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Old 11-11-2017, 05:19 PM
 
Location: City of North Las Vegas, NV
11,290 posts, read 7,874,230 times
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On the other hand Colorado and Wyoming are almost squares and close behind are New Mexico and Utah.
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Old 11-11-2017, 05:58 PM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
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I find the Oklahoma/Texas area interesting. I feel like the Texas panhandle should have been Oklahoma. What’s the history behind the narrow Oklahoma panhandle?
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Old 11-11-2017, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefox View Post
I find the Oklahoma/Texas area interesting. I feel like the Texas panhandle should have been Oklahoma. What’s the history behind the narrow Oklahoma panhandle?
Well the Oklahoma panhandle used to be Texas. When Texas entered the union they wanted to keep slaves, but the Missouri Compromise banned slavery above the latitude of wherever that small strip is, so Texas had to forfeit that area to be a slave state in the union. It became an unclaimed strip. Then the strip became it's own territory in 1886 (not formally recognized by Congress though). The strip was almost attached to Kansas but didn't get approved by President Cleveland. The panhandle became part of Oklahoma in 1890.
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Old 11-11-2017, 11:39 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Originally Posted by jFug View Post
Instead of calling it the Texas Panhandle they should call it the Texas Chimney.
Looks like the top part of a cowboy hat. Texas is a tornado with a cowboy hat.
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Old 11-12-2017, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Erie, PA
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I agree West Virginia is also weirdly shaped. The whole state looks like it was drawn by a toddler and then it has a random right angle in its NE corner.
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Old 11-12-2017, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
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Agree with several already mentioned: MD for sure; it was split up the center so looks very odd.

I love it for its natural beauty but WV is one strangely shaped state.

Oklahoma looks like a pan.

Louisiana looks like a boot.

Michigan is not so much weirdly shaped but looks like a mitten and is strange that it has the UP and not Wisconsin, lol.

Massachusetts is also pretty weirdly shaped IMO.
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Old 11-12-2017, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Other than Maryland, West Virginia and Michigan.
Those are my three picks too.

Most other states have weird corners, but overall those three have the weirdest bodies.
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Old 11-12-2017, 11:41 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMI View Post
Maybe not weird but I like Nevada’s angle from the Colorado River down at 35N up to Lake Tahoe.

Also Oklahoma is like a pot with handle...it’s panhandle,
a panhandle so skinny,it’s like why bother, give it to Texas
Due to the Compromise that said anything above a certain latitude would be a free state, Texas could not claim it since it was admitted as a slave state. It was a small stop of land between Texas and Kansas Territory. It became known as No Mans Land, and was used mostly as hunting territory for nomadic Indian tribes, mostly Comanche.

A story of the Oklahoma Panhandle - Indian Country News

Last edited by katygirl68; 11-12-2017 at 11:50 PM..
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Old 11-13-2017, 02:37 AM
 
Location: SW Virginia
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New Jersey shaped a little similar to the letter "S".
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Old 11-13-2017, 03:40 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,507 posts, read 7,452,949 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canudigit View Post
You probably know why that is, but Michigan was given the acreage in what was to become the Upper Peninsula by the federal government to compensate for having to give Toledo and control of the Maumee River and its access to Lake Erie to Ohio in the Toledo War back in the 1830s.

The Toledo War: When Michigan and Ohio Nearly Came to Blows - History in the Headlines

"At the stroke of a pen, Toledo and the Maumee officially became part of the state of Ohio. Michigan, meanwhile, was compensated with 9,000 square miles of land on the Upper Peninsula between Lake Michigan and Lake Superior. At the time, many Michiganders considered the trade-off a bad deal. The Detroit Free Press even dubbed the Upper Peninsula a barren wasteland of “perpetual snows,” but public opinion later shifted after the region was found to contain valuable deposits of copper and iron ore."

Had things gone the other way, Michigan would simply be a big mitten with a little more wrist and the UP would surely belong to Wisconsin.
Actually the way I understand it Michigan already had the eastern third of the UP. Had it gone the other way Michigan May have gotten the Toledo strip and it would have had 1/3 of the UP. The western two thirds of the Up would have been part of Wisconsin. The real looser of the Toledo strip conflict was Wisconsin, it should be a bigger state. Michigan definitely has one of the strangest shapes of any state because of the strange circumstances of its admission to the union in 1837.

Others shaped oddly IMO are West Virginia ( also formed under strange circumstances), Florida, Idaho and Oklahoma. I know history channel did a program a few years ago about the shapes of our states and how they came to be.
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