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Old 10-25-2017, 05:35 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,919 posts, read 6,850,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
I too find it hard to get into the Christmas spirit without snow. I too find it hard to get into Halloween without the leaves changing into reds, oranges and yellows to add to the ambience. Or a Easter with no spring bloom.

But these are just isolated days, and it's possible to visit family in places where you can have a white Christmas.

What's funny in those places, the people living in those climates will often just wish for snow twice. The first snow, and snow on Christmas. And that's it, the rest is spent cursing it
Repped because of the bolded
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Old 10-25-2017, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,849 posts, read 7,795,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
I too find it hard to get into the Christmas spirit without snow. I too find it hard to get into Halloween without the leaves changing into reds, oranges and yellows to add to the ambience. Or a Easter with no spring bloom.
I suspect you, like I, grew up in a 4 season climate. Your norm for holiday weather matches mine. I’m curious if you’ve ever lived in the south, however, or another area with a warmer year round climate. I lived and worked in Houston for 26 years, starting in my late 20s. The first Christmas, I found it anomalous to see palmed trees outlined in white lights and to play tennis on December 25 but I went with it. After all, this is the only model of Christmas a couple of million southeat Texans have ever known. And you know what? It was always fun!

That said, Texans, along with others living in moderate climates still watch “White Christmas” with Bing Crosby and hear “Winter Wonderland” piped through the mall while holiday shopping each December. This means that they are a lot more familiar with our typical Christmas than we are with theirs. And, tbh at least for me, being bundled up and drinking at wassail at the Christmas market along with sitting by the fire on Christmas Eve is pretty cool. But just because our holiday norms mean so much to us doesn’t mean there aren’t less chilly traditions that others across the country look forward to when their days grow short and their evenings long.
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Old 10-25-2017, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,656 posts, read 36,118,702 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
We have a mosquito tent for our backyard here. Honestly, this whole bug thing is getting outta hand. I personally am not a huge bug hater, I do hate mosquitos but I would not go outta my way to never see them again. But you can't act like the South does have far more bugs that persist for longer. It's silly to deny that. And again, not all bugs are all that bad. Texas summers aren't the same without cicadas in the day or without fireflies at night.

I will say the worst bugs to deal with in Texas aren't mosquitos, it's FIELD CRICKETS. I remember when I used to live in rural West Texas we had a field cricket population through the roof. You wanna talk about bugs that get inside (and not because of weather) look at field crickets! And they get in HUGE groups and if you ever smell a dead pile of them you would swear it was roadkill.
Oh, wow, haven't had that problem here in northeast Texas but it sounds terrible!

I love the sound of cicadas by the way - like you said, I can't imagine a summer without that sound.

I guess I'm just used to bugs in general, growing up in the south. I do away with mosquitoes by treating the yard, and I just don't have a cockroach problem at all (or "water bug" problem for that matter), but we do get black widows in our garage sometimes. And I was bitten by a brown recluse spider once (what fun).

I guess the biggest bug problem I've had is spiders - they're occasional but I have a very low tolerance level for them. With the exception of the garden spiders, which I think are pretty cool (the big green and yellow ones).

BUT - as for the change of seasons being overrated - I don't think it's overrated - I think it's cool when the seasons change. My daughter lived in Guam for three years and the weather just never changed, except for a few months of the year being monsoon season. Highs in the 80s, lows in the 70s. Day in and day out. Beach breezes. Sometimes rain, sometimes not. Jungle that stayed green all year round. Beautiful for a bit but year in and year out - she didn't like it.

And talk about BUGS. whoa!!!
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Old 10-26-2017, 02:53 AM
 
377 posts, read 201,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
I suspect you, like I, grew up in a 4 season climate. Your norm for holiday weather matches mine. Iím curious if youíve ever lived in the south, however, or another area with a warmer year round climate. I lived and worked in Houston for 26 years, starting in my late 20s. The first Christmas, I found it anomalous to see palmed trees outlined in white lights and to play tennis on December 25 but I went with it. After all, this is the only model of Christmas a couple of million southeat Texans have ever known. And you know what? It was always fun!
You suspect right, I spent most of my childhood years in Michigan.

And I have lived in the South and West (Los Angeles, San Diego, Houston, Atlanta, Miami). Now I'm based out of Singapore. Still go back to the states occasionally.

I still don't like a warm Christmas. For me, the cold (forcing people indoors, drinking eggnog, fireplace, looking outside to see homes blanketed in snow, christmas lights lighting up the dark sky and the glowing snow) is an integral part of Christmas for me.

But. New Years Eve? Love it when it's warm. Even though for most of my childhood years, NYE was always cold, this hasn't translated into my expectations or desires.

So I think it's a little bit more than just where you grew up. I think its national cultural expectations as well. So many movies and shows play up a "White Christmas" while none do so for NYE.

I have a condo back in Miami Beach, and I try to make it back for NYE. Miami can be warm and balmy during NYE or it can be kind of rainy and chilly just depending on luck. I always wish for a warm balmy night where I can go out to Ocean Dr, take in the energy (it's closed off to traffic on NYE) and then wonder back to my balcony overlooking the ocean in shorts and a t-shirt, crack open some champagne and watch the moon over the ocean.

In contrast, Christmas, I'm either at my property in Europe or back with my parents in SE Michigan. Spending Christmas in Miami depresses me!
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Old 10-26-2017, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,849 posts, read 7,795,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
You suspect right, I spent most of my childhood years in Michigan.

And I have lived in the South and West (Los Angeles, San Diego, Houston, Atlanta, Miami). Now I'm based out of Singapore. Still go back to the states occasionally.

I still don't like a warm Christmas. For me, the cold (forcing people indoors, drinking eggnog, fireplace, looking outside to see homes blanketed in snow, christmas lights lighting up the dark sky and the glowing snow) is an integral part of Christmas for me.

But. New Years Eve? Love it when it's warm. Even though for most of my childhood years, NYE was always cold, this hasn't translated into my expectations or desires.

So I think it's a little bit more than just where you grew up. I think its national cultural expectations as well. So many movies and shows play up a "White Christmas" while none do so for NYE.

I have a condo back in Miami Beach, and I try to make it back for NYE. Miami can be warm and balmy during NYE or it can be kind of rainy and chilly just depending on luck. I always wish for a warm balmy night where I can go out to Ocean Dr, take in the energy (it's closed off to traffic on NYE) and then wonder back to my balcony overlooking the ocean in shorts and a t-shirt, crack open some champagne and watch the moon over the ocean.

In contrast, Christmas, I'm either at my property in Europe or back with my parents in SE Michigan. Spending Christmas in Miami depresses me!
Ah ha! Sorry I forgot you were the poster living in Singapore. I went there twice on business back in the 2000s before I retired. Even though I was coming in from Houston, it was seriously oppressive. Itís a beautiful place, nonetheless.

For me, a warm Christmas is a bit like a glass of lemonade at room temperature when Iím thirsty. It addresses the primary need but is not particularly refreshing. When I retired at the end of 2010 we returnec back east to a 4 season climate. So far, no white Christmases but itís at least within the realm of the possible now.

Since my mid-20s I havenít particularly enjoyed NYE at any temperature. It always seemed a time to be ecstatically happy, whether I am or not. Since moving, we have good friends within a walkable distance who have had us over for dinner. There have been anywhere between 10 and 6 guests at ant given dinner. Spending NYE with friends without having to drive has worked quite well. I must say, however, the idea of watching the moon over the ocean in short and t-shirts with champagne also has a pretty strong appeal.
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Old 10-27-2017, 01:21 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,053 posts, read 3,379,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I think it's important for four-seasons people to realize that people in less seasonally favored climates still enjoy most or all of the cultural activities associated with the seasons just as much. We still go back to school, celebrate holidays, eat seasonal foods, etc. The fact that our weather doesn't jive with what you consider "right" for the time of year doesn't make those activities any less enjoyable for us.

And in Australia they celebrate Christmas with a barbecue at the beach.
It's still not the same. Really a football game on an evening in the 80s as opposed to 60s or 50s? You can't pick apples in climates too warm for them. Picking pumpkins in hot humid weather just isn't the same. Drinking hot chocolate when it's only 75 degrees out.

I could tell you that from Decembers growing up in Miami whenever we would get an actual cold night, we (me, my siblings and my dad) would get in the mood to sing Christmas carols and look at the Christmas lights. The chillier air changes the whole aspect. It gets one hyped up for holiday traditions in ways that constant warmth doesn't. I will say the same is true for places that don't have summer. You don't get to enjoy the pool or barbecues or other activities the same way. I love doing things in every season. This past summer I went tubing on a river this coming winter I wanna go snow tubing. Different activities for every season and I want my children to grow up with that because I did not.
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Old 10-27-2017, 05:06 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,919 posts, read 6,850,118 times
Reputation: 5841
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
It's still not the same. Really a football game on an evening in the 80s as opposed to 60s or 50s? You can't pick apples in climates too warm for them. Picking pumpkins in hot humid weather just isn't the same. Drinking hot chocolate when it's only 75 degrees out.

I could tell you that from Decembers growing up in Miami whenever we would get an actual cold night, we (me, my siblings and my dad) would get in the mood to sing Christmas carols and look at the Christmas lights. The chillier air changes the whole aspect. It gets one hyped up for holiday traditions in ways that constant warmth doesn't. I will say the same is true for places that don't have summer. You don't get to enjoy the pool or barbecues or other activities the same way. I love doing things in every season. This past summer I went tubing on a river this coming winter I wanna go snow tubing. Different activities for every season and I want my children to grow up with that because I did not.
To address your first point, football is most popular in the south ironically....
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Old 10-27-2017, 05:14 AM
 
377 posts, read 201,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
To address your first point, football is most popular in the south ironically....
In the midwest, the winter/cold weather gets in the way of football instead of enhancing it. Football isn't really supposed to be a cold weather sport. Probably (along with other cultural reasons) football (or rugby) never took off in Canada but ice hockey did.
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Old 10-27-2017, 05:33 AM
 
56,517 posts, read 80,824,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
In the midwest, the winter/cold weather gets in the way of football instead of enhancing it. Football isn't really supposed to be a cold weather sport. Probably (along with other cultural reasons) football (or rugby) never took off in Canada but ice hockey did.
Canada does have a professional Football league and has some popularity in that country. It is a slightly different style, but it is actually more popular than people may realize.

Football is more popular in the South due to other reasons such as it is a big event for a lot of communities, talent and in turn, investment in the sport.
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Old 10-27-2017, 06:33 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,656 posts, read 36,118,702 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
To address your first point, football is most popular in the south ironically....

But in much of the south, Friday night football is pretty dang chilly at night. I've gone to hundreds of high school football games in northeast Texas and in Georgia, and spent many a night bundled up with scarf, hat, gloves, etc. freezing my butt off! But I freely admit to freezing my butt off in 45 degrees - LOL.
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