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Old 11-29-2017, 10:38 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
are these fields still active? And if they are extinct do we include extinct volcanoes in our list?
It's a mixed history but these places are mostly quiet now but there is still some heat and magma bodies near the surface. There are hot springs scattered around in places from Truth or Consequences north toward Colorado and fumeroles in Valles Caldera. The last notable eruption at the Caldera was 40,000 years ago. The line of cinder cones visible on the west mesa at Albuquerque are older and were the result of a five mile long fissure eruption that blanketed the area with lava. The Malpais lava fields are reportedly as recent as 800 years. Carrizozo lava field is slightly older about 1,000 years old. The 11,300 foot Mount Taylor, on Albuquerque's western horizon, last erupted 1.5 million years ago.
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Old 11-29-2017, 10:48 AM
 
2,729 posts, read 5,158,028 times
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Craters of The Moon in Idaho is one of the youngest lava flows on the continent and supposedly flows every 2000 years...the last flow was just over 2000 years ago.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crater...t_and_Preserve

Quote:
The Monument and Preserve encompass three major lava fields and about 400 square miles (1,000*km2) of sagebrush steppe grasslands to cover a total area of 1,117 square miles (2,893*km2). All three lava fields lie along the Great Rift of Idaho, with some of the best examples of open rift cracks in the world, including the deepest known on Earth at 800 feet (240*m). There are excellent examples of almost every variety of basaltic lava, as well as tree molds (cavities left by lava-incinerated trees), lava tubes (a type of cave), and many other volcanic features.[5]

The Snake River Plain in Idaho is known as one of the greatest extinct (or nearly extinct) lava flows on earth.

Digital Geology of Idaho - Snake River Plain - Yellowstone Volcanic Province

The "hotspot" that created Yellowstone used to be SW of where Boise is located.


https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...1359775%29.jpg
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Old 11-29-2017, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,956 posts, read 2,227,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Syringaloid View Post
Craters of The Moon in Idaho is one of the youngest lava flows on the continent and supposedly flows every 2000 years...the last flow was just over 2000 years ago.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crater...t_and_Preserve




The Snake River Plain in Idaho is known as one of the greatest extinct (or nearly extinct) lava flows on earth.

Digital Geology of Idaho - Snake River Plain - Yellowstone Volcanic Province

The "hotspot" that created Yellowstone used to be SW of where Boise is located.


https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...1359775%29.jpg
I heard about the Idaho one, I think the appollo mission trained there or something because it looks like the moon?Mt. Adams also has a large lava flow.
https://www.google.com/maps/@46.2695.../data=!3m1!1e3



Also would extinct volcanoes such as Goat Rocks count on this list? It's heavily eroded and just looks like mountains
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gi...4d-121.4069939
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Old 11-29-2017, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
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Mt. Baker (10,781') is 30 miles due east of my house in Bellingham (est. 87,574).

Bellingham with Mt. Baker in the background (Twin Sisters range on the side is non-volcanic).
http://bellinghamweb.net/wp-content/...gham-Baker.gif
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Old 11-29-2017, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Sacramento CA
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Redding, CA
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Old 11-29-2017, 03:49 PM
 
17,727 posts, read 4,096,546 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iconographer View Post
While not in the US, there are several Caribbean cities that exist in the shadow of a volcano ie:

Charlestown, St. Kitts and Nevis
Roseau, Dominica
Basse-Terre, Guadeloupe
St Pierre, Martinique
Castries, St Lucia

Most infamous of all of these is Plymouth, Montserrat that was destroyed by an eruption in the Soufriere Hills in 1995. The Soufriere Hills are still quite active and the southern half of Monserrrat is restricted for most visitors.
Seeing the plume rising above Monserrat from the nearby island of Nevis is a magnificent sight.

https://a0.muscache.com/im/pictures/...olicy=xx_large
Id say the most infamous historically would be St Pierre since 25,000 to 40,000 people died there as a result of a eruption by Mount Pelee when it sent a pyroclastic flow into the city in the span of 2-3 minutes.Austin,Texas was built on top of volcanoes or at least there is one volcano by the airport.
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Old 11-29-2017, 03:51 PM
 
17,727 posts, read 4,096,546 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
are these fields still active? And if they are extinct do we include extinct volcanoes in our list?
we can never be sure if a volcano is extinct for sure.
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Old 11-29-2017, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
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There are many variables in play with this topic. One obviously is the average time between eruptions, not an exact science, but important. Another is the way the ash would blow. As most US weather patterns move west to east this is also important. (When Mt. St. Helens blew in '80, most of the ash moved east towards Yakima, Ritzville and Spokane).

The frequency is an interesting phenomenon. Because there wasn't a huge population in the Western US until the early 20th century, records are uneven and not entirely provable. For example, we know Mt. Rainier, perhaps the greatest US volcanic risk to a major city, (Tacoma, not necessarily Seattle), had some volcanic activity in the 1800's, but none that equaled Mt. St. Helens. The general scientific thought is Rainier was most active about 500,000 years ago, and perhaps a more minor event around 1,000 years ago. The jury is out, but in my mind the odds are slim that Rainier will have a major eruption in any of our lifetimes. The other good news is these things are usually observed building up well ahead of time, unlike earthquakes.
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Old 11-29-2017, 08:35 PM
 
17,727 posts, read 4,096,546 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
There are many variables in play with this topic. One obviously is the average time between eruptions, not an exact science, but important. Another is the way the ash would blow. As most US weather patterns move west to east this is also important. (When Mt. St. Helens blew in '80, most of the ash moved east towards Yakima, Ritzville and Spokane).

The frequency is an interesting phenomenon. Because there wasn't a huge population in the Western US until the early 20th century, records are uneven and not entirely provable. For example, we know Mt. Rainier, perhaps the greatest US volcanic risk to a major city, (Tacoma, not necessarily Seattle), had some volcanic activity in the 1800's, but none that equaled Mt. St. Helens. The general scientific thought is Rainier was most active about 500,000 years ago, and perhaps a more minor event around 1,000 years ago. The jury is out, but in my mind the odds are slim that Rainier will have a major eruption in any of our lifetimes. The other good news is these things are usually observed building up well ahead of time, unlike earthquakes.
I have studied volcanoes all my life and a small minor eruption at Rainier could kill thousands because of lahars just like Nevado del Ruiz did in the Armero tragedy of the 80's.
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Old 11-29-2017, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,575 posts, read 3,716,373 times
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I agree the lahars are the major problem. I appreciate your studies, but I stand by my odds of this happening in our lifetimes are small. And while "thousands" could die, that also is not likely due to advanced warning systems that likely didn't exist in your Columbian example.
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