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Old 03-18-2008, 04:28 PM
 
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DC is basically recession proof. That's why we have four of the richest counties in the US in our metro.
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Old 03-18-2008, 04:31 PM
 
583 posts, read 1,139,984 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
I just love snobbery. Basically something that doesn't meet your rarefied standards of how people should live automatically discounts it, despite the OP's original question of which parts of the country are showing the most economic vitality.
You completely missed the point I was trying to bring up. If these areas show so much economic vitality then why is the real estate market there so depressed? Why are the execs of the large corporations moving to Texas, Arizona, aren't moving themselves? Why was it impossible to sell your house in Plano in 2005 when real estate was booming everywhere and large corporations were opening new offices around that area left and right? These are just the things I observed from my own experience. And based on that I disagree that these areas are undergoing any sort of economy boom and are soon to become 'the face of America'.

As far as snobbery is concerned. So you think that proclaiming one way of life as 'The Face of America' while saying the other way of living is 'so Old Century' is not snobbery? At least I am acknowledging that there are many ways to live in the US and there is a lot more to the 'face of America'.
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Old 03-18-2008, 05:03 PM
 
28,905 posts, read 46,738,716 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KT13 View Post
You completely missed the point I was trying to bring up. If these areas show so much economic vitality then why is the real estate market there so depressed? Why are the execs of the large corporations moving to Texas, Arizona, aren't moving themselves? Why was it impossible to sell your house in Plano in 2005 when real estate was booming everywhere and large corporations were opening new offices around that area left and right? These are just the things I observed from my own experience. And based on that I disagree that these areas are undergoing any sort of economy boom and are soon to become 'the face of America'.

As far as snobbery is concerned. So you think that proclaiming one way of life as 'The Face of America' while saying the other way of living is 'so Old Century' is not snobbery? At least I am acknowledging that there are many ways to live in the US and there is a lot more to the 'face of America'.
And I quote:

"I certainly hope not If some of these new sprawly generic burbs with street malls and concrete corporate parks will become the face of America.. it will be very very sad. I hope there will be something other than sky-high gas prices to prevent it."

My word, the distaste drips from every syllable. Let's see, "generic" is your code word for "lacking personality," "concrete corporate parks" speaks to entire universe of architectural values that you do not hold, and "very very sad" kind of speaks for itself, don't you think?

Now, on to the other points you make. I live in a state that's becoming a relocation mecca for companies, due to relatively benevolent business atmosphere, lower overall salaries and taxes, lower power and water costs, and lower property costs. On my block alone, we have new neighbors from California, Washington, Michigan, and Ohio, all here because their companies relocated. And the executives relocated, too.

I work for a magazine publisher. And several years ago, we bought a publication out of San Francisco. We offered to move the entire staff here, and were turned down almost unanimously, except for two long-term staffers. Guess what? Half of those staffers have rejoined our publication, and have moved here--all because the West Coast job market had turned sour.

What's more, the real estate market isn't depressed. It's actually booming. It's just that a lot of cities in California and the Northeast had seen property increase to incredibly high levels, which then affects profitability for tenants. Rent 100,000 square feet of distribution space at $15 a sf vs. $3.50 a sf in the South, and it's a pretty easy business decision to make. That explains why California is showing a strong outbound flow over the past several years, as evidenced by the United Van Lines migration study, a report that has become a bellwether for such things.

I think my reaction has more to do with the undercurrent of your answer which basically poses the question, "who on earth would want to live there?"
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Old 03-18-2008, 06:34 PM
 
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Similarly, my reaction has to do with the undercurrent of the statement that some of the cities I like are "So last century", while the way of life I don't necessarily admire is proclaimed to be the new Face of America. It is sad to me because I've lived and worked in the fast growing suburbs for several years and can't wait to get out. I was one of these people who moved because the area was said to be 'booming' and initially sort of liked it, but now can't stand it any longer waiting to sell my house which unfortunately won't be soon due to the overall housing market slump. So, I am just expressing my opinion.

In terms of language used I hardly said anything that would not be otherwise read on these boards. My opinion is not as 'rarefied' as you state, just go ahead and read some of these general US boards about places people do and don't want to live in. Have you not heard 'generic street malls' or 'suburban sprawl'? I am sorry if this bothers you, but I am not the one who invented them and not the first one who'd used them in these forums.
The statement 'So last century' is not necessarily demure either and has quite a lot of meaning attached to it too. So, let's leave it at that, to each their own.
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Old 03-18-2008, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Chesterfield, MO
386 posts, read 1,537,025 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KT13 View Post
I certainly hope not If some of these new sprawly generic burbs with street malls and concrete corporate parks will become the face of America.. it will be very very sad. I hope there will be something other than sky-high gas prices to prevent it.

I seriously doubt there is any given city in the US that would qualify to call itself a 'face of America'. US is too much of a diverse country for that and there are places for different tastes. Thankfully.
Surprise! Surprise! Most Americans are much more concerned about a nice, safe, affordable place to raise their family than some swanky, upscale district in the middle of an expensive, dirty city. The face of America has been Dallas and Nashville for sometime....it's just taken people a while to realize it. It's amazing how blinding urban elitism can be!

Oh....and you'd be amazed how diverse the south is. Have you been to houston? That place is like Tripoli with a twang....
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Old 03-18-2008, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Seattle Area
3,455 posts, read 6,312,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WestCoDude View Post
Not even close. NoVa has a hot government-related job market. But it is, by most accounts, inflated. And NYC and Boston are two of the most economically stagnant areas. The most economically viable areas are those that actually promote population and job growth. Because Boston and NYC are so cost prohibitive to the middle class, no company will move there.

The reason Charlotte, Nashville, Houston, Dallas, Austin, and Atlanta are exploding is that they all offer cheap land, low taxes, and decent quality of life that attracts businesses and, consequently, people. NYC and Boston are great American cities. But they are SO last century. The face of America is in Nashville and Dallas.....
The U.S. is far too large for two cities to be called the "face of America".
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Old 03-18-2008, 08:29 PM
 
583 posts, read 1,139,984 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WestCoDude View Post
Surprise! Surprise! Most Americans are much more concerned about a nice, safe, affordable place to raise their family than some swanky, upscale district in the middle of an expensive, dirty city. The face of America has been Dallas and Nashville for sometime....it's just taken people a while to realize it. It's amazing how blinding urban elitism can be!

Oh....and you'd be amazed how diverse the south is. Have you been to houston? That place is like Tripoli with a twang....
I am not trying to downgrade South, I actually worked in Atlanta and I liked it, I had a good time there in Buckhead. I came to Dallas with the open mind and liked some of its areas, which were not surprisingly pretty expensive. I just found Plano, McKinney and other master planned affordable burbs to be very depressing, so what? If you like to live there, good for you, to each their own.

Yeah, I'd consider visiting, I love traveling, doubt I will love it if it's built up just like any other generic burb with cookie cutter houses, identical lawns and ugly street malls. But if it does have a flavor and a twang as you say, who knows, I may like it

I do wish though I'd bought in the "upscale district in the middle of an expensive, dirty city" instead of a wonderful nicely landscaped family oriented safe neighborhood I did instead. I'd had less competition selling it and more money renting it. I secretly hope what you are saying is true and I'll soon see less of these ever present 'for sale' signs in my wonderful safe and affordable family neighborhood. I am also not against having your own house and land. But I'd rather live in the woods than the master planned suburban hell where I have to collect signatures like some politician just to be able to re-landscape my own backyard.
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Old 11-09-2008, 12:15 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,016 times
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Cool best cities and states with jobs

Hello Everyone,

I wanted to know if anyone could tell me where I could get current information on cities and states with the best job market right now. Forbes magazine only has info starting in January and we all know that has changed. I am thinking about relocating,but it will be based on where the strongest economy is located as well as the condition of the real estate market. I live in Michigan and it is truly terrible here.
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Old 03-17-2010, 10:45 PM
 
10 posts, read 17,411 times
Reputation: 27
Default Raw income stats are misleading.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DC's Finest View Post
DC is basically recession proof. That's why we have four of the richest counties in the US in our metro.
You're not making the essential cost of living adjustment.
According to The Council For Community And Economic Research, the 5 counties with the highest real median household incomes are:

Williamson TN
Foryth GA
Fort Bend TX
Fayette GA
Howard MD

Real wealth is your true purchasing power not simply the amount of money you earn. You have to divide the income by the cost of living index to get an accurate measure of wealth.

It's a big suprise to many people that that many areas of the country which have been glamorized by the media as being wealthy are, in reality, quite poor.

For example; New York City and San Francisco rank near the bottom.

The media and Hollywood have also created the illusion that the Southeast is poor.

If you use the median household income and cost of living index stats provided by City-Data you'll get some real eye openers.

Here's some examples of medium household income divided by the cost of living index.

Boston 51,668/136.2 = 37,562
Virginia Beach 65,776/.883 = 74,492
Jackson MS 31,997/.832 = 38,46
New York City 51,116/177.1 = 28,879

I concede that the DC metro area is wealthy even when the cost of living to taken into account.
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Old 03-17-2010, 11:05 PM
 
3,448 posts, read 2,679,260 times
Reputation: 478
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wydrew9 View Post
i am shooting for the tampa/orlando area for the most part but i haven't even really considered texas. I dont know why, but prolly bc i have always liked that area a great deal. Oh and I will have a dual of mba in finance and a 4 year cpa in accounting.
Your not thinking :

- To advance in the feild of finance, you will learn that the largest positions of responsibility are held by those who have " moved around in
their career. ) approx every 3-6 yrs.
- The chief objective at your entry level , with noted education is to
determine the most respected and vibrant company possible
regardless of their location.
- For example : You follow above and within 18 months receive a terrific
promotion and are asked to move to an affiliate office . Where does this entertain your initial objective re local ?
This would be of course In finance, where you choose not to be self employed and working for an organization.
- It would be "far" more advantageous to accept a position of lower rank with a mega corporation in the middle of now-where than a
fancy title ranking with a mediocre corp in the most beautiful spot imaginable. Therefore pursue aforementioned in a exuastive search for the largest and healthiest corp to add to "future inevitable resume"
This opinion is submitted with regards to unstable economic
conditions, experience, common sense and because you asked.
Most of all......Good Luck !

Last edited by stargazzer; 03-17-2010 at 11:14 PM..
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