U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-19-2017, 02:32 PM
 
16 posts, read 8,534 times
Reputation: 15

Advertisements

I am a 23 year old from northeastern Ohio. I am looking to move out of state within the next year- year and a half. I have job experience in restaraunts in just about every position except bartending with some experience in managing at a fast-casual restaraunt and I currently work at a dairy. I'm looking to move to a bigger city or near one. I'm wanting to stay on the east side of the U.S. I have had a lot of friends tell me to check out Nashville and Texas. I have only looked into Nashville a little bit a long with Philadelphia. I would like to find somewhere that is somewhat affordable but also has a lot of job opportunities as well. If any one has any suggestions for cities that a lot of people around my age tend to move to. Also with your suggestions please let me know what kind of job market is in that area. I want to find where I'm going and get some experience in whatever fields are best for that area before I move there. Any suggestions will be helpful
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-19-2017, 03:02 PM
 
Location: USA
2,753 posts, read 2,219,556 times
Reputation: 2135
Check out:

Austin, TX
Dallas, TX
Texas has no income tax and many job opportunities near large employment centers

Salt Lake City, UT
Kansas City, MO
Des Moines, IA
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2017, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
545 posts, read 313,896 times
Reputation: 833
I left Ohio as soon as I graduated College, going to Dallas for a full time job in engineering making pretty good money at a big name company. Left after 1.5 years, came back up to Ohio, been here - and happy - for almost 30 years now. Brought my TX wife up here too. I encourage you to leave Ohio nonetheless. You're young, go out there and make it. Find what you want and go for it. I strongly recommend the coasts, that is where the action is. If you're an out-doors type, TX may not fit your bill.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2017, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Mars City
5,091 posts, read 2,143,556 times
Reputation: 7505
For the benefit of those of us who know nothing about Ohio, can you folks shed some light into why people are leaving. Maybe break it down into a simple list of the disappointing aspects. It'd be nice to learn about other states.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2017, 04:07 PM
Bo Bo won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Tenth Edition (Apr-May 2014). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Ohio
16,822 posts, read 33,216,324 times
Reputation: 13610
Any large Texas city has a bunch of restaurants. The recommendation above for Austin as "affordable" is not a good one. Housing is expensive there. San Antonio is currently the most affordable of all of the major cities here, but that could change in the wake of the hurricane damage in the Houston metro area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2017, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,868,792 times
Reputation: 5856
Quote:
Originally Posted by HumpDay View Post
Check out:

Austin, TX
Dallas, TX
Texas has no income tax and many job opportunities near large employment centers

Salt Lake City, UT
Kansas City, MO
Des Moines, IA
I don't know why people make such a big deal about state income tax. We have state income tax here in AZ and it only amounts to about 3% of my gross pay. Hardly noticeable. It's federal income tax that is a much bigger liability
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2017, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Mars City
5,091 posts, read 2,143,556 times
Reputation: 7505
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
I don't know why people make such a big deal about state income tax. We have state income tax here in AZ and it only amounts to about 3% of my gross pay. Hardly noticeable. It's federal income tax that is a much bigger liability
It's worse in other states. It adds up over time. It's scary to me to see that money lost each year, and growing over time, knowing what i could have done with it personally when I lived in a state with no income tax. Yes, it's a big deal if you pay attention to it.

Last edited by Thoreau424; 11-19-2017 at 06:28 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2017, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
6,560 posts, read 10,270,983 times
Reputation: 9802
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thoreau424 View Post
It's worse in other states. CO is over 6%. It adds up over time. It's scary to me to see that money lost each year, and growing over time, knowing what i could have done with it personally when I lived in a state with no income tax. Yes, it's a big deal if you pay attention to it.
Colorado's state income tax rate is a flat 4.63%. Even with a state income tax, the average tax burden here is still slightly lower than Texas because of how idiotically high the property taxes are there.

Last edited by bluescreen73; 11-19-2017 at 06:33 PM.. Reason: State tax rate is 4.63% not 4.65% as I initially stated.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2017, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Mars City
5,091 posts, read 2,143,556 times
Reputation: 7505
Assuming 4.63%, and an annual income of $40k, that's a loss of $1852 in one year, $18,520 in ten years, and $37,040 in 20 years.

Assuming 4.63% and an annual income of $60k, that's a loss of $2778 in one year, $27,780 in ten years, and $55,560 in 20 years.

People are suckers for giving up that money. They must be assuming that government will spend it wiser than themselves (LOL). Go ahead and give those politicians a big hug, and hand 'em your credit card too while you're at it. God bless 'em (wink).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2017, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,868,792 times
Reputation: 5856
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thoreau424 View Post
Assuming 4.63%, and an annual income of $40k, that's a loss of $1852 in one year, $18,520 in ten years, and $37,040 in 20 years.

Assuming 4.63% and an annual income of $60k, that's a loss of $2778 in one year, $27,780 in ten years, and $55,560 in 20 years.

People are suckers for giving up that money. They must be assuming that government will spend it wiser than themselves (LOL). Go ahead and give those politicians a big hug, and hand 'em your credit card too while you're at it. God bless 'em (wink).
You realize that states with no income tax do get that tax money, just in the form of higher property taxes. Texas has very high property taxes
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top