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Old 11-28-2017, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
506 posts, read 340,195 times
Reputation: 1206

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
I don't know if this is true all the time. When me and my friends road-tripped to New Orleans, I found it to be one of the most welcoming places I've ever traveled to. Not in a "hold your hand as you get to know the place" way, but rather "come as you are" way. And it was pretty dense even it on the outskirts, at least by American standards. Parts of the French Quarter are very wealthy too, only I didn't "feel" the wealth.

Los Angeles, on the other hand, is a sprawling giant suburb (read: not dense), and I felt judged the minute I left LAX. There was just an intimidating vibe in the air . I felt really out of place, dressed in gym shoes, casual jeans, and an Old Navy T-shirt. (Maybe I should have worn Armani .) Fortunately, it was just a 45-minute transit to Port of Long Beach, without setting foot in LA itself.

Perhaps it's not a bad idea to define what "welcoming" actually means. Is it a place that holds your hand as you get to know it, a place where it's OK to come as you are, a place where you feel comfortable for no apparent reason, some combination of these, or something else entirely?
"sprawling, giant suburb."

Okay
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Old 11-28-2017, 10:03 PM
 
Location: SF, CA
1,524 posts, read 690,603 times
Reputation: 2397
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post

Los Angeles, on the other hand, is a sprawling giant suburb (read: not dense), and I felt judged the minute I left LAX. There was just an intimidating vibe in the air . I felt really out of place, dressed in gym shoes, casual jeans, and an Old Navy T-shirt. (Maybe I should have worn Armani .) Fortunately, it was just a 45-minute transit to Port of Long Beach, without setting foot in LA itself.
Long Beach, too, I've found to be a casual, unpretentious, friendly part of So Cal, although I haven't spent a lot of time there. One interesting thing too: I remember hanging out with a group of people who lived there; one of them asked another about his plans for the next day (a Sunday). The reply: "hmm, I might go up to LA." So, some people in Long Beach don't think of their city as being part of LA, but a distinct place in itself.
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Old 11-28-2017, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,529 posts, read 1,616,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NW4me View Post
Long Beach, too, I've found to be a casual, unpretentious, friendly part of So Cal, although I haven't spent a lot of time there. One interesting thing too: I remember hanging out with a group of people who lived there; one of them asked another about his plans for the next day (a Sunday). The reply: "hmm, I might go up to LA." So, some people in Long Beach don't think of their city as being part of LA, but a distinct place in itself.
I read the same thing about Venice, LA, CA. Early on in its history, in 1905, it was founded as a copy of Venice, Italy. It was meant to be a quirky, bohemian place. It had things that would make every hipster's knees buckle in delight: 20 miles of canals, electric trains running to nearby cities, a local narrow-gauge railroad, a Coney Island-style amusement park, a ballroom, and Italianate architecture.

Unfortunately, by 1925, Venice, CA ran into financial problems. The only way it could save itself was to get annexed by Los Angeles. LA didn't like the bohemian vibe of Venice, and immediately began to remake it in its own image. Most of the canals were filled in, the railroad tracks were dismantled or paved over, and amusement parks were closed and torn down. Quickly, Venice turned into the SoCal wasteland City-Data loves to hate. By the 1950's, the Venice neighborhood, neglected by LA, put today's East St. Louis and Detroit to shame.

I'm beginning to understand why I felt so unwelcome and ill-at-ease in LA during the short time I passed through it.

Last edited by MillennialUrbanist; 11-28-2017 at 10:57 PM..
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Old 11-29-2017, 06:15 AM
 
6,040 posts, read 4,448,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
I read the same thing about Venice, LA, CA. Early on in its history, in 1905, it was founded as a copy of Venice, Italy. It was meant to be a quirky, bohemian place. It had things that would make every hipster's knees buckle in delight: 20 miles of canals, electric trains running to nearby cities, a local narrow-gauge railroad, a Coney Island-style amusement park, a ballroom, and Italianate architecture.

Unfortunately, by 1925, Venice, CA ran into financial problems. The only way it could save itself was to get annexed by Los Angeles. LA didn't like the bohemian vibe of Venice, and immediately began to remake it in its own image. Most of the canals were filled in, the railroad tracks were dismantled or paved over, and amusement parks were closed and torn down. Quickly, Venice turned into the SoCal wasteland City-Data loves to hate. By the 1950's, the Venice neighborhood, neglected by LA, put today's East St. Louis and Detroit to shame.

I'm beginning to understand why I felt so unwelcome and ill-at-ease in LA during the short time I passed through it.
Honestly, you could not be more wrong. Venice is nothing like that. It's overrun with hipsters, techies, high-tech companies, and $$$$$$$ houses. Well, and homeless but that's everywhere in LA.

Please stop spreading terribly wrong information. What's in it for you?
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Old 11-29-2017, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,529 posts, read 1,616,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elhelmete View Post
Honestly, you could not be more wrong. Venice is nothing like that. It's overrun with hipsters, techies, high-tech companies, and $$$$$$$ houses. Well, and homeless but that's everywhere in LA.
I'm aware that Venice is "nothing like that" today. Even so, the fashion-heavy LA culture is still strong there. But in 1950's, Venice was indeed a gangster battleground, and stayed that way through 1980's. It didn't turn around (read: start to gentrify) until 90's or 2000's, after which, it became like you're describing. And at least admit one thing: the Muscle Beach is easily the poster boy of superficiality.

It'd be nice if Venice never joined LA; it would have kept more of its quirky character and its canals, that Abbot Kinney originally envisioned. But financial problems and the Automobile Age did Venice's in.

Source: https://www.westland.net/venice/history.htm and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venice,_Los_Angeles.

Last edited by MillennialUrbanist; 11-29-2017 at 07:41 AM..
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Old 11-29-2017, 07:43 AM
 
6,040 posts, read 4,448,454 times
Reputation: 16753
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
I'm aware that Venice is "nothing like that" today. Even so, the fashion-heavy LA culture is still strong there. But in 1950's, Venice was indeed a gangster battleground, and stayed that way through 1980's. It didn't turn around (read: start to gentrify) until 90's or 2000's, after which, it became like you're describing. And at least admit one thing: the Muscle Beach is easily the poster boy of superficiality.

It'd be nice if Venice never joined LA; it would have kept more of its quirky character and its canals, that Abbot Kinney originally envisioned. But financial problems and the Automobile Age did Venice's in.

Source: https://www.westland.net/venice/history.htm and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venice,_Los_Angeles.
Screw wikipedia. Have you been there? Everything you post about it is cliched and/or flat out wrong.
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Old 11-29-2017, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
506 posts, read 340,195 times
Reputation: 1206
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
I'm aware that Venice is "nothing like that" today. Even so, the fashion-heavy LA culture is still strong there. But in 1950's, Venice was indeed a gangster battleground, and stayed that way through 1980's. It didn't turn around (read: start to gentrify) until 90's or 2000's, after which, it became like you're describing. And at least admit one thing: the Muscle Beach is easily the poster boy of superficiality.

It'd be nice if Venice never joined LA; it would have kept more of its quirky character and its canals, that Abbot Kinney originally envisioned. But financial problems and the Automobile Age did Venice's in.

Source: https://www.westland.net/venice/history.htm and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venice,_Los_Angeles.
You sure know a lot about Venice despite only having only seen LA from the 405 from LAX to Long Beach
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Old 11-29-2017, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,529 posts, read 1,616,532 times
Reputation: 4423
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajams22 View Post
You sure know a lot about Venice despite only having only seen LA from the 405 from LAX to Long Beach
No need to , lol. I did a lot of reading on Venice, because I got intrigued by the name. I also have a friend who went there and liked it. Although, his opinion of LA in general is much better than my own.

Last edited by MillennialUrbanist; 11-29-2017 at 09:13 AM.. Reason: punctuation.
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Old 11-29-2017, 09:25 AM
 
6,040 posts, read 4,448,454 times
Reputation: 16753
Well then, it's settled after this level of intense research and scrutiny.
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Old 11-29-2017, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
2,090 posts, read 1,114,584 times
Reputation: 1856
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Boston is he most superfical? I've heard people complain that they get shamed for indulging in expensive things in Boston. People tend to be very modest in Boston.
We just moved from Chicago, and the delta is absolutely astonishing.

Chicago is extremely loud with money, cars, fashion. For every one BMW in Boston, you see four RAV4s, even in the Metrowest. In the Northshore of Chicago, it is noticeable wealth everywhere. In fact, even the homes in the two areas differ, with Chicago suburban homes often feeling gaudy (like a lot of New Jersey IMO).

Consumption levels may be a bit higher in Chicago- That is, COL lower vs. income levels close, but nothing that warrants the amount of materialism mentioned above.

Important note: I love Chicago.
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