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Old 10-16-2017, 11:03 AM
 
21 posts, read 17,012 times
Reputation: 41

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Hi everybody.

I'm currently situated in Long Island, NY. We moved back from NC to NY to be closer to family and friends. Needless to say, rent and food are catching up. At this point, we can't pay all of our bills with the way things are going. There aren't many manufacturing jobs out here for him that pay decently. I'm in the Accounting/finance industry so I can pretty much find a job anywhere. We were looking to possibly move. However, we would search for jobs first before moving. We're interested in the following areas:

1. Orlando/Tampa, Florida: I did some research and rent is affordable. Wages aren't bad for the cost of living and it's growing. The warmer weather doesn't hurt either. Plus, we wouldn't have to pay state income tax. There is plenty to do.

2. Denver/Colorado Springs, Colorado: There are many manufacturing jobs available and at decent wages. Rent is reasonable starting at $730 from the places I looked at. That's lower than what we pay now and what we paid in NC. However, it's in the higher range of rent compared to the other places. The areas are booming.

3. Pittsburgh, PA: There are plenty of manufacturing jobs. I've heard public transportation is decent even though we have a car. Rent prices are affordable. It's the closest to NY if we want to visit family or friends. I don't think I would be a fan of the weather though.

4. Indianapolis, Indiana: My brother in law and nephews live there. Rent is cheap and there are plenty of jobs. I've heard that there isn't much to do though and the weather sucks.

5. Salt Lake City, Utah: Rent is reasonable. There are plenty of jobs, but I don't really know much about things to do. I've heard certain laws are somewhat strict.

We're looking for affordability, an abundance of manufacturing jobs, prefer warm weather, things to do (We're in our late 20's), work life balance, good education since we're thinking of having kids in the future, and pet friendly (2 cats). We also especially like an area with diverse food like NY.
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Old 10-16-2017, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,236 posts, read 24,407,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedelight21 View Post
2. Denver/Colorado Springs, Colorado: There are many manufacturing jobs available and at decent wages. Rent is reasonable starting at $730 from the places I looked at. That's lower than what we pay now and what we paid in NC. However, it's in the higher range of rent compared to the other places. The areas are booming.
Yes, wages are great out here for workers IMO.

However, you will not find anything for $730 in Denver, and $730 in Colorado Springs would be in the worst areas.

Expect a minimum of $1K/mo for something livable (1 bedroom) in Denver, and probably at least $850 in Colorado Springs.
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Old 10-16-2017, 11:47 AM
 
Location: The Springs
1,770 posts, read 2,136,680 times
Reputation: 1850
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedelight21 View Post
5. Salt Lake City, Utah: Rent is reasonable. There are plenty of jobs, but I don't really know much about things to do. I've heard certain laws are somewhat strict.
Completely overblown. Utah is a "conservative" state but is 99% just like the other 49. Interesting though, the mayor of Salt Lake City is a married democrat, female lesbian with a daughter. Aren't many places conservative or liberal that can say that. In fact, SLC hasn't elected a republican as mayor in over 50 years. Just a fun fact.
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Old 10-16-2017, 01:06 PM
 
21 posts, read 17,012 times
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So, what is the best place to move out of these choices or is there a place not on my list that I should keep in mind? What is there to do in Salt Lake City for a young couple?
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Old 10-16-2017, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Tampa Bay, Florida
82 posts, read 52,940 times
Reputation: 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedelight21 View Post
So, what is the best place to move out of these choices or is there a place not on my list that I should keep in mind? What is there to do in Salt Lake City for a young couple?
Hi there. I'm not a SLC resident, but I looked very extensively into Utah while considering a place to move, so I'll see if I can help.

I've visited Utah, staying with family in the very southwest corner, to the west of St. George, not far from the Arizona border. They did say that due to the liquor laws in Utah (and sometimes having to drive to find a place that sells alcohol), they prefer to drive into Arizona to stock up on wine / liquor. There is a large Mormon presence throughout the state, and I believe their conservative moral / family values play a large role in the generally strict alcohol policies, as well as a law (in some places at least) that mandates businesses be closed on Sundays. I've heard that the people in this state are some of the nicest there are, and that plenty of non-LDS people feel right at home and never feel pressured about their differences in faith.

What I found most amazing about the state was that we were surrounded by desert terrain but then we'd find ourselves swimming in a lake on a red-sand beach and next day hiking through trees, rivers and bamboo grass! Salt Lake City is a few hours north of where I visited, and up there it does get quite cold, and gets plenty of snow. It's near some great ski destinations. Ogden, which is just a little north of SLC, is rated one of the best places for families in the nation. The entire state is full of beautiful national & state parks and has one of the healthiest populations.

Other than hiking, skiing and other outdoorsy stuff, there seems to be quite a lot to do in SLC. Here's a site with more info: https://www.visitsaltlake.com/
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Old 10-17-2017, 05:48 AM
 
21 posts, read 17,012 times
Reputation: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Restless in Florida View Post
Hi there. I'm not a SLC resident, but I looked very extensively into Utah while considering a place to move, so I'll see if I can help.

I've visited Utah, staying with family in the very southwest corner, to the west of St. George, not far from the Arizona border. They did say that due to the liquor laws in Utah (and sometimes having to drive to find a place that sells alcohol), they prefer to drive into Arizona to stock up on wine / liquor. There is a large Mormon presence throughout the state, and I believe their conservative moral / family values play a large role in the generally strict alcohol policies, as well as a law (in some places at least) that mandates businesses be closed on Sundays. I've heard that the people in this state are some of the nicest there are, and that plenty of non-LDS people feel right at home and never feel pressured about their differences in faith.

What I found most amazing about the state was that we were surrounded by desert terrain but then we'd find ourselves swimming in a lake on a red-sand beach and next day hiking through trees, rivers and bamboo grass! Salt Lake City is a few hours north of where I visited, and up there it does get quite cold, and gets plenty of snow. It's near some great ski destinations. Ogden, which is just a little north of SLC, is rated one of the best places for families in the nation. The entire state is full of beautiful national & state parks and has one of the healthiest populations.

Other than hiking, skiing and other outdoorsy stuff, there seems to be quite a lot to do in SLC. Here's a site with more info: https://www.visitsaltlake.com/
Thanks for the input. It looks like we'll be leaning more towards Orlando to move.
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Old 10-17-2017, 06:09 AM
 
21,185 posts, read 30,343,833 times
Reputation: 19590
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedelight21 View Post
Hi everybody.

I'm currently situated in Long Island, NY. We moved back from NC to NY to be closer to family and friends. Needless to say, rent and food are catching up. At this point, we can't pay all of our bills with the way things are going. There aren't many manufacturing jobs out here for him that pay decently. I'm in the Accounting/finance industry so I can pretty much find a job anywhere. We were looking to possibly move. However, we would search for jobs first before moving. We're interested in the following areas:

1. Orlando/Tampa, Florida: I did some research and rent is affordable. Wages aren't bad for the cost of living and it's growing. The warmer weather doesn't hurt either. Plus, we wouldn't have to pay state income tax. There is plenty to do.

2. Denver/Colorado Springs, Colorado: There are many manufacturing jobs available and at decent wages. Rent is reasonable starting at $730 from the places I looked at. That's lower than what we pay now and what we paid in NC. However, it's in the higher range of rent compared to the other places. The areas are booming.

3. Pittsburgh, PA: There are plenty of manufacturing jobs. I've heard public transportation is decent even though we have a car. Rent prices are affordable. It's the closest to NY if we want to visit family or friends. I don't think I would be a fan of the weather though.

4. Indianapolis, Indiana: My brother in law and nephews live there. Rent is cheap and there are plenty of jobs. I've heard that there isn't much to do though and the weather sucks.

5. Salt Lake City, Utah: Rent is reasonable. There are plenty of jobs, but I don't really know much about things to do. I've heard certain laws are somewhat strict.

We're looking for affordability, an abundance of manufacturing jobs, prefer warm weather, things to do (We're in our late 20's), work life balance, good education since we're thinking of having kids in the future, and pet friendly (2 cats). We also especially like an area with diverse food like NY.
The lynchpin for a place to live out of the options provided would be finding decent paying manufacturing jobs since finance/accounting will be fairly consistent most anywhere in terms of salary. Orlando/Tampa would be worst and as a nearby resident can tell you whatever manufacturing is present here are largely relocated companies from higher-paying states offering below industry salaries in an area where the average rent has reached levels not equivalent to salaries. Orlando for instance is among a handful of cities (including cities like San Francisco and NYC) known as "rent burdened" when factoring average take home pay. I wouldn't see Denver or Salt Lake City faring well for manufacturing either as both have seen economic boom from the "white collar/IT" sector versus manufacturing. Pittsburgh does see some affordable rent options but over recent years it is no longer the "bargain" it once was and in my opinion feel you could do much better in Indianapolis in terms of jobs for both of you and a cost of living that would allow for a good margin of disposable income to enjoy life. Not sure I'm getting the "not much to do aspect" as like any larger city Indianapolis has a sizable selection of things to do ranging from arts/culture and museums, festivals, farmers markets, professional sports, outdoor recreation, varying shopping venues and the list goes on. If warmer weather is truly a sticking point have you considered Atlanta? The city is booming in all aspects and would offer lots of job opportunity for both of you along with a milder climate and a cost of living well within reason.
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Old 10-17-2017, 07:11 AM
 
1,266 posts, read 745,973 times
Reputation: 1590
Why not check out Atlanta? Definitely some decent manufacturing jobs there. The city has been booming for the past few years and has been gaining population steadily. Diverse food options are all along Buford Highway, and cost of living is cheaper out that way too. That area offers a very reasonable commute to Buckhead/Midtown/Downtown where you would likely work. The suburbs of Marietta and Smyrna would offer better schools I'd imagine. Can't beat the weather if you're coming from NY. Lots of direct flights to NY as well from ATL.
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Old 10-17-2017, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,078 posts, read 2,109,467 times
Reputation: 3582
Those are 5 pretty diverse choices that bring a significant amount of differences to the table for consideration. Not only are they different within each city/metro but each geographic regions is very distinct from each other as well. I think you may need to put a few more qualifiers on they table to help dissect you choices as your current list is very short and most of it can be met by most of these, excepting the "warm" part.

Drilling into "manufacturing" is also a key part of this. Are we talking about traditional metal fabrication skills like welding, technology manufacturing like clean rooms, old fashioned repetitive assembly line work, or something else? These days, home construction and brewing beer may all fall in to the manufacturing category on some radar screens, so defining the type of work you are after may help narrow the areas that best provide a match.

According to an Industry Week 2014 report, the top ten hubs of manufacturing can be found in California, Texas, New York, Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, Connecticut, and North Carolina. However, they only looked at gross revenue numbers, sheer number of employed, and number of headquarters in each state. They did not break it down into industries, metros, or near term growth rates.

I tend to be a big Rocky Mtn area in general and Colorado specific supporter. However, our 2% unemployment rate and 1-2% annual growth rate means it is not always cheap nor easy to make it here. While those figures may seem low, considering the metro areas base numbers, that can mean 2000 people a month are moving into the Denver metro area. That is a lot of competition for housing that is not going up as quickly as people are arriving. But we are a dynamic and growing area which has a lot of outdoor as well as indoor activities, a national reputation for healthful lifestyles, with a broad range of weather for those activities, and some darned good educational institutions.
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Old 10-17-2017, 10:32 AM
 
21 posts, read 17,012 times
Reputation: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by TCHP View Post
Those are 5 pretty diverse choices that bring a significant amount of differences to the table for consideration. Not only are they different within each city/metro but each geographic regions is very distinct from each other as well. I think you may need to put a few more qualifiers on they table to help dissect you choices as your current list is very short and most of it can be met by most of these, excepting the "warm" part.

Drilling into "manufacturing" is also a key part of this. Are we talking about traditional metal fabrication skills like welding, technology manufacturing like clean rooms, old fashioned repetitive assembly line work, or something else? These days, home construction and brewing beer may all fall in to the manufacturing category on some radar screens, so defining the type of work you are after may help narrow the areas that best provide a match.

According to an Industry Week 2014 report, the top ten hubs of manufacturing can be found in California, Texas, New York, Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, Connecticut, and North Carolina. However, they only looked at gross revenue numbers, sheer number of employed, and number of headquarters in each state. They did not break it down into industries, metros, or near term growth rates.

I tend to be a big Rocky Mtn area in general and Colorado specific supporter. However, our 2% unemployment rate and 1-2% annual growth rate means it is not always cheap nor easy to make it here. While those figures may seem low, considering the metro areas base numbers, that can mean 2000 people a month are moving into the Denver metro area. That is a lot of competition for housing that is not going up as quickly as people are arriving. But we are a dynamic and growing area which has a lot of outdoor as well as indoor activities, a national reputation for healthful lifestyles, with a broad range of weather for those activities, and some darned good educational institutions.

Well my husband has worked for manufacturing in the hospitality art industry by making frames and cutting glass. He's also done some assembly work involving wire rope isolators for military equipment.
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