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Old 11-07-2017, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
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Interactive Map: Shows where population growth has been taking place this decade from census tracts to states:

https://www.arcgis.com/home/webmap/v...57f13c7295893e

You can zoom in all the way to individual census tracts within the city and it will show the rate of population growth and initial populations for this decade OR you can zoom all the way out and it will show you population growth at the state level. In addition to everything in between.

Should come in handy to those that want to assess population growth and infill rates within their cities. Shades of blue mean growth, shades of red mean decline.
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Old 11-07-2017, 10:19 PM
 
6,817 posts, read 6,963,776 times
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Pretty sure this is projected population growth numbers and not actual growth numbers. Under the 'About' section, it says the data uses the 2012 Updated Demographics.

https://www.arcgis.com/home/item.htm...57f13c7295893e

For example, I checked Atlanta census tracts and specfically looked at Midtown Atlanta's tracts and it's showing some tracts with negative growth despite the fact that over a dozen new residential highrises have been completed and leased up completely over the last few years.
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Old 11-07-2017, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
6,567 posts, read 7,688,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Pretty sure this is projected population growth numbers and not actual growth numbers. Under the 'About' section, it says the data uses the 2012 Updated Demographics.

https://www.arcgis.com/home/item.htm...57f13c7295893e

For example, I checked Atlanta census tracts and specfically looked at Midtown Atlanta's tracts and it's showing some tracts with negative growth despite the fact that over a dozen new residential highrises have been completed and leased up completely over the last few years.
I haven't looked into this specific situation...

Just keep in mind there are other demographic trends at play other than the development of buildings.

As some new neighborhoods age empty nesters stay in place, but the area has fewer kids and the population declines despite staying the same, maintaining jobs, and even some new development.

Other problems is sometimes an area will shift from families to singles. In some areas apartments go packed full of kids and some will have just 1 or 2 people.

There are all sorts of oddities.

This is a key reason that many successful large cities in the core and in their more established suburbs will be dotted with red and great dots across the area.

It often isn't those areas are going downhill. In fact, they might even have some significant infill development on the few tight parcels zoned for change. But there are demographics shifts at who is in the homes at play.


In the case of Midtown Atlanta, it looks like it is the areas between Ponce and 10th street you're talking about. I couldn't tell you what is going on there, but keep in mind some things have changed with new development. Some apartment complexes were torn down for some developments, not all new developments were residential, some shelters in that area have been shut down (Pine st wasn't the only one), and half that area is actually hold houses to the east. Keep in mind this is a part of the city where people are allowed to sub-divide houses and turn into multi-unit buildings. The problem is sometimes there are trends where richer people are buying them up for SFH and sometimes people buy them and rent part for investment income. There are ebbs and flows that rise and falls.

But yes... this map is old. These are just projections...

I'm just trying to stir the pot to get people thinking about why so many cities seems to be a tapestry of random speckles in often successful areas.
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