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Old 10-11-2017, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Lil Rhodey
684 posts, read 466,714 times
Reputation: 948

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big sky, open spaces, wilderness, mountains, cold
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Old 10-11-2017, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,582 posts, read 3,722,675 times
Reputation: 4158
Huge distances between cities. Areas of beautiful scenery followed by dull scenery. Pine trees in the west, brown landscape in the east. Wide open freeways with many ignoring the speed limit. (that goes way back, but another thread). Big gap between the rich and poor. Cowboys and Cowgirls. Short hot summers, long cold winters. About a hundred different Montana license plates on the road. Small casinos and "souvenir" stores at almost every freeway exit.
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Old 10-12-2017, 10:21 AM
Status: "Be yourself. What's the alternative?" (set 28 days ago)
 
8,744 posts, read 10,865,840 times
Reputation: 12796
Wide open spaces and people who do their own thing.
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Old 10-12-2017, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,093 posts, read 5,945,205 times
Reputation: 30347
Lots of wild animals, numerous birds etc.

Is it true?
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Old 10-12-2017, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Calera, AL
1,166 posts, read 1,449,175 times
Reputation: 1574
To me, Montana seems pristine and untouched compared to most of the rest of the Western states. It doesn't have any large population centers (Billings is the largest city, but it's still barely half the size of the Sioux Falls and Fargo metros, and less than a third of the size of Boise) but I think the people that live there like it that way. It's probably the one state that comes closest to giving people an idea of what life was like in the Wild West of the 1880s through the 1920s - yes, the technology may have changed, but the character of the people and the land have not. The eastern part is high plains, the western is rugged and mountainous. The mountainous portions of the state have an alpine/subarctic climate, where cold/snow can occur at any time of the year, but the eastern part of the state has surprisingly mild winters. Don't get me wrong, they're still cold with some snow, but they resemble winters in Denver or Rapid City more than say, Minneapolis. In other words, when the snow falls, more often than not it either doesn't stick, or melts fairly quickly.

Missoula is one of the most underappreciated college towns in the region - it has a vibe much more reminiscent of Boulder or Eugene (and at approximately 80K, it's only somewhat smaller than either) than Laramie or Pullman.
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Old 10-12-2017, 11:05 AM
 
16,720 posts, read 14,731,533 times
Reputation: 41134
Nicholas Evans. The stories in his books are based there.

Wide, open spaces. Real mountains. Yellowstone. Big game hunting.

Cowboys.
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Old 10-12-2017, 11:19 AM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,839 posts, read 1,318,119 times
Reputation: 3223
Quote:
Originally Posted by convextech View Post
Nicholas Evans. The stories in his books are based there.

Wide, open spaces. Real mountains. Yellowstone. Big game hunting.

Cowboys.
Yellowstone is almost entirely in Wyoming, although the edges do go into Idaho and Montana.
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Old 10-12-2017, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Brew City
4,281 posts, read 2,533,927 times
Reputation: 5790
College, wedding, kids, 1st house, adventure
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Old 10-12-2017, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Mars City
5,091 posts, read 2,155,388 times
Reputation: 7505
Lots of open space, harsh winters, not much culture beyond the land lubbers / farmers / cowboys. Not a brainpower or innovation state.
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Old 10-12-2017, 02:48 PM
 
Location: 406
1,423 posts, read 1,545,472 times
Reputation: 1407
Quote:
Originally Posted by fezzador View Post
To me, Montana seems pristine and untouched compared to most of the rest of the Western states. It doesn't have any large population centers (Billings is the largest city, but it's still barely half the size of the Sioux Falls and Fargo metros, and less than a third of the size of Boise) but I think the people that live there like it that way. It's probably the one state that comes closest to giving people an idea of what life was like in the Wild West of the 1880s through the 1920s - yes, the technology may have changed, but the character of the people and the land have not. The eastern part is high plains, the western is rugged and mountainous. The mountainous portions of the state have an alpine/subarctic climate, where cold/snow can occur at any time of the year, but the eastern part of the state has surprisingly mild winters. Don't get me wrong, they're still cold with some snow, but they resemble winters in Denver or Rapid City more than say, Minneapolis. In other words, when the snow falls, more often than not it either doesn't stick, or melts fairly quickly.

Missoula is one of the most underappreciated college towns in the region - it has a vibe much more reminiscent of Boulder or Eugene (and at approximately 80K, it's only somewhat smaller than either) than Laramie or Pullman.
A few minor corrections:

Billings (pop. 110,000) is nearly the same size as Fargo, about half the size of Boise and only about 30% smaller than Sioux Falls; Missoula, on the other hand, is over twice the size of Laramie and Pullman.

The character of Montanans in general, lifestyle Cowboys included (the few remaining, that is) has changed enormously with advances in technology, and it would be comically unrealistic to think otherwise. Montanans, I always say, are Americans, for better and worse.

Whatever romantic ideals Montana embodies along the lines of a "wild west" image is a consequence of marketing and very, very strange politics.
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