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Old 11-13-2017, 06:35 AM
 
Location: Chi > DC > Reno > SEA
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Rhode Island has kind of an odd shape. People think it's just a rectangle or whatever, but the bay that juts in actually takes up a lot of what the rectangle's area would be.
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Old 11-13-2017, 09:49 AM
 
Location: USA
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Of all of these states mentioned, I have yet to find anyone mentioning New York. The entire Upstate area is normal and makes sense because of the way the Great Lakes are set up, but once you get towards NYC, that's when it gets weird. Its so vast until you're south of Poughkeepsie then there's this 10 mile gap between the edge of NJ and CT. States Island should be part of NJ and Long Island has these weird Island chains that look like they should be part of RI or CT.
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Old 11-13-2017, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Erie, PA
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What I find strange about the US in general is that our states have a lot of straight lines and right angles. In fact, every state has a straight line in it's border except Hawaii. A lot of states also have right angles in their borders.


Other than Canada, a lot of other countries' political subdivisions (UK counties, Mexican states, Brazilian states, Chinese provinces, etc.) are just jagged, squiggly lines, with very little rhyme or reason.


And also, I find it interesting that as you go farther west in the US, the state shapes become more geometrical.





Last edited by jFug; 11-13-2017 at 10:19 AM.. Reason: Added more text
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Old 11-13-2017, 11:53 AM
 
7,447 posts, read 4,635,186 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jFug View Post
And also, I find it interesting that as you go farther west in the US, the state shapes become more geometrical.
I'm sure there are several reasons for that, but one of them has to be that there are fewer rivers to form natural state boundaries.
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Old 11-13-2017, 01:54 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Comparing to the shapes of states around the world, I would say the weird ones are the square and mostly square ones like Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexico, etc.

Irregular boundaries based on natural features are the norm.
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Old 11-13-2017, 03:18 PM
 
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Maryland by a mile
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Old 11-13-2017, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Comparing to the shapes of states around the world, I would say the weird ones are the square and mostly square ones like Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexico, etc.

Irregular boundaries based on natural features are the norm.
Western states are also ""new"" areas and thus haven't been adapted because of history or changes of culture.

For an example, Northern California and Southern California are so different, many people have considered splitting the state up. California got a high population fast and has sustained it for so long that they were able to develop a more isolated region with a unique culture of California while in the inland West like ourselves were skipped over during these economic booms and haven't quite settled in to certain ways yet. For an example, many say the whole West is similar culturally, but I think over the course of time, the West is beginning to divide up. Arizona and Washington are becoming less and less similar, as an example.

In some other Western states, like Washington, Colorado, Arizona, and even some non-Western states like Illinois and New York, there is a HUGE population imbalance where one area of the state dominates politically like a primate city. This creates a major concern for the constantly losing area, and may make the losing area retaliate or threaten to secede from that state and create its own. This is particularly true if the losing area has issues that are constantly not being addressed because of the focus on the more populated area.

Las Vegas used to be a part of Arizona until the federal government decided to use the Colorado river as a boundary instead of continuing the line. Imagine what Las Vegas would be like if it was in Arizona and not Nevada. Imagine what Nevada would be like without Las Vegas and some rights to the Hoover Dam which is a huge water and electric supplier. What if Colorado was split at the Front Range? What if Washington split in half?

I think the Western states as they become more developed will split up in the future to have more natural feature borders.
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Old 11-13-2017, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Howard County, Maryland
6,143 posts, read 3,947,854 times
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Maryland, for sure.




Quote:
Originally Posted by manitopiaaa View Post
Or just unite Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia and DC into a 'Capitol Region' state of 16,940,527 people in 73,296 square miles of land. It would still barely crack the Top 20 states by area.

Do the same for New England. 62,688 square miles and 14,735,525 people.

Give Delaware and Southern Jersey to Pennsylvania. Give the rest to New York.

Merge states together so that no state has less than <10 million people and aim for 25 states.

A lot of the funky shapes in Maryland/WV are historical in nature and there's no reason they should still remain valid. West Virginia wanted Harpers Ferry because it wanted a piece of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal and didn't want Virginia to have a piece of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.

None of those have been valid for 100+ years. So why should WV still have these weird appendages?
Here's how I would do it. Unite Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, and West Virginia (plus D.C.) into a state called Delmarva. Join Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, and Rhode Island into the state of New England. (It's postal code would be NE, so Nebraska will have to become NB. Though, isn't that New Brunswick? So I guess it'll have to become NR or NA.) Merge Pennsylvania and New Jersey into Penn Jersey. Combine North and South Carolina into the state of Carolina. And join Tennessee and Kentucky into Kennessee. (Or Tennetucky. Or Ten Ken.) Presto, we have a nice, even 40 states.
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Old 11-14-2017, 05:52 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,321 posts, read 18,436,091 times
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Missouri looks funny because it has a foot. Nebraska also looks funny, but I can't really explain why.

Not many people realize that the southern borders of California and Georgia are not parallel with their northern borders, nor do they realize that the border between Kentucky and Tennessee is not very straight.

South Carolina looks like a bird with a fat beak, and the fact that it's very loosely diamond-shaped has a way of turning the compass 45 degrees. Most major roads in South Carolina go southwest/northeast or northwest/southeast instead of north/south or east/west.
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Old 11-14-2017, 06:08 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
7,126 posts, read 5,064,247 times
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Take an empty beer can, pull the tab upward, give the can a squeeze, hold the can upside down and you will have the shape of Missouri.
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