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Old 10-09-2017, 03:29 PM
 
Location: IN
20,863 posts, read 35,992,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
I have lived with both, currently live in the humid warm southeast. If you accept your climate and embrace it then you can enjoy living in either environment. Upper midwesterners who are happy learn to enjoy winter, snowmobiles, ice fishing and skiing are multiple ways to do this. Here in the south you take advantage of long seasons of outdoor life, spend time by the water, sipping sweet tea on the porch etc. Climate is what you make it.
The Lower Midwest and Upper South are the worst in terms of not being able to be outdoors due to: heat/humidity/brutal sun angle June-September and constant rain/damp/little snow November-March. I like be outdoors in the winter with plenty of snow, and you can't do anything with 35F and rain unless you travel elsewhere where there is snow.
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Old 10-09-2017, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Sweet Home Chicago!
5,189 posts, read 3,729,105 times
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Anywhere in the Midwest. or Denver. Take your pick.
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Old 10-09-2017, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,523 posts, read 7,477,679 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
The Lower Midwest and Upper South are the worst in terms of not being able to be outdoors due to: heat/humidity/brutal sun angle June-September and constant rain/damp/little snow November-March. I like be outdoors in the winter with plenty of snow, and you can't do anything with 35F and rain unless you travel elsewhere where there is snow.
In Tennessee I do a lot of winter hiking. It is rarely 35 and raining, the average January high is 48, obviously some days warmer and some colder. I understand your preference for a snowy cold winter, but our winters in the south are not as you say they are.
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Old 10-09-2017, 07:31 PM
 
2,798 posts, read 1,652,843 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grizzly Addams View Post
Not at all. Winter is Dec to Feb, in an unlucky year it stretches into March which is usually just an occasional snow storm, but the temps are starting rise at that point. If you want distinct 4 seasons (that is, a real winter), the North is where you get it.
Uh I think we might have different definitions of winter. To me anytime when it's uncomfortable to not wear a jacket outside during midday is winter.
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Old 10-09-2017, 07:33 PM
 
2,798 posts, read 1,652,843 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
The Lower Midwest and Upper South are the worst in terms of not being able to be outdoors due to: heat/humidity/brutal sun angle June-September and constant rain/damp/little snow November-March. I like be outdoors in the winter with plenty of snow, and you can't do anything with 35F and rain unless you travel elsewhere where there is snow.
I'd have to disagree with the upper south, plenty of places have reasonable winters, long spring and falls. Summers can be bad but not nearly as bad as the gulf coast and generally not much worse than the mid-west.
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Old 10-09-2017, 08:09 PM
 
Location: IN
20,863 posts, read 35,992,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
In Tennessee I do a lot of winter hiking. It is rarely 35 and raining, the average January high is 48, obviously some days warmer and some colder. I understand your preference for a snowy cold winter, but our winters in the south are not as you say they are.
In the Ohio Valley you can go months in winter with few clear days, but little snow. Plenty of fog, rain, drizzle, sleet, and freezing rain, though. When I lived in Wisconsin there were a few very cold winters, the one that comes to mind was 2013-14, then I moved south a year later for a new position.
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Old 10-09-2017, 08:11 PM
 
Location: IN
20,863 posts, read 35,992,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turnerbro View Post
I'd have to disagree with the upper south, plenty of places have reasonable winters, long spring and falls. Summers can be bad but not nearly as bad as the gulf coast and generally not much worse than the mid-west.
My preferred latitude is in the 45-50N range, so most places in the US are generally too far south for what I prefer in terms of sun angle. Of course I am targeting Seattle, Twin Cities, and Portland for positions down the road as those are the only three major cities along and north of 45N latitude. The Gulf Coast is a no go zone for me, too much heat and humidity.
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Old 10-09-2017, 09:52 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,523 posts, read 7,477,679 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
In the Ohio Valley you can go months in winter with few clear days, but little snow. Plenty of fog, rain, drizzle, sleet, and freezing rain, though. When I lived in Wisconsin there were a few very cold winters, the one that comes to mind was 2013-14, then I moved south a year later for a new position.
This is true, Ohio, Indiana, northern Kentucky and Illinois do have some real dismal months IMO. It sounds like you belong in the upper Midwest, Green Bay, Traverse City, Duluth or MSP have the climate your post suggest you prefer.
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Old 10-10-2017, 05:08 AM
 
377 posts, read 203,013 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
My preferred latitude is in the 45-50N range, so most places in the US are generally too far south for what I prefer in terms of sun angle. Of course I am targeting Seattle, Twin Cities, and Portland for positions down the road as those are the only three major cities along and north of 45N latitude. The Gulf Coast is a no go zone for me, too much heat and humidity.
Why is that your ideal latitude? Northern Europeans live somewhere from 50N to 65N.
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Old 10-10-2017, 05:09 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,897,970 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
Why is that your ideal latitude? Northern Europeans live somewhere from 50N to 65N.
Probably because that would mean moving to Canada lol (or Alaska)
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