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Old 10-27-2017, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Yakima WA
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When I moved to central Washington State 5 years ago I was surprised that some people have a Southern accent. How is that possible in a state so far North I wondered?
I did some research and discovered this region had a large influx of people from Arkansas in the 1960s. Sure enough, sometimes I'll ask people with a Southern accent where they are from and they always say Arkansas. Interestingly some younger people who were born and raised here with grandparents who migrated from Arkansas still end up with a Southern accent.

Most people here (without Arkansas roots) have a slight accent with subtle Canadian and California influences...from what I understand the California influences have become much stronger in the younger generation.
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Old 10-28-2017, 08:02 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soletaire View Post
Texas: southern white (white upper south accent in north/ northeast texas, white lowers south accent in central/southeast texas), southern black (black upper south accent in north/northeast texas, black lower south accent in central/southeast texas), hispanic (multiple hispanic accents) cajun (in SE Texas), midwestern (in panhandle), german (in central texas), along with foreign immigrant accents.
They dont have midwestern accents in the panhandle, they have that Texas twang. When you think of a texan accent that is what I picture, that twangy sound.
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Old 10-28-2017, 01:04 PM
 
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My vote is for Ohio.

Other states are just less diverse when it comes to the variety of accents. When you are in Southern OH, you'd swear you were further south than what you actually are. When you are closer to Toledo, accents are much more Midwestern.

Ohio is a melting pot in a lot of ways.
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Old 10-28-2017, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Yakima WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snoopygirlmi View Post
My vote is for Ohio.

Other states are just less diverse when it comes to the variety of accents. When you are in Southern OH, you'd swear you were further south than what you actually are. When you are closer to Toledo, accents are much more Midwestern.

Ohio is a melting pot in a lot of ways.
Most of the Midwestern states that border the South are the same way.
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Old 10-29-2017, 03:47 PM
 
Location: DFW
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Texas. The majority of people actually speak with a neutral accent although a significant minority have a distinguishable Southern accent, and from what I hear, there's even variety in the types of Southern accents.

California actually has quite a few accents (mostly Pacific Northwest or Southern) outside of the big cities. In college, I knew someone from Bakersfield who had a distinct Southern accent and even all of my dorm mates thought he was from the South.

Basically, the bigger states (in terms of both population and physical size) are likely to have more variety in accents.
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Old 10-29-2017, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Katy,Texas
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Texas
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Old 10-29-2017, 04:30 PM
 
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New York. NYC Metro accents vs rest of state difference is huge. Multiple different local NYC Metro accents, though may need to be a local to readily recognize differences. Differences between North County and Western/Central NY. Also, local differences in WNY, and even Buffalo neighborhood differences can be recognized among old timers.
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Old 10-30-2017, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soletaire View Post
Texas: southern white (white upper south accent in north/ northeast texas, white lowers south accent in central/southeast texas), southern black (black upper south accent in north/northeast texas, black lower south accent in central/southeast texas), hispanic (multiple hispanic accents) cajun (in SE Texas), midwestern (in panhandle), german (in central texas), along with foreign immigrant accents.
The Texas panhandle does not sound Midwestern. It may be geographically close to the Midwest but its still Texas. They sound similar to the rest of West Texas which is a Texas twang. (Oklahoma is similar) Also anyone in Texas who speaks in a GERMAN accent is from Germany not Texas. Just cuz their ancestry may be German (or Czech) does not mean "zey schpeak like zis."
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Old 10-30-2017, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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I noticed how different parts of Texas have different flavours to the accent, even though it all sounds distinctively Texan. Those from North Texas sound similar to folks from Tennessee or Kentucky. (Much of Oklahoma is the same) It's a more open sound. Not sure how to describe it I just know it when I hear it. Those from East Texas sound like Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. West Texas has that rugged western sound to it. It still sounds southern but more "gruff." Central Texas is like a subtle blend. South Texas is is a little more Tex-Mex. The cities sound a bit more neutral, with stronger accents in older folks and blue collar folks. Suburbs sound a little twangier but still neutral. Its in the small country towns where the accents are thickest. Now there's some variety in Texas but I think there's other states with a wider range. Oklahoma's got the most similar accent.
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Old 10-30-2017, 10:43 PM
 
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I would say by far Florida. You can have natives (born and raised) sounding like they're from the deep South, from NYC, or from the midwest, and everything inbetween. In Miami, a lot of the natives have an accent that sounds almost as if they're not native English speakers.

The reason is simple, Florida is a state of transplants and recent transplants who formed their enclaves and reinforce their own way of speaking.

No other state or even region comes close.
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