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Old 11-07-2017, 10:19 AM
 
2,001 posts, read 1,015,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mezter View Post
Right? There is nothing appealing about an area that looks like itís on its last leg imo. I can appreciate a city that looks like it cares to look nice much more.
Gritty and slums are different. I posted an example of gritty, and there's nothing that's not appealing about it. Gritty is not boarded up....slums are.
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Old 11-07-2017, 10:21 AM
 
5,450 posts, read 2,294,635 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clayton white guy View Post
I am the type of person that likes nice clean cities full of beautiful greenery. I do believe that everyone is entitled to their opinion, but why would you seek filthy, graffiti sprayed crumbling neighborhoods absent of ANY form of green growing things? This may sound snarky, I don't mean it to be, but please explain to me the appeal of grit!
It's an authenticity thing to them.
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Old 11-07-2017, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,112 posts, read 1,305,291 times
Reputation: 1825
Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
The suburbanites are out in attack!
^^^ just gonna leave this here again
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Old 11-07-2017, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Brew City
4,220 posts, read 2,503,558 times
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Put me in the "a little grit, please" camp.


Happily moving to Milwaukee on Friday.
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Old 11-07-2017, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,852 posts, read 7,797,618 times
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Gritty neighborhoods are the incubators of innovation and small business. Entrepreneurs wishing to open a new restaurant, gallery, boutique, etc. are priced out of the more polished parts of town by corporate giants such as Starbucks, Pottery Barn, PF Chang's, Gap, etc. This means that the small start-ups in the grittier neighborhoods are locally owned, keeping money in the community rather exporting it to LA, NYC and other places far away. In addition, they imbue their neighborhoods with a unique "feel" rather than the United Colors of Benetton encroaching everywhere else we look.
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Old 11-07-2017, 01:54 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,820 posts, read 12,324,125 times
Reputation: 4768
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
Gritty neighborhoods are the incubators of innovation and small business. Entrepreneurs wishing to open a new restaurant, gallery, boutique, etc. are priced out of the more polished parts of town by corporate giants such as Starbucks, Pottery Barn, PF Chang's, Gap, etc. This means that the small start-ups in the grittier neighborhoods are locally owned, keeping money in the community rather exporting it to LA, NYC and other places far away. In addition, they imbue their neighborhoods with a unique "feel" rather than the United Colors of Benetton encroaching everywhere else we look.
Charleston and Savannah and the Garden District of New Orleans are examples of places that are extremely "polished" yet NOT overrun with national chains and are still dominated by small locally owned businesses and startups. I believe a lot of Austin, Texas is like that too.
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Old 11-07-2017, 01:57 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,820 posts, read 12,324,125 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by r small View Post
That doesn't look gritty to me at all. Just an alley and cleaner than most I've seen.
Yes in a "gritty" city like Baltimore there will be graffiti covering the walls, the windows will be boarded up and there will be trash littering the pavement.......I also understand New York City was quite gritty in the 70s and 80s (before Rudy Giuliani cleaned things up) and not as much today. I wonder who misses the bad old days there.....
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Old 11-07-2017, 01:59 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,708,360 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clayton white guy View Post
I am the type of person that likes nice clean cities full of beautiful greenery. I do believe that everyone is entitled to their opinion, but why would you seek filthy, graffiti sprayed crumbling neighborhoods absent of ANY form of green growing things? This may sound snarky, I don't mean it to be, but please explain to me the appeal of grit!
It just seems more natural and real to me... there has to be a middle ground though, not all out piles of trash in the street but no perfectly cut grass and trimmed bushes either.
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Old 11-07-2017, 02:06 PM
 
56,569 posts, read 80,870,855 times
Reputation: 12499
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
Yes in a "gritty" city like Baltimore there will be graffiti covering the walls, the windows will be boarded up and there will be trash littering the pavement.......I also understand New York City was quite gritty in the 70s and 80s (before Rudy Giuliani cleaned things up) and not as much today. I wonder who misses the bad old days there.....
Actually, David Dinkins was the mayor when NYC was starting to get cleaned up. https://mobile.nytimes.com/2009/10/2....html?referer=

Criticism for Giuliani's 'Broken Windows' Theory - Business Insider
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Old 11-07-2017, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,852 posts, read 7,797,618 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
Charleston and Savannah and the Garden District of New Orleans are examples of places that are extremely "polished" yet NOT overrun with national chains and are still dominated by small locally owned businesses and startups. I believe a lot of Austin, Texas is like that too.
Well, thereís a Pottery Barn on King Street and 2 Starbucks within a few blocks of one another in Savannahís historic core. The economy driver of the core of both of those cities is tourism. Businesses that rely on touristsí dollars can get by with a more inferior quality than those those that rely on the return business of their neighbors. Also, it is much more affordable to open and run a business in a gritty neighborhood than to run that same business in the center of a cityís tourist section.
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