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Old 10-24-2017, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,908 posts, read 6,844,411 times
Reputation: 5837

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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I think it's important for four-seasons people to realize that people in less seasonally favored climates still enjoy most or all of the cultural activities associated with the seasons just as much. We still go back to school, celebrate holidays, eat seasonal foods, etc. The fact that our weather doesn't jive with what you consider "right" for the time of year doesn't make those activities any less enjoyable for us.

And in Australia they celebrate Christmas with a barbecue at the beach.
Exactly, Christmas is literally in Summer in the Southern Hemisphere 👍
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Old 10-24-2017, 05:55 PM
 
6,464 posts, read 4,063,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Exactly, Christmas is literally in Summer in the Southern Hemisphere ��
Right. I am realizing that certain weather patterns are really strongly connected with holidays and other customs, for people in specific four-seasons climates, to the point where they almost can't dissociate them.

When you say your area doesn't have a typical "cold, crisp fall with autumn colors," they respond, "B-b-b-but Halloween, apple cider and pumpkins!"

Yeah, we have all those.

(I'm not even referring to anyone on C-D in particular. I hear this in real life all the time, mostly from transplants, but there are even a few natives who say things like "It just doesn't feel like Christmas when it's 75 degrees." But they've never actually lived anywhere else, let alone experienced a "white Christmas.")
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Old 10-24-2017, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,849 posts, read 7,793,965 times
Reputation: 9469
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I think it's important for four-seasons people to realize that people in less seasonally favored climates still enjoy most or all of the cultural activities associated with the seasons just as much. We still go back to school, celebrate holidays, eat seasonal foods, etc. The fact that our weather doesn't jive with what you consider "right" for the time of year doesn't make those activities any less enjoyable for us.

And in Australia they celebrate Christmas with a barbecue at the beach.
Personally, I wasn’t aware that any climate is universally favored. That doesn’t even make sense. Each person has their favored climate and with any luck, we are able to find ourselves living in it.
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Old 10-24-2017, 06:25 PM
 
6,464 posts, read 4,063,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
Personally, I wasn’t aware that any climate is universally favored. That doesn’t even make sense. Each person has their favored climate and with any luck, we are able to find ourselves living in it.
Oh, absolutely. But even some people who grew up here and otherwise love the SoCal climate, or say they do, are known to say wistfully "I just can't get in the mood for Christmas when it's so warm." It's a strange phenomenon. All those Christmas carols and cards with their lyrics and pictures of snowflakes, snowmen, sleigh rides and holly berries must have some psychological effect.
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Old 10-24-2017, 06:34 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,035 posts, read 34,995,637 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Oh, absolutely. But even some people who grew up here and otherwise love the SoCal climate, or say they do, are known to say wistfully "I just can't get in the mood for Christmas when it's so warm." It's a strange phenomenon. All those Christmas carols and cards with their lyrics and pictures of snowflakes, snowmen, sleigh rides and holly berries must have some psychological effect.
Christmas traditions in this country seem to harken back to the days when the population centers of the US were located in the Northeast and Upper Midwest.
That ship has sailed.
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Old 10-24-2017, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,849 posts, read 7,793,965 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iconographer View Post
Christmas traditions in this country seem to harken back to the days when the population centers of the US were located in the Northeast and Upper Midwest.
That ship has sailed.
But the cultural DNA remains.
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Old 10-24-2017, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,839 posts, read 2,973,256 times
Reputation: 3384
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iconographer View Post
Christmas traditions in this country seem to harken back to the days when the population centers of the US were located in the Northeast and Upper Midwest.
That ship has sailed.
It was a reason I moved north. Love cold weather, Christmas season.
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Old 10-24-2017, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Denver
3,189 posts, read 2,639,643 times
Reputation: 2226
Is it true that the leaves don't really turn colors in the coastal plains in the south, that they just kind of turn brown and fall off the tree?
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Old 10-24-2017, 10:13 PM
 
377 posts, read 201,774 times
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I too find it hard to get into the Christmas spirit without snow. I too find it hard to get into Halloween without the leaves changing into reds, oranges and yellows to add to the ambience. Or a Easter with no spring bloom.

But these are just isolated days, and it's possible to visit family in places where you can have a white Christmas.

What's funny in those places, the people living in those climates will often just wish for snow twice. The first snow, and snow on Christmas. And that's it, the rest is spent cursing it
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Old 10-24-2017, 11:32 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,277,280 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil P View Post
Is it true that the leaves don't really turn colors in the coastal plains in the south, that they just kind of turn brown and fall off the tree?
Many tree species have widespread North to South distributions in the Eastern US. Often times, these trees are classically deciduous up north, but become what are known as "semi-evergreens" in the warmer Southern US coastal plain. Semi-evergreen means that they take either of two characteristics:
  • They keep their leaves quite green through winter, but have a very short leaf loss period (often when new flowers are starting to grow).
  • Or they only lose a portion of their leaves during winter, still staying quite green, but turn classically deciduous if the winter is harsher than normal.
I'll dig through my archives to see if I have good pictures demonstrating the effect.
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