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Old 01-11-2018, 02:10 PM
 
377 posts, read 202,569 times
Reputation: 349

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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
But it IS really nice to be able to drive up to the mountains, play with the kids in the snow for a few hours, and drive home to nice, dry, 70-degree weather. That's enough snow for any of us.
Yea, nothing like being able to have snow when you want it and leave it when you get bored of it. In the USA, the big Island of Hawaii as best posed to take advantage of this, with the tall Mauna Kea and paradise lower 80s at sea level during the winter but the roads remain only accessible to 4-wheel drive vehicles and no one has bothered making ski slopes and resorts. Perhaps there are too few people living on the big island to justify this and tourists who fly to Hawaii tend to be going there to escape snow, not find it.
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Old 01-11-2018, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,392,125 times
Reputation: 7710
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
Yea, nothing like being able to have snow when you want it and leave it when you get bored of it. In the USA, the big Island of Hawaii as best posed to take advantage of this, with the tall Mauna Kea and paradise lower 80s at sea level during the winter but the roads remain only accessible to 4-wheel drive vehicles and no one has bothered making ski slopes and resorts. Perhaps there are too few people living on the big island to justify this and tourists who fly to Hawaii tend to be going there to escape snow, not find it.

I'm curious but how often does it actually snow up there and how much falls?
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Old 01-12-2018, 12:49 PM
 
377 posts, read 202,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
I'm curious but how often does it actually snow up there and how much falls?
It gets blasted pretty regularly by snowstorms from november to april. Typically by the afternoon, most of the snow is gone if it's a sunny day. But it's cold enough that a true ski resort could make its own snow for those periods. I don't know the official snowstorm totals.
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Old 01-12-2018, 03:28 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,808 posts, read 1,308,178 times
Reputation: 3211
I know someone who skied in Hawaii and he said the snow quality wasn't very good at all, it was only a novelty thing.
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Old 01-12-2018, 03:39 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,808 posts, read 1,308,178 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
I guarantee you don't grow satsumas up there...
Of course not, but I don't think Huckleberries or Cranberries grow down here, and many fruit trees that thrive in cooler places (like cheery trees) don't grow very well down here.
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Old 01-12-2018, 04:05 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
943 posts, read 415,476 times
Reputation: 460
Oh my god I can't believe you wrote this post! I'm thinking the SAME EXACT THING as you right now! I hate the 4 seasons it's miserable! I'd rather have constant hot uncomfortably humid weather all year round in Florida over the NYC metro area's 4 seasons. Hot weather all year round is something I could get used to, which is why people living in tropical countries seem so humble. They don't feel the humidity at all. I live New Jersey by the way. Many people see the east coast weather as "vibrant" and I absolutely cannot understand how ONE can love it. The human body is not suitable for cold weather. Honestly, I don't know why we created civilization up here in the northeast in the first place. You can't grow plants in the winter and you can't survive in the northeastern wilderness when vegetation dies. Autumn scenery is nice to me, but people think it's a happy thing, but for me it's not. Changes of leaves means the gateway to a hell of winter.
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Old 01-12-2018, 04:07 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,283,591 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
I remember being on business in Houston (I believe the notoriously 'hot' Texas city) in early May where one night dropped into the low-40s. Everyone who was hosting the conference was apologetic, that it's usually nicer that time of the year, or so they claimed. It was quite cold, windy, and damp. Wasn't a fan.
You must be old. Because Houston CBD has only recorded a temp in the low 40s once during May: the monthly record low of 44F established in 1978. Now, the official weather station, housed in IAH airport well north of the city, did reach 42F in 2013...but that's the May record low for that station as well.

The hosts were certainly correct in their claims.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
It's just as "bright, lush, and gorgeous" in the spring here as there. There are super bright blue skies here too. It hurts my eyes without sunglasses.

Not sure which part of Texas you were in. Houston may be slightly more cloudy in the spring but Austin is usually a glorious sunshine that can't be beat. Then you add in the wildflowers and it's really hard to say any part of the country tops it, although New Orleans or Charleston during spring would be a top contender.
If you trust the sunshine averages, then Houston is sunnier than Austin for more of the spring season (i.e. 2/3 months, during April and especially May):
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austin,_Texas#Climate
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Houston#Climate
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Old 01-12-2018, 04:54 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,283,591 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
Bottom line, I wouldn't call May hot in Texas. Perhaps there are some hot days, but looking at the averages it seems rather pleasant but in practice it's unpredictable.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tams here View Post
You make me smile, cbach! I live in Austin! Been here a long time. I know what it's all about here in the spring! For me, the spring AND summers are so much prettier, vibrant and lush in the areas of the north Im familiar with. Mostly due to the fact there are more trees! Big trees! Miles and miles of rolling fields with wildflowers. You tend to paint with a broad brush with your limited exposure, it seems, of other areas up north and spring weather!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tams here View Post
Lol! You just tend to make sweeping generalizations, a lot. Spent half my life in the north. The weather extremes are just as crazy here in the spring. One day it's well into the 90's and below freezing the next. Killing all those nice green buds on the trees. It's nice here in the spring, sure. It's actually my favorite time of the year here. The whole 6-8 weeks of it. Come May dread sets in!
Nope, cBach is correct, spring is a very solid and stable season in Texas and rest of the South: perhaps the best springs in the country.

Jetstream influences retreat to the poles as you get into the warmer parts of the year. As a result, the South, compared to the North, sees far less occurences of spring cold and temperature swings, and with far less of a magnitude. The result is a more solid bloom season in the South, compared to the North.

The main weather extreme for the South during the season comes with tornado/severe weather threats, but even then, it's mainly for the northern, inland areas of the region where jet-stream influences are still strong enough (i.e. North/Panhandle Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, northern parts of MS, AL, etc). Coastal areas of the South, along with low-latitude inland areas (i.e. Central/South Texas and SE Georgia) are more dominated by higher atmospheric heights, which restrict (or even preclude) storm development: the result its lots of moist but sunshine-filled days.

Pretty much, the Desert Southwest is the only area of the CONUS that can rival the South regarding spring weather. The West Coast has the issue with cold waters, which combine with North Pacific High setups to induce lots of fog and low stratus just as the land is heating up (hence the "May Gray/June Gloom" deals).

Last edited by Texyn; 01-12-2018 at 05:11 PM..
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Old 01-12-2018, 04:55 PM
 
5,475 posts, read 2,308,578 times
Reputation: 16485
Winter changing to Spring? Especially now? Definitely not.
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Old 01-12-2018, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,905 posts, read 36,220,301 times
Reputation: 63553
Hey. Some people prefer the weather in the south, and in Texas, than weather in states further north. Some people prefer weather in states further north. Nothing anyone says to anyone else is going to change these preferences.
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