U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-06-2017, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,644,306 times
Reputation: 3625

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
The problem with this logic.............. 10 to 20 years from that Suburbia perfect fantasy won't exist.

A lot of sprawl and white flight happen because people had stuck in their heads of this "American Dream" fantasy. that their suburbia wonderland will stay the same for generations. When half of these places will likely change.

What happens is the suburbs demographic change, the population and traffic increase, some times crime increase, Some time strip malls and etc die. They find their perfect suburbia fantasy to nothing they expect 10 to 20 years down the line. It's essentially turn into the city, with out the advantages of one but with all the disadvantages of sprawl.

Poverty is moving to the suburbs

Suburbs and the New American Poverty

Suburban poverty is missing from the conversation about America’s future


And thing about crime and schools. The higher the population the greater the chance the crime rate would be off set and drop........ Schools the same thing... if more of those suburban kids went to inner city schools it would increase the school success rate. Suburban sprawl started only after WW2 but didn't really kick off until after the 60's. A lot people especially in the south left perfectly good urban neighborhoods the fleed because segregation was over. This drain wealth out of some cities in which cause more high poverty area and bad schools to start in the first place.



Another issue what no body talks about the culture of retirement homes increase with raise of suburban sprawl. This cause before baby boomers the elderly lived in communities that it would possible walk to the store, the doctor, walk to family and etc. Now this is lesser the case the elderly is now more isolated and dependent.

I brought this up cause you speak as if it just a cool trend for the young to live in urban areas like it's wiser and more responsible to live suburban area. Which actually it's opposite urban areas are built for people to lives whole live. Suburban sprawl is basically a experiment created by baby boomers who was not thinking about their own future. And how a cu de sac is not sustainable.
While history tends to repeat itself, it's important to still remember that things change and we can't guarantee WHEN exactly history will repeat itself.

Millennials won't have as much wealth as their parents. Millennials earn 20% less than Boomers did when Boomers were at this age. And Millennials have half the net worth as Boomers did in their prime. This is the first generation in American history for that to happen. The "American dream" suburban lifestyle is a pipe dream so long as people view their much needed shelters as investments that should always be increasing in value.

And someone quoted me earlier about "those" people. "Those" people I meant to describe alternative people, anyone who goes against the suburban American cultural norm. Anything that doesn't fall in line with the Andy Griffith show and what that means in the suburbs today. Yes people do want to escape people not like them all the time. We can talk about the Trump Wall and liberals wanting to stay away from rednecks but that would get too political for this particular thread...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-06-2017, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,122 posts, read 1,309,145 times
Reputation: 1831
Quote:
Originally Posted by bus man View Post
To each his own. I would be furious if I came home to find graffiti on my door. I would report it to the police, and I would have it painted over immediately. I don't like grittiness at all. Which is why I live in a non-gritty, upper middle class suburb. The poster whom I've quoted would probably die if he lived where I do. And I'd probably feel the same way if I lived where he does. So it's a good thing that each of us live where we do, and not in the other's place.

All that said, some of the graffiti artists have incredible, mind-blowing talent. And when they channel that talent into beautiful murals, I believe that their community is enhanced. But I can't stand seeing random scrawls and the F-bomb all over the place, and I will avoid any place like that.
lol. I can’t imagine what the NYPD would say if I tried to call them because of one piece of graffiti on my apartment building — in a very gritty area in Brooklyn, on a very busy street where EVERY building is covered in graffiti already! I think I’d probably just be laughed at.

Also there is a difference in talking about a house that you own vs an apartment building, especially in the suburbs. You also probably have a large lawn or garden or something where my building is directly on the street, and is not separated physically from any of the other buildings on the block.

But yeah, we both probably would die if we switched places, lol.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2017, 07:02 PM
 
Location: The Windy City
5,300 posts, read 3,305,544 times
Reputation: 4513
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post
Paris is gritty....very gritty in parts. To me, gritty isn't dirt, it's buildings that have survived the wrecking ball, that have the opportunity to be turned into something cool...condos, shopping venues, etc. It's old factories turned into condos that are much sought after, once they're completed. Dirt and grit aren't the same thing.
I guess we all have different definitions of grit and dirt.

Paris has more dirt than grit to me. Chicago has more grit than dirt.

This is grit. Although the building is abandoned, it's rather clean.



And this is just dirty (think Paris):

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2017, 12:25 AM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,823 posts, read 12,330,814 times
Reputation: 4774
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
Some people may interpret "grit" as character, spontaneity and signs of a city's past. Re-purposed industrial buildings can turn out to be pretty cool.
True though for me the cities with the most "character" in the nation are some of the least "gritty" - Savannah and Charleston SC. Grittiness is a way some people use to market a city that is truly just very ghetto and run down. Detroit is a gritty city for sure, so is Philadelphia, Baltimore, Newark, parts of Chicago, the Bronx etc etc. Pittsburgh is nicer now since its less "gritty" than in the past.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2017, 01:10 AM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,070 posts, read 4,104,883 times
Reputation: 3694
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clayton white guy View Post
I am the type of person that likes nice clean cities full of beautiful greenery. I do believe that everyone is entitled to their opinion, but why would you seek filthy, graffiti sprayed crumbling neighborhoods absent of ANY form of green growing things? This may sound snarky, I don't mean it to be, but please explain to me the appeal of grit!
I agree. Dark and gloomy cities with boarded up, painted up buildings and empty downtowns are not for me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2017, 01:19 AM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,587,525 times
Reputation: 6091
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
True though for me the cities with the most "character" in the nation are some of the least "gritty" - Savannah and Charleston SC. Grittiness is a way some people use to market a city that is truly just very ghetto and run down. Detroit is a gritty city for sure, so is Philadelphia, Baltimore, Newark, parts of Chicago, the Bronx etc etc. Pittsburgh is nicer now since its less "gritty" than in the past.
The Bronx actually isn't that dangerous anymore. If it were its own city, its murder rate would not even be notably high.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2017, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,659,080 times
Reputation: 4508
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
True though for me the cities with the most "character" in the nation are some of the least "gritty" - Savannah and Charleston SC. Grittiness is a way some people use to market a city that is truly just very ghetto and run down. Detroit is a gritty city for sure, so is Philadelphia, Baltimore, Newark, parts of Chicago, the Bronx etc etc. Pittsburgh is nicer now since its less "gritty" than in the past.
Per my own idea of grittiness, it wasn't that hard to find in Savannah: https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0708...7i13312!8i6656
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2017, 08:10 AM
 
Location: alexandria, VA
9,499 posts, read 4,346,308 times
Reputation: 5293
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
Per my own idea of grittiness, it wasn't that hard to find in Savannah: https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0708...7i13312!8i6656
That doesn't look gritty to me at all. Just an alley and cleaner than most I've seen.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2017, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Aurora, Colorado
5,441 posts, read 8,153,163 times
Reputation: 4487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clayton white guy View Post
I am the type of person that likes nice clean cities full of beautiful greenery. I do believe that everyone is entitled to their opinion, but why would you seek filthy, graffiti sprayed crumbling neighborhoods absent of ANY form of green growing things? This may sound snarky, I don't mean it to be, but please explain to me the appeal of grit!
Right? There is nothing appealing about an area that looks like it’s on its last leg imo. I can appreciate a city that looks like it cares to look nice much more.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2017, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
1,501 posts, read 1,353,097 times
Reputation: 1723
Quote:
Originally Posted by manitopiaaa View Post
I hate the hyper-commercialized developer-class eyesores that are being built now, where every new condo project is some derivative of the same design.

Here's a building in Toronto:


https://image.slidesharecdn.com/broc...?cb=1465264443

Oh wow, I've never seen that design before! It's only literally the same design that's being mass produced everywhere else. But we're supposed to be forcefed the idea that the eyesore above + a Starbucks and a Whole Foods equals progress? I'm supposed to feel a sense of happiness walking through block after block of the same building design?

Soon you wind up like Vancouver, where you shell out $4,000 a month to live in an apartment that feels like a 21st century Commieblock.

Here's your squeaky clean Vancouver:

http://yourvancouverrealestate.ca/im...Linksvayer.jpg

I would die living there.

So yes, you can have clean cities full of hipsters. They're also full of cookie-cutter architecture and feel completely fake.

That's where grittiness comes from. Grittiness can't be manufactured. It doesn't come from corporate. It's can't be focus-tested to death.

Grittiness is the natural byproduct of a city being a city. It's the feeling of a place being lived in. I want to live somewhere where I know that things happened.

I was in Baltimore yesterday and loved neighborhood-hopping. From Fell's Point to Mount Vernon to Inner Harbor, I felt like these buildings symbolized things. They symbolized industrialization, the rise of American shipping, the rise of philanthropy, the spread of Methodism, the change of architectural styles from colonial to beaux arts to art deco to modern. The neighborhoods didn't just have chain stores and endless cafes but tattoo parlors and old laundromats with old ladies hauling clothes.

There was also blight, poverty and boarded-up windows. There's a story to tell there as well.

But, in the end, I loved Baltimore because I could sink my teeth into it. It felt real, it felt raw, it felt like a place with a story to tell. It also felt like a city proud of its history, all warts and all. I hate the thinking that cities have to be like Subaru commercials - flashy, modern, forward-thinking. The greatest cities in the world today embrace their history - London, Paris, Rome, New York even.

It's a shame so many people today want to live in assembly line town centers in giant apartment buildings the size of neighborhood blocks that where designed by Bjarke Ingals after a vomit-filled bender.

Look at the flashy "modern" architecture of Saint Louis in the 1960s and 1970s. It's repulsive ugly and decaying.

Now look at Mount Vernon in Baltimore. Two hundred years later and it feels timeless. Georgetown, DC, is 350+ years old and looks timeless.

In 100 years, those old buildings in Baltimore will still look great. And places like Mississauga will look like Chernobyl.

That's why I like grittiness. You can't manufacture authenticity.
Typical stupid anti Canadian pretentious crap from the same parrot! Yawn
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top