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Old 10-21-2017, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,381,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
New Mexico's high desert area has four seasons. We have a dusting of snow on occasion that melts/evaporates in a few hours. Fall is gorgeous -- especially when the Aspens and Cottonwoods turn gold as they are now. Summer can get as hot as 100 degrees for a couple days in June but with low humidity it is not like other places. I've seen the humidity registered at 4% but 20-30% is more common. The heat won't get you but the sun will...almost always sunny and at 5,000 ft. it will scorch you if you are not prepared. Drink water, wear a hat. Monsoon season is usually a few weeks in July/August but always patchy. You might see rain every day but not get any. Spring starts early and stays late. We have a windy season for a few weeks in the spring - maybe three days a week with wind. Daytime temps in the winter and late fall are variable. You start off with a coat, switch to a jacket, then a sweater, then shirtsleeves and then go back again...eventually all your coats and jackets are riding around in the back seat of your car. This is desert/mountain geography so there are a lot of variations and micro-climates even in a relatively small area.
If I was to live in a desert environment I would pick New Mexico, for sure. West Texas is pretty nice too, you get similar weather with more humidity and rain, and a change of seasons too. Used to live out there. That's if you want four seasons with not so much of ice and snow and more of heat and sun.
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Old 10-21-2017, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Michigan
55 posts, read 45,513 times
Reputation: 64
I am also a fan of a four-seasons climate, but I think I'm ready for a little less snow, and a little more sunshine.

I live in Southern Michigan and have been thinking about retirement lately. I have been reading a LOT. I have spent five years in Oklahoma City, visited Dallas, TX, have vacationed numerous times in Fort Myers, FL and also stayed for a couple of sweltering weeks on Kiawah Island, SC, as well as spent time in Baltimore, MD and Northern New Jersey. I have travelled thru Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, Indiana, Missouri, and the beautiful state of Pennsylvania. My current job takes me throughout the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, as well as frequent trips into Northern Ohio and Northern Indiana. I have experienced more than a few places, but there are still many more to see, in particular, the Western States of New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, and the Rogue River Valley of Oregon.

So far, my conclusions are that a small to mid-size town that is within 30 minutes of a big city, West of the Appalachian Mountains, East of the Mississippi River, South of the latitude line which bisects Columbus, OH and Indianapolis, IN, and North of Tennessee might suit my needs. Too much rain in Tennessee? My God, that state gets almost 50" of rain, with a lot of it coming down in the summer months - that is a concern.
Southern Indiana, just North of Evansville, IN or Louisville, KY sounds nice. This area looks like it provides 8 months of weather with average daily high temps of 60 or higher and average daily low temps of 40 or higher. I would be lessening my yearly snowfall from 42" to somewhere around 12", while still enjoying a four-seasons climate. You have to have the bad to truly appreciate the good. Everything in moderation. Let the tornadoes blow... After living in Southern Michigan most of my life, and watching 13 tornadoes race thru Oklahoma City, OK in ONE day back in the early 80s, I think I can handle the occasional twister - as long as it doesn't knock out my satellite dish. ;-)
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Old 10-21-2017, 09:04 PM
 
6,553 posts, read 13,750,608 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyJoe View Post
I am also a fan of a four-seasons climate, but I think I'm ready for a little less snow, and a little more sunshine.

I live in Southern Michigan and have been thinking about retirement lately. I have been reading a LOT. I have spent five years in Oklahoma City, visited Dallas, TX, have vacationed numerous times in Fort Myers, FL and also stayed for a couple of sweltering weeks on Kiawah Island, SC, as well as spent time in Baltimore, MD and Northern New Jersey. I have travelled thru Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, Indiana, Missouri, and the beautiful state of Pennsylvania. My current job takes me throughout the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, as well as frequent trips into Northern Ohio and Northern Indiana. I have experienced more than a few places, but there are still many more to see, in particular, the Western States of New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, and the Rogue River Valley of Oregon.

So far, my conclusions are that a small to mid-size town that is within 30 minutes of a big city, West of the Appalachian Mountains, East of the Mississippi River, South of the latitude line which bisects Columbus, OH and Indianapolis, IN, and North of Tennessee might suit my needs. Too much rain in Tennessee? My God, that state gets almost 50" of rain, with a lot of it coming down in the summer months - that is a concern.
Southern Indiana, just North of Evansville, IN or Louisville, KY sounds nice. This area looks like it provides 8 months of weather with average daily high temps of 60 or higher and average daily low temps of 40 or higher. I would be lessening my yearly snowfall from 42" to somewhere around 12", while still enjoying a four-seasons climate. You have to have the bad to truly appreciate the good. Everything in moderation. Let the tornadoes blow... After living in Southern Michigan most of my life, and watching 13 tornadoes race thru Oklahoma City, OK in ONE day back in the early 80s, I think I can handle the occasional twister - as long as it doesn't knock out my satellite dish. ;-)
Louisville's Indiana suburbs are just so charming .Check out Floyds Knobs, IN and downtown New Albany.

Also downtown Jeffersonville is so charming by the waterfront. Evansville? Blah. Its a run down, meth town kind of place.
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Old 10-21-2017, 11:22 PM
 
Location: Michigan
55 posts, read 45,513 times
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Thanks for the tip! I've been checking out smaller towns north of Louisville, like Salem, Scottsburg, Charlestown, and Madison. I've read nice things about Madison in particular, and Charlestown looks like a good option. Also, I'm planning on doing some more research on Clarksville, as well as the cities that you have suggested, Floyd's Knobs, New Albany, and Jeffersonville. It's great to see someone say nice things about what looks like, from the outside, a great area. I have requested a Southern Indiana Visitor's Publication, signed up for online monthly updates on the areas events, and need to check out the websites of these cities and towns. Obviously, a staycation or two would be very informative. Thanks again for the information. There is nothing like feedback from someone who has experienced things first-hand. The Louisville, KY area, give or take, just seems like a natural fit.
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Old 10-22-2017, 10:32 AM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,937,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
I lived there for 9 years, right downwind of Lake Superior in the lake effect snowbelts. I also spent many years in lower Michigan so I do have real upper midwestern life experiences. Actually snow in October and April is common in the UP. Snow in May and September is uncommon so I did not list them, although I have seen both. If you live in MSP I know snow is not as common there as it is in the Michigan snowbelts. Minnesota is a bit colder than Michigan because of the lakes, but because of the lakes Michigan is snowier.
Speaking of the Lake Superior Snowbelt, I am most familiar with Vilas County, WI- especially outside of the touristy areas of Eagle River. I have done most trails in the county at all times of the year, seen snow in May and September there and lows in the 20s in June. Too many city people from Milwaukee and Chicago have 2nd homes there so real estate prices are inflated. I prefer the more remote northern portions such as Presque Isle, Winchester, Land O'Lakes, Phelps, Conover, Boulder Junction, etc. City people generally don't go up there in the winter, but locals know too always expect snowmobiles crossing frequently on roads, usually by a tavern or supper club of course.
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Old 10-22-2017, 09:05 PM
 
6,553 posts, read 13,750,608 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyJoe View Post
Thanks for the tip! I've been checking out smaller towns north of Louisville, like Salem, Scottsburg, Charlestown, and Madison. I've read nice things about Madison in particular, and Charlestown looks like a good option. Also, I'm planning on doing some more research on Clarksville, as well as the cities that you have suggested, Floyd's Knobs, New Albany, and Jeffersonville. It's great to see someone say nice things about what looks like, from the outside, a great area. I have requested a Southern Indiana Visitor's Publication, signed up for online monthly updates on the areas events, and need to check out the websites of these cities and towns. Obviously, a staycation or two would be very informative. Thanks again for the information. There is nothing like feedback from someone who has experienced things first-hand. The Louisville, KY area, give or take, just seems like a natural fit.
Floyds Knobs is the pick of the litter. Picturesque views, rolling hills, even city skyline views on Skyline drive. Very educated and good schools but feels rural even though its "suburban."

Clarksville is one big strip mall. A good place to big box shop but that's it. If you like old, urban, walkable, historic small towns, New Albany and Jeffersonville are your choices.

Scottsburg is a dump...avoid at all costs. Charlestown is seeing lots of new home growth...its a decent more suburban option, close to the amenities, shopping, and hospitals of east Louisville across the Lincoln bridge.


Madison is a BEAUTIFUL, picturesque town, but its surrounded with too many meth problems. Its simply too remote of a small town. The areas I listed above benefit from being small towns but being suburbs of Louisville. if your heart really loves Madison, I'd recommend living in eastern Jeffersonville or Charlestown and taking weekend trips up to Madison.
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Old 10-23-2017, 09:05 AM
 
2,789 posts, read 1,631,167 times
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Maryland has pretty consistent 4 seasons.
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Old 10-23-2017, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Somerville, MA
8,001 posts, read 16,052,716 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CastletonSnob1 View Post
I'm thinking about moving to a state where you get four distinct seasons. What are the best states to go?
I think that given personalities and preferences, even the states with 4 distinct seasons don't to EVERYTHING perfectly for each person. For example, If you like comfortable summers and great weather/foliage in the fall, New England is great. However, if you want a milder winter and a great spring, the mid-Atlantic is probably the better choice. Particularly DC which has the best spring of any area in the country in my opinion. New England winters are cold and spring is called "mud season" in much of the region.
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Old 10-23-2017, 03:40 PM
 
Location: DFW
6,796 posts, read 11,765,661 times
Reputation: 5149
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
My preferred latitude is in the 45-50N range, so most places in the US are generally too far south for what I prefer in terms of sun angle. Of course I am targeting Seattle, Twin Cities, and Portland for positions down the road as those are the only three major cities along and north of 45N latitude. The Gulf Coast is a no go zone for me, too much heat and humidity.
Portland and Seattle would be ideal in this latitude range for 4 seasons, despite what many would say. Portland has similar average temperatures as Paris with greater summer and winter extremes and yet, Paris is considered a city with 4 seasons so you shouldn't go wrong with Portland (or Seattle.)

The twin cities would be too biased towards winter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
I disagree. If the winter is full of bare deciduous trees and it gets cold enough for occasional frost and snow then its still a winter even if it doesn't snow much. I'd say about half of Texas has a 4 seasons climate. There's no mistaking North Texas in November, January or April for summer that's for sure. If the landscape changes noticeably enough its got seasons.
Most of California more than, say, 20 miles away from the coast is like this. You do see leaves changing colors and the occasional frost and even the very occasional snowflake or dusting of snow.

Last edited by ragnarkar; 10-23-2017 at 03:49 PM..
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Old 10-23-2017, 05:03 PM
 
5,112 posts, read 2,749,174 times
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Asheville NC or Knox Tn are great options in the east.
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