U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-01-2017, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
8,726 posts, read 7,679,658 times
Reputation: 7636

Advertisements

If you're abroad, you will definitely think of yourself as an American first and foremost. But domestically, I think people will identify with city or state.

I have lived in Boston for 5 years and Columbus 4 years before that. I still think of myself as a Clevelander though. However, when I lived in Russia, it was always exciting to meet any American, whether from Virginia, California, or Louisiana. Definitely thought of myself as American at that time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-02-2017, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,384,906 times
Reputation: 7710
Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
City. The city is the actual, specific place that a person lives in.

State and Country borders mostly exist for political reasons. For example in my State I don’t identify at all with Niagara Falls or Buffalo since they are 300 miles away. I’d be quicker to identify with Jersey City, NJ since it is right next door to me despite the fact that it’s across State lines.

And then The USA as a whole is just way too big. There are places in the USA thousands of miles away from me that really couldn’t be much more different than NYC, where I live, so I don’t really identify with them at all.
That's easier if you've only lived in ONE city, though. But a lot of people have lived in several towns or cities even if its the same state. Take my ex for example; he has lived all over Texas. Grew up between West Texas and Dallas, currently lives in the northern part of DFW. He strongly identifies as being from Texas. The town he lives in he's only been in for 2 years. He went to grade school in at least 3 different towns and cities. But they were all in Texas. Aside from the fact that Texans are largely super proud of Texas, the fact he's lived all over the state (as I have as well) means he just claims the state. Plus, if he was to claim his main hometown, only those from the areas outside that town AND the town itself would even know where it is!

But I can totally see why someone from NYC would strongly identify with NYC and not with NY state as a whole. New York is an animal on its own and like Chicago, its very distinct from its host state and honestly more like New Jersey than much of Upstate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2017, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,384,906 times
Reputation: 7710
I live in Minnesota and ergo the Midwest/North. I gladly call this place home and gladly pick up cultural traits and parts of the lifestyle, but I also identify which where I have lived and grown up in the past. I didn't grow up in Texas but I also consider that my home. Made great connections there although I'd rather live up here, I do miss friends and the food, quite a lot!

I grew up in Florida, specifically South Florida. While I do bash and hate on Miami a lot (the city gets on my nerves) I still do claim it as my hometown with no hesitation, and the nostalgia will always be there. (Unless they tear buildings and places down, but the memories stay.) I would say I'd identify with Florida as a whole more than simply Miami. Even though the only two counties I have lived in were Broward and Dade County, I have family all over the state ranging from the Miami area, to the Naples area, to Orlando, to the Lafayette and Suwanee County area and over to Jacksonville, and I have memories from all those places, good or bad.

So I guess it depends on context. I identify as an American, a Floridian, a Southerner, a former Texas resident, a current Minnesota resident. Give it time, I might identify as a "Midwesterner" too, who knows!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2017, 06:51 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,247 posts, read 19,545,740 times
Reputation: 13002
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
If you're abroad, you will definitely think of yourself as an American first and foremost.
This is true. I feel like this whenever I'm overseas, or even in Canada.

Most people in foreign countries think of Americans as pretty much all the same no matter where you're from.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2017, 08:41 AM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,375,148 times
Reputation: 10924
I identify most with the city of Chicago, far more than the state of Illinois or even Metro Chicago area. For me most of my world exists within a 20 square mile area of the city itself.

Growing up I identified with Iowa City, as it was somewhat of an anomaly for Iowa being such a liberal college town.

I've identified as an Iowan and certainly am very proud to be a Midwesterner and a Chicagoan. Illinois and suburban Chicago though - no.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2017, 04:32 PM
 
1,830 posts, read 1,252,205 times
Reputation: 1822
Even abroad I identify more strongly as Texan. I get excited or raise my eyebrow whenever I meet another Texan outside of the country but I don't care much about meeting another American outside of the country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-04-2017, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Chicago
5,877 posts, read 6,535,124 times
Reputation: 5344
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
I identify most with the city of Chicago, far more than the state of Illinois or even Metro Chicago area. For me most of my world exists within a 20 square mile area of the city itself.

Growing up I identified with Iowa City, as it was somewhat of an anomaly for Iowa being such a liberal college town.

I've identified as an Iowan and certainly am very proud to be a Midwesterner and a Chicagoan. Illinois and suburban Chicago though - no.
I think I've mentioned this one to you before, Chicago60614: Iowa City sometimes feels like a far western suburb of Chicago. The University of Iowa is overloaded with suburban Chicago kids and IC, in general, has a real tilt to Chicago. When the Cubs were making their world championship run in 2016, every bar in Iowa City was sporting Cub pennants. Also, the Tribune has always been available from news stands in downtown IC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2017, 05:06 PM
 
517 posts, read 343,098 times
Reputation: 971
Have you heard of the Pacific Southwest? We have been here for over a century.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2017, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,542 posts, read 708,496 times
Reputation: 1983
I grew up in Albany Park on the north side of Chicago and moved to Oak Park for grade school. I identify with those two areas strongly, and even with my specific neighborhood of Oak Park (which, admittedly, is probably helped by the fact that I'm active in a Facebook group pertaining to events, development, businesses, and other stuff in that neighborhood of the village).

Weirdly, though, I don't find myself identifying that much with the Chicago area these days, I think because being from a large city is "cool" these days and so many people in large cities are transplants, so it feels kind of meaningless. I do strongly identify as an Illinoisan, though, even though most downstaters would think they have beans in common with me. It's weird; I can be driving across the Indiana-Illinois state line, with cornfields as far as the eye can see on both sides, and I'll suddenly feel more "at home" for some reason as soon as I cross the border, even though it's just an arbitrary political boundary.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2017, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia
1,609 posts, read 1,107,747 times
Reputation: 1903
1. American
2. Virginian
3. Washingtonian

But I have attachment to all three.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top