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Old 11-17-2017, 11:19 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,515 posts, read 1,602,908 times
Reputation: 4405

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTimidBlueBars View Post
My impression is that three factors tend to make areas more superficial and judgmental:

- High population density
- High median income
- Strongly partisan politics (either small-town conservative or cosmopolitan liberal)
I don't know if this is true all the time. When me and my friends road-tripped to New Orleans, I found it to be one of the most welcoming places I've ever traveled to. Not in a "hold your hand as you get to know the place" way, but rather "come as you are" way. And it was pretty dense even it on the outskirts, at least by American standards. Parts of the French Quarter are very wealthy too, only I didn't "feel" the wealth.

Los Angeles, on the other hand, is a sprawling giant suburb (read: not dense), and I felt judged the minute I left LAX. There was just an intimidating vibe in the air . I felt really out of place, dressed in gym shoes, casual jeans, and an Old Navy T-shirt. (Maybe I should have worn Armani .) Fortunately, it was just a 45-minute transit to Port of Long Beach, without setting foot in LA itself.

Perhaps it's not a bad idea to define what "welcoming" actually means. Is it a place that holds your hand as you get to know it, a place where it's OK to come as you are, a place where you feel comfortable for no apparent reason, some combination of these, or something else entirely?

Last edited by MillennialUrbanist; 11-17-2017 at 11:43 PM..
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Old 11-17-2017, 11:26 PM
sub
Status: "Feeling suspicious" (set 2 days ago)
 
791 posts, read 411,063 times
Reputation: 1357
I'll second the rust belt.
Small town south can be absurdly status obsessed.
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Old 11-17-2017, 11:50 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,824 posts, read 12,333,377 times
Reputation: 4774
West Virginia definitely fits the bill there. The most down to Earth people ever! While people are friendly and easygoing they are also very open about things and what is and isn't tolerated/acceptable there. People are also most definitely NOT caught up on political correctness AT ALL. Most people I knew were very upfront and honest about things in general. A couple athletes tried to the do the Colin Kaepernick thing at a college and were booed and insulted openly by large numbers of fans and told to leave America if they didn't like it here.

Walmart brands ,not fancy designer labels, are the norm and people in elite clothing actually stand out. People are definitely much more into pickup trucks and Jeeps than Mercedes, BMWs, other luxury vehicles etc. There isn't a single Trader Joe's or Whole Foods in the entire state and even Starbucks is rare and is seen as a rather yuppie place.


A snowflake will not survive there. Also like that to a lesser extent here in Louisiana though there is more political correctness at least when we are aroudn the black population. (for example being careful where we wear our rebel shirts and hats......)
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Old 11-17-2017, 11:54 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,824 posts, read 12,333,377 times
Reputation: 4774
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
I don't know if this is true all the time. When me and my friends road-tripped to New Orleans, I found it to be one of the most welcoming places I've ever traveled to. Not in a "hold your hand as you get to know the place" way, but rather "come as you are" way. And it was pretty dense even it on the outskirts, at least by American standards. Parts of the French Quarter are very wealthy too, only I didn't "feel" the wealth.

Los Angeles, on the other hand, is a sprawling giant suburb (read: not dense), and I felt judged the minute I left LAX. There was just an intimidating vibe in the air . I felt really out of place, dressed in gym shoes, casual jeans, and an Old Navy T-shirt. (Maybe I should have worn Armani .) Fortunately, it was just a 45-minute transit to Port of Long Beach, without setting foot in LA itself.

Perhaps it's not a bad idea to define what "welcoming" actually means. Is it a place that holds your hand as you get to know it, a place where it's OK to come as you are, a place where you feel comfortable for no apparent reason, some combination of these, or something else entirely?
I do agree that New Orleans is the live and let live kind of liberalism, vs the Portland/Seattle/San Francisco/NYC kind of liberalism where all other viewpoints/lifestyles need to be silenced. NOLA really is the kind of place where someone in a rainbow flag shirt and someone in a Confederate flag shirt can share a couple drinks at the same local bar.
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Old 11-18-2017, 07:17 AM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,551 posts, read 712,907 times
Reputation: 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
I don't know if this is true all the time. When me and my friends road-tripped to New Orleans, I found it to be one of the most welcoming places I've ever traveled to. Not in a "hold your hand as you get to know the place" way, but rather "come as you are" way. And it was pretty dense even it on the outskirts, at least by American standards. Parts of the French Quarter are very wealthy too, only I didn't "feel" the wealth.

Los Angeles, on the other hand, is a sprawling giant suburb (read: not dense), and I felt judged the minute I left LAX. There was just an intimidating vibe in the air . I felt really out of place, dressed in gym shoes, casual jeans, and an Old Navy T-shirt. (Maybe I should have worn Armani .) Fortunately, it was just a 45-minute transit to Port of Long Beach, without setting foot in LA itself.

Perhaps it's not a bad idea to define what "welcoming" actually means. Is it a place that holds your hand as you get to know it, a place where it's OK to come as you are, a place where you feel comfortable for no apparent reason, some combination of these, or something else entirely?
It's worth noting that New Orleans is much less dense than it feels, and LA is much more so. Wikipedia puts their population densities at 2,311 and 8,483 people per square mile, respectively.

Of course, these are only general rules - Malibu indeed has a lower density than either, and is well known as being the epitome of superficial. It also does, as you say, depend on which definition we're talking about.
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Old 11-18-2017, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,515 posts, read 1,602,908 times
Reputation: 4405
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
West Virginia definitely fits the bill there. The most down to Earth people ever! While people are friendly and easygoing they are also very open about things and what is and isn't tolerated/acceptable there. People are also most definitely NOT caught up on political correctness AT ALL. Most people I knew were very upfront and honest about things in general. A couple athletes tried to the do the Colin Kaepernick thing at a college and were booed and insulted openly by large numbers of fans and told to leave America if they didn't like it here.
Hmm... What about---to let the elephant out of the room---religion? Would an atheist like myself be fine in West Virginia? I'm aware that rural areas---South especially, but I'm sure Appalachia too---are almost universally Christian (this includes Catholicism). Obviously, I wouldn't push my atheist agenda on people. But if it came up in conversation, and I somehow admitted not going to church , how would people react?

On a side note, when I was in New Orleans, religion never came up. I talked to locals about history, fun things to do, and hunting alligators.
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Old 11-18-2017, 02:04 PM
 
Location: West Tennessee
2,082 posts, read 2,900,302 times
Reputation: 1337
Quote:
Originally Posted by sub View Post
I'll second the rust belt.
Small town south can be absurdly status obsessed.
I've noticed this in the "lowland" small town south, but not so much in the "upland" small town south.
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Old 11-18-2017, 02:10 PM
 
Location: San Diego CA>Tijuana, BC>San Antonio, TX
4,181 posts, read 4,160,762 times
Reputation: 3474
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
West Virginia definitely fits the bill there. People are also most definitely NOT caught up on political correctness AT ALL. Most people I knew were very upfront and honest about things in general. A couple athletes tried to the do the Colin Kaepernick thing at a college and were booed and insulted openly by large numbers of fans and told to leave America if they didn't like it here.
I agree with your WalMart and lack of Trader Joes/Starbucks, but how is the above an example of Not Being Superficial?
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Old 11-18-2017, 02:13 PM
 
Location: SF, CA
1,518 posts, read 682,322 times
Reputation: 2371
Quote:
Originally Posted by ragnarkar View Post
What part of the US is least prone to the mentality of keeping up with the Jones and are least likely to judge others based on the clothes they wear, the cars they drive, the phones rhey own, etc. I think all 50 states are at least somewhat prone to this but not all equally. I personally think this is less prevalent in the Pacific Northwest and the Midwest. What do you think?
Interesting question...

Perhaps rural New England? (just guessing-- as I've never lived in that area, and barely even visited)
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Old 11-18-2017, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,515 posts, read 1,602,908 times
Reputation: 4405
Quote:
Originally Posted by NW4me View Post
Perhaps rural New England? (just guessing-- as I've never lived in that area, and barely even visited)
I'll buy that. It's a liberal area indeed, just not "California" liberal. Which somehow gives it a non-superficial vibe. Of course, it's a speculation, since I've never visited it, either. Unless you count New York.

Last edited by MillennialUrbanist; 11-18-2017 at 02:57 PM..
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