U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-16-2017, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
15,385 posts, read 19,149,678 times
Reputation: 3597

Advertisements

We have a water canal from the early 1800ís, that became a railroad later in the 1800ís, that is now a trail.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farmington_Canal
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-16-2017, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,583 posts, read 4,006,044 times
Reputation: 2926
There are several in SC, to include the Swamp Rabbit Trail that runs through downtown Greenville.

https://greenvillerec.com/ghs-swamp-rabbit-trail/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2017, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,093 posts, read 54,581,442 times
Reputation: 66491
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevie View Post
Thanks for the links. Interesting that they've been doing it for so long too.

Also "rails to trails" lol quite catchy.
Lots of Rails to Trails hiking places in New Jersey. Old rights-of-way from now-defunct rail lines.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2017, 09:43 AM
 
4,924 posts, read 1,837,241 times
Reputation: 4660
It is very common everywhere. Most of these conversions are railroad lines that are no longer being used. They have the contiguous land and bridges in place and are usually very flat making them great for bike paths. I regularly bike such paths each week here in New England which once had many old rail lines. The closest trail to me actually runs parallel to a still active freight line and a 190 year old former canal. Much of the paved trail follows the canal's original toe path.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-20-2017, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,510,898 times
Reputation: 15950
Railroads have always been more suitable than highways for the movement of heavy freight in large quantities; but due to the lower factor of adhesion between steel wheel and rail, they can't economically surmount a rise of about three feet or more per 100 feet of horizontal distance on a sustained basis. This has had strong economic consequences since their development nearly two centuries ago.

From the start of the Industrial Revolution, and until the emergence of the self-propelled vehicle, trucks for freight in particular, all heavy freight had to move by rail unless tide- or slack-(canal) water was available. Under those conditions, it was more economically-justifiable for rail lines to extend further into rural areas, to dominate the movement of all freight over shorter distances, and to develop special rail-based adaptations for industries like logging and mining. These conditions no longer prevail, so many former rail rights-of-way have been abandoned nearly half of the nation's peak total rail mileage (in 1915), in fact. However, the gentle grades make them perfect for cycling, and a lot of them are in locations well-suited to public access -- just a fortunate coincidence.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-21-2017, 01:37 PM
 
4,924 posts, read 1,837,241 times
Reputation: 4660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stylo View Post
We have a water canal from the early 1800ís, that became a railroad later in the 1800ís, that is now a trail.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farmington_Canal

Have done this trail from Westfield, MA to Simsbury, CT. Can see remnants of dug out canal but it had no water.

The Blackstone River Bikeway Trail in RI runs along the Blackstone River, portions of the Blackstone Canal (went from Worcester to Providence), and the main Providence and Worcester RR line. The canal opened in 1830 and many segments of it still have water running through it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-21-2017, 02:33 PM
 
1,273 posts, read 750,680 times
Reputation: 1596
Upstate NY has done this quite a bit. They turn into some really nice trails.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-21-2017, 02:54 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,470 posts, read 25,420,814 times
Reputation: 8936
I believe so. I grew up right next to a trail that used to be a railroad called the "Iron Horse Trail", a clear reference to what it was.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-23-2017, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,321 posts, read 2,746,799 times
Reputation: 1464
Instead of ruining perfectly good rail tracks they should start marketing these!

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-24-2017, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,510,898 times
Reputation: 15950
Cool picture! -- the device in question is called a trackman's velocipede (same principle as a 2-(wo)man handcar), and they were more common in the years before World War I, and the coming of the automobile and the all-weather highway, They allowed trackworkers, and their supervisors, to access remote locations more easily, and they turn up occasionally in old films and TV episodes with a railroad theme. But in most cases, a modern bicycle or ATV would offer greater flexibility -- and far less risk if a stretch of track the rider thought was abandoned turns out not to be.

It's not often remembered today that around the same time, a bike-oriented path was actually built and operated commercially with private capital. Unfortunately, and despite the very suitable market of the day, emerging technology didn't permit it to prosper for very long.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_Cycleway

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 11-24-2017 at 01:40 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top