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Old 10-29-2017, 05:51 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,093 posts, read 13,477,370 times
Reputation: 5766

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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Oh, absolutely. But even some people who grew up here and otherwise love the SoCal climate, or say they do, are known to say wistfully "I just can't get in the mood for Christmas when it's so warm." It's a strange phenomenon. All those Christmas carols and cards with their lyrics and pictures of snowflakes, snowmen, sleigh rides and holly berries must have some psychological effect.
You have to ask why all those images are associated with Christmas even in climates that never actually experience those things in real life. In the US, at least, Christmas is absolutely associated with a true winter climate, even in warmer places.
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Old 10-29-2017, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,093 posts, read 13,477,370 times
Reputation: 5766
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iconographer View Post
Christmas traditions in this country seem to harken back to the days when the population centers of the US were located in the Northeast and Upper Midwest.
That ship has sailed.
People didn't move South for the weather. They moved for economic reasons, most of which are no longer applicable as advantages. And most of the South's growth had nothing to do with region to region domestic migration. That's a myth.
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Old 10-29-2017, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,850 posts, read 7,795,643 times
Reputation: 9469
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
In my opinion, the northeast does have the most spectacular fall colors. But like every other region, it's a trade off - you can have amazing fall colors but you're also going to have one helluva long, cold winter and if you like that, it's great but if you don't - well, you still get it.
I spent 26 summers in Texas. It will take at least 26 winters here to erase those from my mind. Here in Philly, the seasons are divvied up pretty evenly, with about 3 months apiece of winter, spring, summer and fall. Even if you aren’t fond of any particular one, it will change pretty soon. Summer is actually my least favorite of the 4.

This 2 minute video nicely captures some of what I find appealing about winter here:



https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0nAfPQPUaAw
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Old 10-29-2017, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,681 posts, read 36,118,702 times
Reputation: 63225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
I spent 26 summers in Texas. It will take at least 26 winters here to erase those from my mind. Here in Philly, the seasons are divvied up pretty evenly, with about 3 months apiece of winter, spring, summer and fall. Even if you arenít fond of any particular one, it will change pretty soon. Summer is actually my least favorite of the 4.

This 2 minute video nicely captures some of what I find appealing about winter here:



https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0nAfPQPUaAw
I'm glad you're happy where you are. Personally I don't care much for the weather in Philly. But thankfully we have many different regions to choose from!

The only time Texas weather gets me down is when it's over 100 degrees for days on end (rare) or when it's 65 degrees Christmas week (also rare, but hey - it does happen). I was born and raised in the South so hot hot hot summers are the norm for me and they really don't bother me.

I will say though that it can get wretchedly hot in my home town of New Orleans, due to the humidity and high temps. Even then, I love the place.
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Old 10-29-2017, 08:44 PM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,427 posts, read 1,664,703 times
Reputation: 8643
I grew up in the Midwest and then moved to NY state where I had four seasons for 55+ years. I live in FL now, to be near my grandkids, the weather is secondary. I'm not missing the seasons since I enjoy seeing green/color all year more.

I was worried about being in an area with warm Christmas weather and not feeling the spirit. I shouldn't have. I found lights look the same in the dark, they illuminate a dark time of year, cold or warm weather doesn't matter. Our town has a huge Christmas parade the weekend after Thanksgiving, a boat parade we take a picnic to the week after and an arboretum with decorated trees and winding paths we meander through in no rush. We have on light jackets or shirtsleeves for all of these. Holiday foods are the same, but rather than being inside, we might have the doors to the lanai wide open or seated out by a pool.

The first year we put Christmas lights on the house in shorts and tee shirts, I began to realize the holidays in a warm climate had advantages, along with not having the mad rush in the fall to winterize the yard and house and then the spring cleaning inside and out after winter. I get to garden (and weed) all year here.

My granddaughter came across a down jacket from the back of her Mom's closet this weekend and put it on. She told me later that she feels sorry for kids in the North if they have to wear heavy coats like that in the winter. The heaviest clothing she's ever worn is a fleece jacket. She'll figure it out if she moves to a four season climate.

I'm not attached to having seasons, I'm okay with or without them.

Last edited by jean_ji; 10-29-2017 at 09:30 PM..
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Old 10-29-2017, 10:14 PM
 
329 posts, read 201,856 times
Reputation: 579
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
I spent 26 summers in Texas. It will take at least 26 winters here to erase those from my mind. Here in Philly, the seasons are divvied up pretty evenly, with about 3 months apiece of winter, spring, summer and fall. Even if you arenít fond of any particular one, it will change pretty soon. Summer is actually my least favorite of the 4.

This 2 minute video nicely captures some of what I find appealing about winter here:



https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0nAfPQPUaAw

I like the way you think and get it! I have spent 35 summers in central TX and this past summer was my LAST one! I am so done. I never acclimated to the heat and dreaded it every. single.year. My OH is retiring next spring and we will be out of here! I have been spending long chunks of time during summer/fall/ winter over the last three years up here in beautiful PA near Pittsburgh. I was born and raised up here and know what winter is all about. I appreciate the same things about winter that the video captures, too.

I love the sound of crunchy snow when I go out to walk, the crisp, bite of cold on my nose and cheeks, and the wonderful feeling of walking into a warm home after being out in the cold.

My only concern is learning to drive in winter weather as I will still be working.
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Old 10-30-2017, 07:51 AM
 
1,593 posts, read 831,682 times
Reputation: 1216
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
People didn't move South for the weather. They moved for economic reasons, most of which are no longer applicable as advantages. And most of the South's growth had nothing to do with region to region domestic migration. That's a myth.
So either everybody down South is having like 35 kids or everybody in the South is Hispanic or Asian?
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Old 10-30-2017, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,845 posts, read 2,975,563 times
Reputation: 3391
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
People didn't move South for the weather. They moved for economic reasons, most of which are no longer applicable as advantages. And most of the South's growth had nothing to do with region to region domestic migration. That's a myth.
Yes and no. A lot of old people hate the cold.
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Old 10-30-2017, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,845 posts, read 2,975,563 times
Reputation: 3391
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
I spent 26 summers in Texas. It will take at least 26 winters here to erase those from my mind. Here in Philly, the seasons are divvied up pretty evenly, with about 3 months apiece of winter, spring, summer and fall. Even if you arenít fond of any particular one, it will change pretty soon. Summer is actually my least favorite of the 4.

This 2 minute video nicely captures some of what I find appealing about winter here:



https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0nAfPQPUaAw
Love it.
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Old 10-30-2017, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,850 posts, read 7,795,643 times
Reputation: 9469
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I'm glad you're happy where you are. Personally I don't care much for the weather in Philly. But thankfully we have many different regions to choose from!

The only time Texas weather gets me down is when it's over 100 degrees for days on end (rare) or when it's 65 degrees Christmas week (also rare, but hey - it does happen). I was born and raised in the South so hot hot hot summers are the norm for me and they really don't bother me.

I will say though that it can get wretchedly hot in my home town of New Orleans, due to the humidity and high temps. Even then, I love the place.
I do think where a person grows up greatly influence oneís weather tolerance. I grew up in Delaware, and when it snowed, we went sledding, built snowmen and had snowball fights. When the temps stayed below freezing long enough, we went ice skating on the local ponds. As you might imagine, winter could be quite fun.

Conversely, I can imagine someone growing up in NOLA, playing outside during the long summer, would develop a great deal more tolerance for heat and humidity than someone from more temperate climates. We accept things as they are when weíre children, and take them to be the norm.
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