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Old 10-04-2017, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,752,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
BC likes to exaggerate. We maybe get a handful of days per year where we will see Dallas style humidity, and mainly in the mornings at that (most summer days, our lowest dewpoints occur in the afternoon.)

Our average dewpoint in July is 58, 62 in August and 56 in September. In comparison, Miami's average dewpoint in July is 75, Houston's is 74 and Dallas's is 71. So we are certainly drier than anywhere back east even in our "humid" season
Ahhh I don't know how dew point relates to feel but I get the general picture.
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Old 10-04-2017, 01:44 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,808 posts, read 1,299,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Dry heat is more bearable from what I hear. You can actually cool off in the shade, right?
Yeah it can be much cooler in the shade. Growing up it could be 100 degree outside but if you go down to the river it drops 10-15 degrees. Also nights cool off much more, at higher altitudes, even more so.
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Old 10-04-2017, 01:53 PM
 
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I'd say yes and no. On one hand I do like seeing visible change of seasons outside. On the other hand I don't like having to prepare for it. Yeah October in the mid-atlantic can be frustrating. 40 in the morning 80 in the afternoon isn't uncommon.
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Old 10-04-2017, 02:03 PM
 
157 posts, read 99,145 times
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Being in the midwest, I like having four seasons, but what I really dislike is how the fall is too short and then winter lasts a lot longer.
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Old 10-04-2017, 02:21 PM
 
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I'm not tempted by a true four-season climate. In my experience, people who live in one of those love the change of seasons, sure, but only because after a long, hot, humid summer, fall is a welcome relief (even if it only lasts four weeks). After a long, frigid, snowy winter, spring is another relief (even if it comes and goes in the blink of any eye).

In Southern California, the changes of seasons are subtle but definitely there. We don't have year-round summer; winter highs in the 60s and 70s are pretty blissful, in my opinion, but they're not "summer." But the changes are slight enough that we can enjoy outdoor activities year-round, with only slight adjustments.
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Old 10-04-2017, 02:24 PM
 
88 posts, read 51,030 times
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What are the best states for four-season climates?
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Old 10-04-2017, 02:31 PM
 
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I grew up in the northeast. My mother always tells this story about how when I was only 7 years old I would complain for weeks on end about how much I hated the cold and the snow. And I remember her always telling me to appreciate the seasons (she's one of the weirdos who likes cold weather.)

Now, I'm older, and still can't stand the seasons. The moment I turned 18 I fled south as fast as I could!

I definitely appreciate the colorful leaves during fall which New England has, but only for a very short period of time. Like one day lol. The feeling of cold air hitting my skin is absolutely miserable to me.

Living here in Raleigh is a nice in between. It gets chilly, but not nearly as awful as what I grew up experiencing. I remember looking out the window at the rain when I was little and wondering why my parents moved there lol.
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Old 10-04-2017, 02:50 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Seasons tend to be appreciated by people who are in tune with them.

Some people do not like to be inconvenienced by weather and do everything to avoid anything but 75 degrees even if that means staying indoors for a big part of the year. Others consider the challenge of extremes of weather to be invigorating, even essential to their health.

People who live (and I mean live, not stay indoors) in seasonal or even extreme climates, whether cold or hot, are constitutionally far stronger than those who crave the dull monotony of coastal southern California.

It is like exercise. It doesn't always feel as good as sitting on the couch, but you feel better overall for experiencing it. Especially if you exercise in very hot or very cold conditions. I am always amused by people who say they can't live in a very cold or very hot climate because they can't exercise. Bo11ocks. I hate heat more than most, but I make a point to not use my A/C until my house becomes near unbearable (over 80F), and I exercise outdoors (with the proper precautions) even when the temps go over 100. Likewise, in winter sub-freezing, even sub zero, temperatures do not stop me from walking, snowshoeing, skiing, etc.

To willfully encounter weather is to adapt to it. Some people refuse to adapt and would rather live the weather equivalent of sitting in a warm bath.
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Old 10-04-2017, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
47 posts, read 36,703 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Seasons tend to be appreciated by people who are in tune with them.

Some people do not like to be inconvenienced by weather and do everything to avoid anything but 75 degrees even if that means staying indoors for a big part of the year. Others consider the challenge of extremes of weather to be invigorating, even essential to their health.

People who live (and I mean live, not stay indoors) in seasonal or even extreme climates, whether cold or hot, are constitutionally far stronger than those who crave the dull monotony of coastal southern California.

It is like exercise. It doesn't always feel as good as sitting on the couch, but you feel better overall for experiencing it. Especially if you exercise in very hot or very cold conditions. I am always amused by people who say they can't live in a very cold or very hot climate because they can't exercise. Bo11ocks. I hate heat more than most, but I make a point to not use my A/C until my house becomes near unbearable (over 80F), and I exercise outdoors (with the proper precautions) even when the temps go over 100. Likewise, in winter sub-freezing, even sub zero, temperatures do not stop me from walking, snowshoeing, skiing, etc.

To willfully encounter weather is to adapt to it. Some people refuse to adapt and would rather live the weather equivalent of sitting in a warm bath.
I respectfully disagree. I spent the first 22 years of my life in Wisconsin/the Midwest and I did not perceive what you claim. Perhaps people behave differently elsewhere.

Most people who live in harsher climates do so because that's where they were born/raised, or their careers took them there. In my experience, very few of these people live as you describe and most tend to complain incessantly about the climate during harsher seasons. When you ask them what they like about living where they do, the often cite other amenities as making up for/negating the effects of their local climate. If they like 'seasonality', it's usually in reference to fall/spring, which tend to be shorter seasons in harsher climates anyways. But when a family member/friend decides to move to a milder climate, suddenly living in a place with 4-6 months of winter becomes a badge of honor/mark of superiority . Funny how that doesn't stop them from begging to visit once temperatures start to drop.

Again, that's my experience. I can't stand people who maintain a superiority complex from living in a harsher climate when it's clearly a coping mechanism. Of course, that doesn't apply to everyone. I do think a lot of Wisconsin's climate is harsher than most places in the states too.

As for your point about exercising, good for you that you maintain consistency in spite of the inconveniences of weather. Most people who live in the climates you described do not exercise frequently. There's a reason exercise rates are higher in 'dull, monotonous' Southern California than places like the Midwest.
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Old 10-04-2017, 03:49 PM
 
1,353 posts, read 1,273,036 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tman7117 View Post
Not to say that it's wrong to like a change of seasons, but I personally don't see why people like it so much.
Living in the New York metro area, an area that gets 4 very distinct seasons, I can't stand it. Especially the change from summer to fall when it's that awkward point in late September/October and you don't know what to where because it's 40 degrees in the morning and 75 by 1 in the afternoon. Don't even get me started on winter. I'd rather have a year long summer/warm climate like So.Cal or Texas/Florida

Anyone else feel this way?
It all depends, are we talking a Michigan grey dreary winter or say a Denver cold, but sunny winter?
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