U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 10-10-2017, 05:15 AM
 
377 posts, read 202,265 times
Reputation: 349

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Probably because that would mean moving to Canada lol (or Alaska)
Juneau, Alaska is closer to the equator than Stockholm, Sweden. And the climate of Juneau is similar to many areas of Scotland.

If the person hates warmth, sunshine and desires to live in the environment of his ancestors, Alaska is his obvious ideal location.

Cities at latitude of 45N - 50N are like Milan, Italy or Lyon, France. Hardly the stereotype of Northern Europe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-10-2017, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,581 posts, read 17,567,761 times
Reputation: 27672
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
In the Ohio Valley you can go months in winter with few clear days, but little snow. Plenty of fog, rain, drizzle, sleet, and freezing rain, though. When I lived in Wisconsin there were a few very cold winters, the one that comes to mind was 2013-14, then I moved south a year later for a new position.
That was what killed me about living in Indianapolis. My family, being from Tennessee, thought the problem would be the cold and snow. Honestly, we tend to get more snow here, especially at higher elevations, and handle it poorly.

With that said, we also get a lot more winter sun than in Indianapolis. November often go to be so wet/muddy you didn't want to be outside hiking or anything. It really didn't get better until March. The winter months made me stir crazy there with the lack of sun.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2017, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,581 posts, read 17,567,761 times
Reputation: 27672
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
I lived there for 9 years, right downwind of Lake Superior in the lake effect snowbelts. I also spent many years in lower Michigan so I do have real upper midwestern life experiences. Actually snow in October and April is common in the UP. Snow in May and September is uncommon so I did not list them, although I have seen both. If you live in MSP I know snow is not as common there as it is in the Michigan snowbelts. Minnesota is a bit colder than Michigan because of the lakes, but because of the lakes Michigan is snowier.
To me, if snow is common in a certain month, that month is functionally winter.

January in Tampa may be calendar winter, but is not "winter" in the figurative sense many people think of it. Likewise, a November full of snow in the UP is winter behavior, even if the calendar does not yet say winter.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2017, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,523 posts, read 7,463,600 times
Reputation: 10927
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
To me, if snow is common in a certain month, that month is functionally winter.

January in Tampa may be calendar winter, but is not "winter" in the figurative sense many people think of it. Likewise, a November full of snow in the UP is winter behavior, even if the calendar does not yet say winter.
Under your definition then "functional winter" in most of Michigan begins in November and ends in April. This is one of the reasons I do not want to live up there. Michigan is a wonderful place to visit during summer and the first half of falll but it's cold season is to extreme and too long for me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2017, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,797 posts, read 36,172,094 times
Reputation: 63457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grizzly Addams View Post
And the window for 80 degrees is late March to early October, does that also qualify for six months of summer?
lol 80 degrees isn't summer. That's early spring or late fall.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2017, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,857 posts, read 2,984,533 times
Reputation: 3399
Dallas looks to still be in the 90's this weekend. Incredible.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2017, 05:57 AM
 
377 posts, read 202,265 times
Reputation: 349
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
Dallas looks to still be in the 90's this weekend. Incredible.
That's normal for them. October is generally hot there, but they will get a couple of chilly days, and then rebound. It's November when the 'summer' pattern there finally ends.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2017, 06:14 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,581 posts, read 17,567,761 times
Reputation: 27672
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Under your definition then "functional winter" in most of Michigan begins in November and ends in April. This is one of the reasons I do not want to live up there. Michigan is a wonderful place to visit during summer and the first half of falll but it's cold season is to extreme and too long for me.
Yep, you may have some nice days interspersed with mostly bad ones, but frequent chances of snow during a certain month make me call that month a winter month.

If it's reliably snowing in April, I don't want to be there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2017, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
37,116 posts, read 45,641,400 times
Reputation: 61751
I think of the NC mountains, although its still very hot there in the summer. The Midwest has great summers, but its so gray all winter. No place is perfect.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2017, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,868,792 times
Reputation: 5856
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
That's normal for them. October is generally hot there, but they will get a couple of chilly days, and then rebound. It's November when the 'summer' pattern there finally ends.
The normal high in Dallas today is 79 and hasn't been 90 since September 13th, so not quite normal anymore
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top