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Old 11-14-2017, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,492 posts, read 1,594,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kmanshouse View Post
Another part is a feeling of "old" and "classic" that is waning each and every year all over the US. Gentrification can be done anywhere. It is not difficult to have a Starbucks, Panda Express, Banana Republic and an Athleta store be added to your street and survive. Corporate stores are anywhere and everywhere. What is difficult? Having a bodega, local deli, boutique shoe store, and a sausage shop, thrive for 50-60 years. So when they do, there is a feeling of wonderment and respect. Where people still have accents but make no mistake know your language and can talk politics, sports, and food with anyone.
What about a foreign fast food chain that's pioneering into the US? For example, Nando's from South Africa. Would you say it takes away from grittiness/character, or does it contribute to it somehow?
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Old 11-14-2017, 06:09 PM
 
Location: San Jose
2,107 posts, read 640,252 times
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When I think of grittiness I think of something like this:



I can sorta understand why some people might find it appealing in a dystopian sorta way but I would imagine it would get old and depressing very quickly. Good setting for a story, sure. Place to live and work each day...no
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Old 11-14-2017, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,110 posts, read 1,303,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KenFresno View Post
When I think of grittiness I think of something like this:



I can sorta understand why some people might find it appealing in a dystopian sorta way but I would imagine it would get old and depressing very quickly. Good setting for a story, sure. Place to live and work each day...no
That is a very old, outdated photo of DUMBO. Must be at least 20-30 years ago! That area has changed a LOT since then.
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Old 11-14-2017, 06:38 PM
 
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Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
That is a very old, outdated photo of DUMBO. Must be at least 20-30 years ago! That area has changed a LOT since then.
The LES on the other hand is still gritty but very vibrant, not dystopian at all. I wanna take some pictures of my own and post them here to show people what we mean.
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Old 11-14-2017, 06:47 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,568,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
Agreed, and I wonder how many of those people hating a few pages back would actually be able to afford it too.



YES! I love fire escapes. Iíve always wanted to have one, but I never have. Those things are basically balconies for people that canít afford balconies (which are usually crazy money in NYC). So many fun times were had on my friends old fire escape in LES that one Summer. Great place to have a smoke sesh, a few beers, and just hang out and watch all the people go by on the street.

Someday I hope I can have one....
Probably none of them!

I remember a poster, I think from Florida came to NYC to visit and commented "I can't believe those old run down looking buildings are expensive"!

As for fire escapes, my grandma's building in Brooklyn has them but she's on the first floor and the Super would definitely not let anyone hang out on them. So I guess it's easier to hang out on those if you live in a smaller building with no live in super.
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Old 11-14-2017, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,893 posts, read 7,652,237 times
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Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
Have you ever watched that movie? I grew up with true grit. My mother used to wash the window sills and porches. Coal town.
Off topic: I've heard that, in the old days in Youngstown, they called the soot from the steel mills that collected on everything "pay dirt."
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Old 11-14-2017, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KenFresno View Post
When I think of grittiness I think of something like this:

I can sorta understand why some people might find it appealing in a dystopian sorta way but I would imagine it would get old and depressing very quickly. Good setting for a story, sure. Place to live and work each day...no
That's not gritty; that's brooding.

"Gritty" means there's a sense of down-to-earth liveliness to the area: weird but non-criminal pedestrians, street murals, quirky businesses, street vendors hawking food, weathered Bueax Arts buildings, fire escapes everywhere, rock band stickers affixed onto street signs, etc. This photo doesn't have it at all. If you've read "By the Waters of Babylon" by S. V. Benet---an apocalyptic short story set in New York---it has the same feel to it as this photo.

This photo is way out of date indeed. Just look at the cars!
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Old 11-15-2017, 11:07 AM
 
1,951 posts, read 1,941,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KenFresno View Post
When I think of grittiness I think of something like this:

I can sorta understand why some people might find it appealing in a dystopian sorta way but I would imagine it would get old and depressing very quickly. Good setting for a story, sure. Place to live and work each day...no
That is most definitively gritty to me and highly appealing indeed. That picture is just beautiful regardless of when it was taken. I don't believe there is a generally accepted definition of what grit is, but to me the industrial era buildings and streets like you would find in Detroit, St. Louis, Chicago, Baltimore, Philly, or NYC are gritty. Grit typically involves more or less run down industrial era buildings that lack maintenance, and have broken streets and pavements, all of which have seen better days once. Both industrial buildings and inner city neighborhoods with apartment buildings and row houses can appear gritty to me but I don't find suburban areas, even those with abandoned, boarded up industrial era homes like in Detroit or South Chicago gritty. I consider those to be just run down.

There is a thin line between what is gritty and beautiful and what is just run down and dilapidated on the other hand. Generally, American rust belt and east coast cities are very appealing to me but their suburbs with abandoned, boarded up homes not so much.

You're right probably that grit is beautiful mostly to outsiders. If you grew up in a gritty city you probably don't consider it gritty anyway but just normal.
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Old 11-15-2017, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,110 posts, read 1,303,876 times
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For anyone interested: here is that same shot today:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/564627...-96Xymn-nsPJgc

Definitely not dystopian or depressing at all anymore. It is now actually I believe the #1 most expensive neighborhood in all of Brooklyn, and one of the most vibrant in all of NYC. This is not a recent change either, it has been cleaned up for as long as I can remember. I’m guessing that old picture dates back to the mid 80s at the very latest. I do like that they rehabilated a lot of old warehouse buildings in that area, but DUMBO doesn’t exactly come to my mind when I think of gritty neighborhoods. The neighborhood is extremely posh and polished but still does retain a little bit of grittiness in some parts.
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Old 11-15-2017, 04:04 PM
 
2,164 posts, read 1,458,168 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drro View Post
That is most definitively gritty to me and highly appealing indeed. That picture is just beautiful regardless of when it was taken. I don't believe there is a generally accepted definition of what grit is, but to me the industrial era buildings and streets like you would find in Detroit, St. Louis, Chicago, Baltimore, Philly, or NYC are gritty. Grit typically involves more or less run down industrial era buildings that lack maintenance, and have broken streets and pavements, all of which have seen better days once. Both industrial buildings and inner city neighborhoods with apartment buildings and row houses can appear gritty to me but I don't find suburban areas, even those with abandoned, boarded up industrial era homes like in Detroit or South Chicago gritty. I consider those to be just run down.

There is a thin line between what is gritty and beautiful and what is just run down and dilapidated on the other hand. Generally, American rust belt and east coast cities are very appealing to me but their suburbs with abandoned, boarded up homes not so much.

You're right probably that grit is beautiful mostly to outsiders. If you grew up in a gritty city you probably don't consider it gritty anyway but just normal.
That's what I consider it too. places like these in Pittsburgh I think exemplify it well


https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4508...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4501...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4419...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4493...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.4433...7i13312!8i6656

I consider most of the photos that many other posters have put up recently to be simply older places with a little character - that's a separate category from grit. The old Brooklyn pic, yeah that's grit.

Last edited by _Buster; 11-15-2017 at 04:25 PM..
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