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Old 01-14-2019, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,729,281 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Southwestern? That could be the official state meal of South Carolina and no one would bat an eye--well maybe only because it doesn't include rice or some sort of seafood but otherwise that sounds typically Southern to me.
I was thinking it sounded pretty southeastern as well.
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Old 01-14-2019, 11:26 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,286 posts, read 3,501,481 times
Reputation: 4463
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
In spite of being aghast at what you call "seafood," yes, we did eat black eyed peas for the New Year - and cabbage as well!
Since we're both originally from the Midwest and half German, we go bi-regional with pork roast, sauerkraut, black eyed peas, mashed potatoes and cornbread with apple butter.

And I would be right at home with that Official Oklahoma meal!

I like catfish too, but I live for those trips to New England and that amazing seafood.
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Old 01-16-2019, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Washington DC
3,784 posts, read 3,295,692 times
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I mean. People in Atlanta and Orlando and the other cities don’t hate Yankees. I can’t tell you how the bumpkins feel. But I think they just hate California
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Old 01-16-2019, 06:05 PM
 
Location: SoCal
3,767 posts, read 2,551,535 times
Reputation: 2978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bass&Catfish2008 View Post
Fried clams? Lobster rolls? Gross.

That's why Okies could never be fully associated with the Deep South nor the Southern seaboard; our seafood palette is really just Fried Catfish (which we've perfected in Oklahoma...Bill's Catfish in Waurika!)! And I know that Fried Catfish does not count for the seafood purists.

We're much more Southwestern and the food proves it. Look at the official Okie state meal: The official state meal of Oklahoma consists of fried okra, cornbread, barbecue pork, squash, biscuits, sausage and gravy, grits, corn, strawberries (state fruit), chicken fried steak, pecan pie, and black-eyed peas.

By the way, I hope all y'all ate your black eyed peas for the New Year!
Sounds awesome my mouth is watering!!
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Old 01-19-2019, 08:10 AM
 
5,449 posts, read 2,289,752 times
Reputation: 16436
Southerners don't hate Northerners. At least Southerners today. I have a frail 90-year-old aunt, Muff, who refused to travel north of the Mason Dixon Line.

However, Southerners and Northerners are culturally different. Anybody who doesn't believe that is smoking crack. Southerners, for example, tend to be a little more indirect and diplomatic, often softening criticism. Meanwhile, Northerners tend to be more upfront. Both have their merits at times. No, it's not Rochester or Springfield, except with slower talking.

This is especially evident in business. I have a good friend who moved here from New York. He used to be my manager. Kind of a fire-breathing guy who had tons of talent. The first three months he was here, I would go with him to meetings and he would absolutely fall flat on his face in the presentations. He finally asked my opinion, and I told him.

Southerners tend to be more people-focused, which is why business meetings tend to begin with small talk. You know, the usual sports, weather, kids, kind of stuff. But do not think for a second that is shallow palaver. Instead, realize that's how they're sizing you up. They're taking the measure of you. They're making sure that you and they will get along. So the beginning of a Southern business meeting almost has the intricacies of a Japanese tea ceremony. Simply saying, "Okay, let's get started," is the equivalent of kicking things off with a loud, wet fart. Dave learned from it, and became a lot better at it. Even today, 25 years later, he still calls me up to ask advice.

Another time, I was asked to accompany a guy from New York to a presentation. I picked him up at the airport and was driving him to a family-owned business timber company two hours outside of town. I mean, this place was in the sticks.

The guy was kind of arrogant about Southerners. The ride to the plant was basically a two-hour monologue about how stupid Southerners were. We arrive at the mill and were led into a pine-paneled conference room festooned with pictures of hunting and fishing trips. The guy was curt to the receptionist and, while he wasn't exactly snickering at the hunting pictures, was telling me how weird it was. Hey, I don't like hunting myself, but I sure don't criticize those who do.

So the prospects file in. Honest to God, the sixtyish president was wearing overalls, mainly because he was out in the mill that morning. I took one look at this guy and thought, "Oh, please don't say anything stupid."

The introductions were made and the guy literally clapped his hands and said, "Okay. Let's get down to business." I watched four good old boys stiffen across the table from us. The guy proceeded to rattle off a thirty-page PowerPoint presentation.

The presentation ended, the lights went up, and the guy said, "Well, any questions?" in a tone that suggested he didn't expect any.

The guy in overalls sucked his teeth and said, "Well, I might just be an old country boy, but...." and proceeded to pick apart the guys presentation from memory, including numbers, forecasts, the whole shebang. It was a classic, highly polite takedown that ended with a friendly pat on the shoulder and an invitation to come back when he 'fiddled with the numbers.'

The guy got back into the car and said, "Wow. I didn't expect that." Well, it was a company with more than a $100 million in annual sales. The owner wasn't exactly a simpleton. He did come back and, chastened, had a much better presentation the second time around.
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Old 01-19-2019, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,100 posts, read 4,729,281 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by MinivanDriver View Post
Another time, I was asked to accompany a guy from New York to a presentation. I picked him up at the airport and was driving him to a family-owned business timber company two hours outside of town. I mean, this place was in the sticks.

The guy was kind of arrogant about Southerners. The ride to the plant was basically a two-hour monologue about how stupid Southerners were. We arrive at the mill and were led into a pine-paneled conference room festooned with pictures of hunting and fishing trips. The guy was curt to the receptionist and, while he wasn't exactly snickering at the hunting pictures, was telling me how weird it was. Hey, I don't like hunting myself, but I sure don't criticize those who do.

So the prospects file in. Honest to God, the sixtyish president was wearing overalls, mainly because he was out in the mill that morning. I took one look at this guy and thought, "Oh, please don't say anything stupid."

The introductions were made and the guy literally clapped his hands and said, "Okay. Let's get down to business." I watched four good old boys stiffen across the table from us. The guy proceeded to rattle off a thirty-page PowerPoint presentation.

The presentation ended, the lights went up, and the guy said, "Well, any questions?" in a tone that suggested he didn't expect any.

The guy in overalls sucked his teeth and said, "Well, I might just be an old country boy, but...." and proceeded to pick apart the guys presentation from memory, including numbers, forecasts, the whole shebang. It was a classic, highly polite takedown that ended with a friendly pat on the shoulder and an invitation to come back when he 'fiddled with the numbers.'

The guy got back into the car and said, "Wow. I didn't expect that." Well, it was a company with more than a $100 million in annual sales. The owner wasn't exactly a simpleton. He did come back and, chastened, had a much better presentation the second time around.
Sounds like that guy would be just as out of place in his own state. Sounds like an NYC/Albany sort of fellow who'd be lost in a town like Dundee or Canisteo. :P

Again I think it's more rural versus urban than north versus south. Don't get me wrong, there are inherent differences, but it's not THAT extreme. The biggest divide is always city-folk/country-folk. State can be nearly irrelevant to that.
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Old 01-19-2019, 11:20 AM
 
Location: San Francisco/East Bay and Los Angeles, formerly DC and Boston
2,138 posts, read 3,429,651 times
Reputation: 1811
The one thing I notice about the South vs. the North (and California), and especially among college educated Southerners, is identification with institutions. They hang flags of where they went to college, and you don't want to insult the QB of Wake Forest/UNC/Georgia Tech/Alabama/whatever SEC or ACC school they went to. Suburban Atlanta, Charlotte, and Nashville have a lot of these flags with college names hanging by the front door, and I've been to social events there where people have to let you know which school they went to. Not to brag, like a Northerner or Californian might, but because it's like going to NC State or Tennessee or Georgia is part of who they are.

They do the same with the large employer they work for. People I've met in nice Northside Atlanta suburbs who work for Georgia Pacific, IBM, Coca-Cola, or Delta wear it like it's part of who they are, just like their college. It's like the company is part of their identity, and they can't comprehend how we Californians change jobs all the time.

This also used to happen with their churches, but this seems to be dying down as the suburbs of larger southern cities become more diverse, especially with non-Christian South Asians.
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Old 01-19-2019, 12:50 PM
 
5,449 posts, read 2,289,752 times
Reputation: 16436
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheseGoTo11 View Post
The one thing I notice about the South vs. the North (and California), and especially among college educated Southerners, is identification with institutions. They hang flags of where they went to college, and you don't want to insult the QB of Wake Forest/UNC/Georgia Tech/Alabama/whatever SEC or ACC school they went to. Suburban Atlanta, Charlotte, and Nashville have a lot of these flags with college names hanging by the front door, and I've been to social events there where people have to let you know which school they went to. Not to brag, like a Northerner or Californian might, but because it's like going to NC State or Tennessee or Georgia is part of who they are.

They do the same with the large employer they work for. People I've met in nice Northside Atlanta suburbs who work for Georgia Pacific, IBM, Coca-Cola, or Delta wear it like it's part of who they are, just like their college. It's like the company is part of their identity, and they can't comprehend how we Californians change jobs all the time.

This also used to happen with their churches, but this seems to be dying down as the suburbs of larger southern cities become more diverse, especially with non-Christian South Asians.

Southerners are more rooted to place.
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Old 01-19-2019, 01:26 PM
 
793 posts, read 287,839 times
Reputation: 778
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheseGoTo11 View Post
The one thing I notice about the South vs. the North (and California), and especially among college educated Southerners, is identification with institutions. They hang flags of where they went to college, and you don't want to insult the QB of Wake Forest/UNC/Georgia Tech/Alabama/whatever SEC or ACC school they went to. Suburban Atlanta, Charlotte, and Nashville have a lot of these flags with college names hanging by the front door, and I've been to social events there where people have to let you know which school they went to. Not to brag, like a Northerner or Californian might, but because it's like going to NC State or Tennessee or Georgia is part of who they are.
.
Thatís news to me.
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Old 01-19-2019, 02:04 PM
Status: "Got the rocking modern neon sound" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Boston
2,027 posts, read 1,987,034 times
Reputation: 1719
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
Again I think it's more rural versus urban than north versus south. Don't get me wrong, there are inherent differences, but it's not THAT extreme. The biggest divide is always city-folk/country-folk. State can be nearly irrelevant to that.
Ehhh. Anecdotally, I feel like I relate better to folks from rural CT, ME, and NH as someone who grew up in Boston proper than I relate to folks from the city of Charlotte.
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