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Old 10-05-2017, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Aurora, Colorado
5,441 posts, read 8,143,275 times
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I don't like Winter much, but the transition from Winter > Spring and especially the transition from Summer > Fall is amazing too witness every year. I really can't imagine not having a real Fall each year. I bet places like Miami, Phoenix, and LA don't feel nearly as festive because of their warm weather.
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Old 10-05-2017, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,849 posts, read 7,793,965 times
Reputation: 9469
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
How exactly would any of those cities truly benefit from growing coconuts?
I guess if youre going to live in such a nasty climate, you may as well have coconuts?
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Old 10-05-2017, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,745,723 times
Reputation: 8803
Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
Yeah it can be much cooler in the shade. Growing up it could be 100 degree outside but if you go down to the river it drops 10-15 degrees. Also nights cool off much more, at higher altitudes, even more so.
Man that sounds far better than here. It does absolutely not get cooler at night here.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turnerbro View Post
I'd say yes and no. On one hand I do like seeing visible change of seasons outside. On the other hand I don't like having to prepare for it. Yeah October in the mid-atlantic can be frustrating. 40 in the morning 80 in the afternoon isn't uncommon.
Same here. I think the whole SE and east coast have terrible weather.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIG CATS View Post
You say I exaggerate, then go on to verify that we get nasty humid at times.
A handful of days isn't much at all. We're like that year-round.
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Old 10-05-2017, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,919 posts, read 6,844,411 times
Reputation: 5838
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
Which would be the case for all those cities if the occasional cold snaps were eliminated.

For one, their soil temperature regimes end up falling into the hyperthermic zone, which is the same as South Florida:
http://passel.unl.edu/Image/Martha/T...America-LG.jpg
Plant and Soil Sciences eLibrary

Not only that, but in times when cold-fronts aren't coming through (which was the case for much of Winter 2016-2017), these three cities see quite a bit of winter days where nighttime lows stay above 16C. The all-round general temperature profiles for these cities are more than warm enough for coconuts, the only handicaps are the occasional cold snaps.



How would they not?
How are you getting there? The normal Jan means in these three cities are about 11 to 12C. You don't get a 16C soil temp with means like that
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Old 10-06-2017, 12:30 AM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,277,280 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
How are you getting there? The normal Jan means in these three are about 11 to 12C. You don't get a 16C soil temp with means like that
How are you not getting there? That's right, you keep referencing averages that have numerous cold fronts factored in. Whereas my point was, if such handicaps were eliminated, the winter soil temps would be solidly warm enough to sustain coconuts, comfortably above 16C. Because as I've explained:
-Even with coldfronts, the average year-round soil temperatures of the three cities remain quite warm, to be in the same zone as South Florida.
-These three cities already feature very balmy winter nights when cold fronts aren't coming through (i.e. zonal jetstream flow); nighttime lows can be above 14C, even near 20C.

So while coconuts are unable to be grown in these three cities, they are basically at paper-thin distances to achieving such a feat.
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Old 10-06-2017, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,919 posts, read 6,844,411 times
Reputation: 5838
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
How are you not getting there? That's right, you keep referencing averages that have numerous cold fronts factored in. Whereas my point was, if such handicaps were eliminated, the winter soil temps would be solidly warm enough to sustain coconuts, comfortably above 16C. Because as I've explained:
-Even with coldfronts, the average year-round soil temperatures of the three cities remain quite warm, to be in the same zone as South Florida.
-These three cities already feature very balmy winter nights when cold fronts aren't coming through (i.e. zonal jetstream flow); nighttime lows can be above 14C, even near 20C.

So while coconuts are unable to be grown in these three cities, they are basically at paper-thin distances to achieving such a feat.
Phoenix would get there before the other three, and we aren't there. Some warm days do not a climate make
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Old 10-06-2017, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Jackson, Mississippi
204 posts, read 162,616 times
Reputation: 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by tman7117 View Post
Not to say that it's wrong to like a change of seasons, but I personally don't see why people like it so much.
Living in the New York metro area, an area that gets 4 very distinct seasons, I can't stand it. Especially the change from summer to fall when it's that awkward point in late September/October and you don't know what to where because it's 40 degrees in the morning and 75 by 1 in the afternoon. Don't even get me started on winter. I'd rather have a year long summer/warm climate like So.Cal or Texas/Florida

Anyone else feel this way?
I sure do!

I live in Mississippi, which isn't too bad as far as the extremes between seasons goes, but I cringe every time I hear someone say "I love the fact we have four seasons down here." I like mild humidity (not absence of humidity), little change day to day in temperature and humidity and rainfall, mild rainfall, few thunderstorms, and generally a year round average of about 69 degrees. I like the climate in Mississippi only in the Fall, where it remains relatively dry. I can't stand the humidity in the rest of the year, and even in our mild winters I find myself rather cold. I'd be willing to tolerate the humidity and the warmth in the summers in Bermuda because it appears (from climate data) to be rather pleasant most of the rest of the year.
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Old 10-06-2017, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Mars City
5,091 posts, read 2,136,536 times
Reputation: 7505
It's hard to say they are "overrated". Some people like variety, some like less change. This varies with people, and there's no right or wrong answer.

It's best that people do want different preferences, or everyone would be clustered together in the same areas, and the rest of the country would be void and unused. Instead of looking down on those who like the "change of the seasons", we should be glad if they're different from us. It's a plus and a positive.
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Old 10-06-2017, 10:13 AM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,452 posts, read 1,277,280 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Phoenix would get there before the other three, and we aren't there. Some warm days do not a climate make
Actually, it would not.

While Phoenix isn't inconvenienced by cold snaps like the Southern US cities are, it also never sees the sheer warmth that those cities see (particularly nighttime lows) when cold snaps aren't present (i.e. zonal flow). Such warmth is no surprise, given the torrid Gulf/South Atlantic. That means if the risk of cold snaps were to be eliminated in the South, those warm waters would have near 100% influence over the winter climate (but not full, as there's some occasional Pacific flow from the subtropical jet).

See for yourself the natural winter warmth the Southern cities experience when there are no cold front passages. The 1981-2017 average number of days in the winter season where nighttime lows are at or above 60F. Range numbers account for different airports:

Phoenix: 1 day
Yuma: 1 day
National Weather Service - NWS Phoenix

Houston: 10-12 days
National Weather Service Climate

New Orleans: 11-12 days
National Weather Service Climate

Jacksonville: 6-11 days
National Weather Service Climate


Think about it: if Coastal South can see such warmth when cold fronts aren't coming through, then it's obvious that the warmth would be what remains if an E/W barrier were to eliminate cold snaps. Resulting in them being coconut palm zones that would far outclass anything offered in the Western US.
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Old 10-06-2017, 10:57 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,720,777 times
Reputation: 30796
Quote:
Originally Posted by westbymidwest View Post

His original point was that people who live in these climates are 'tougher'; mine was that this doesn't hold true for much of the native population. Anyways, it's a silly argument to begin with. We all ought to be grateful for the variance in climate preferences; if everyone in America preferred to live in the same places most of us would be priced out.
I didn't mean that people who merely live in 4-season climates are tougher, I tried to show that people who embrace 4-season climates are tougher.

A person who lives through a Wisconsin winter by huddling inside with the thermostat set at 75F is not tough, but the Wisconsinite who goes ice skating on the lake or skiing in the hills and comes home to a thermostat set at 62F is tougher.

Likewise when it gets hot and humid in July, the person who spends every waking hour on the couch in freezing A/C just watching TV is not as tough as the ones who pack some water and go hiking, or play basketball, or pull weeds and trim trees.

Getting out and experiencing the weather, especially at the extremes of the year, allows one's body to adapt, just as one's body adapts to exercise.

If you go to the gym, but just sit on a piece of equipment and do nothing, when it comes time to lift that weight or run that 3 miles, its going to hurt. Most people who complain about the cold of winter or heat of summer are those who put off even the mildest discomfort by playing with the thermostat.

I have noticed the same thing with rain. I have know people, both from the desert and rainy climes, who have so conscientiously avoided rain, and even vilified it, that the merest sprinkle dampening their shoulders is treated like some kind of torture, whereas kids who were told to go out and play in the rain see getting soaked as a temporary inconvenience.
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