
6,500 posts, read 4,079,544 times
Reputation: 16800
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
They take advantage of warm, toasty homes in winter the same way animals like rats, pigeons, etc learned to thrive in urban settings.
Have you researched this at all? It doesn't sound like it.

And even if it were true--which it isn't--it certainly implies that in the warm South, insects invade people's homes all year round! Oh...wait...
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Old 10-19-2017, 05:22 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,281,185 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
I’ve never seen this in my life. You don’t see mosquitos and flies invading peoples houses in the winter. You don’t even see them anywhere at all during Winter. As much as I hate Winter, this is one thing I must admit that’s pretty great about it.
Not really flies or mosquitoes, but more like cockroaches, spiders, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
And even if it were true--which it isn't--it certainly implies that in the warm South, insects invade people's homes all year round! Oh...wait...
What you aren't getting is that the insects have no reason to invade people's homes when their outdoor habitats remain suitable year-round, like in the warm South. Not that there won't be encounters, of course.

But up North, during the colder winters, the only suitable warmth is found only in toasty, centrally-heated homes. While some insects evolved to have their life-cycles in tune with the seasons, others like cockroaches have learned to take advantage of those warm sources; they end up congregating, which, in turn, leads to increased perception of household pests, in ways that you won't see in the warm subtropics/tropics (especially in developed areas of those climates).

An ironic situation that makes sense if you truly think about it.

Last edited by Texyn; 10-19-2017 at 05:40 PM..
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Old 10-19-2017, 05:45 PM
 
6,500 posts, read 4,079,544 times
Reputation: 16800
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
What you aren't getting is that the insects have no reason to invade people's homes when their outdoor habitats remain suitable year-round, like in the warm South. Not that there won't be encounters, of course.
The truth is ironic indeed:

Quote:
When it comes to cockroach infestations, the South reigns supreme. Forty-one percent of households that responded to the survey in New Orleans reported having cockroaches.

Of the top 10 cities with the most reported cockroaches, nine are in the South.
Roaches and rodents: Which cities have the most? - CNN

The top four cities, by the way, are New Orleans, Houston, Miami, and Atlanta. The first Northern city on the list, New York City, comes in at #9.
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Old 10-19-2017, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,386,291 times
Reputation: 7710
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
They take advantage of warm, toasty homes in winter the same way animals like rats, pigeons, etc learned to thrive in urban settings.
Dude, most of the South has winters that are still fairly cold with freezes every now and then and I STILL in the years I have lived in Texas (where it does get cold even if not like Minnesota) have never had an indoor bug problem in the winter. Mosquitoes do not go inside homes in large numbers if at all. Mosquitoes in Texas die off in November. They die down by October. There hasn't been any mosquitoes here in MN since September and they certainly aren't inside my house. What you are saying is a load of bull. The inside of my house isn't even all that warm for them, the other day it was 59 INSIDE.

But on the other hand, I can't even COUNT the amount of times we had flies or roaches inside the house in Miami. Maybe they come inside for the air conditioning? Lol
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