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Old 12-05-2017, 12:21 PM
 
1,593 posts, read 834,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Space_League View Post
Is it fair to say that Worcester is the least walkable city in New England ?
Probably. Worcester is now trying. It's my home town so I'm going to try to give a glowing report. Worcester is 36 sq miles, huge by New England Standards. Providence, Hartford and New Haven are actually bigger cities in real life.

Worcester is currently doing "downtown" better than in the last 30 years. Worcester is trying to connect downtown to Shrewsbury Street (restaurant row, the old Italian neighborhood, now 20's -30's people) There are new apartments and condo's targeted for 20's - 30's called the Grid District right on the Common. There is also the Canal District which is close to downtown and is mostly populated by Holy Cross or other college kids. Worcester is trying, maybe it will fail but it seems like a better plain than the old 80's Galleria plan.

Last edited by The_General; 12-05-2017 at 12:50 PM..
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Old 12-05-2017, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,390,242 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
I agree wholeheartedly. It is so much quicker and easier and a heck of a lot more convenient to be outside in 90 degree plus temperatures in nothing more than a t shirt, shorts and flip flops than having to dress in layers of clothing, including gloves, ski mask and snow boots in order to walk around outside in zero degree weather.

I find it so much easier to beat the heat and humidity in the summer than to fight the cold, wind, ice and snow in the winter.

Agree to disagree. I'm the opposite. I just got back from walking to downtown Saint Paul from my house (about 2 miles give or take) in the upper teens. Weather is partly cloudy, sunshine, some flurries on and off. I was bundled up of course but super nice and warm. Only part of my body that got cold was my chin, and that was more minor discomfort than anything. Head was warm, body was warm, legs, feet were nice and dry. You have to be willing to dress like an eskimo sometimes, sure, but it ain't as bad as people make it out to me. Mind you I grew up waaay down south where it never snows or freezes.

Now for me, walking in the heat, pure misery. I've had to commute by foot or bike in 90-100 degree weather in Florida and Texas and its just horrendous. I would never walk downtown here if it was in the upper 90s just for fun. Upper teens? No problem. You get hot, and sweaty and guess what, you don't always have the leisure of being able to wear breezy shorts and shirt. Sometimes you have to be wearing work uniform. Nah. I'd rather walk out in freezing weather for an hour, which I do for fun sometimes, than in sweltering humid heat for 30 minutes. I get to my destination soaked in sweat. No fun.
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Old 12-05-2017, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Lower East Side, NYC
2,136 posts, read 1,393,567 times
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lol @ the earlier comments about NYC being less compact than Charleston. My entire life's needs can be satisfied within a block (that takes roughly 1 minute to walk its length) including groceries, haircuts, laundry, dentist, doctor, bar, etc. and even sometimes in multiple ways. This country man.
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Old 12-05-2017, 02:30 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,258 posts, read 19,555,335 times
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Actually, New York City, Philadelphia and Washington DC aren’t that cold except for about 4 months out of the year. They are pleasant in the Spring and Fall and often hot and humid in the summer.

Even the winters aren’t quite as cold as they used to be. However, there still is the occasional blizzard.
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Old 12-05-2017, 03:14 PM
 
613 posts, read 507,934 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Actually, New York City, Philadelphia and Washington DC arenít that cold except for about 4 months out of the year. They are pleasant in the Spring and Fall and often hot and humid in the summer.

Even the winters arenít quite as cold as they used to be. However, there still is the occasional blizzard.
Truth. When I was a kid we used to consistently get snow by Halloween. Now we're lucky to get some by Christmas
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Old 12-05-2017, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
2,086 posts, read 1,106,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Javawood View Post
lol @ the earlier comments about NYC being less compact than Charleston. My entire life's needs can be satisfied within a block (that takes roughly 1 minute to walk its length) including groceries, haircuts, laundry, dentist, doctor, bar, etc. and even sometimes in multiple ways. This country man.
NYC, Boston, Chicago. History, density, public transportation all play(ed) a huge role in city walkability.

Starting in Boston's Back Bay, you have more within a 1 mile radius than all of downtown Houston proper. The bars, restaraunts, shops, grocery stores, the river waterfront.. You'd be lucky to find a grocer alone within a 1 mile radius in many parts of Houston. Owning a car is, if anything, considered a luxury in a city like Boston (purchasing a parking spot can go up to $450k).

Public transportation plays a huge role in the development of walkable communities. "If I can build something close to transit, it necessitates the need for a car." So, more is built, prices go up, and it evolves into more transportation, which evolves into more building, etc. The result is a city completely packed with conveniences, all built around public transportation.
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Old 12-05-2017, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
3,745 posts, read 3,853,765 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
I remember in the movie Panic Room that Jodie Foster bought a whole brownstone on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, but then again, her character had just divorced the CEO of a big pharmaceutical company
Whole brownstones in NYC, especially on the Upper West Side, would go for $10+ million starting price. Maybe in the hood, in upper Manhattan, you might get one for like $5mil. Normally, a brownstone would be split between multiple units, each going for $1mil+.

In the movies that "accurately" portray NYC, "struggling bartenders" live in $20 million condos...
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Old 12-05-2017, 03:15 PM
 
613 posts, read 507,934 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mwj119 View Post
NYC, Boston, Chicago. History, density, public transportation all play(ed) a huge role in city walkability.

Starting in Boston's Back Bay, you have more within a 1 mile radius than all of downtown Houston proper. The bars, restaraunts, shops, grocery stores, the river waterfront.. You'd be lucky to find a grocer alone within a 1 mile radius in many parts of Houston. Owning a car is, if anything, considered a luxury in a city like Boston (purchasing a parking spot can go up to $450k).

Public transportation plays a huge role in the development of walkable communities. "If I can build something close to transit, it necessitates the need for a car." So, more is built, prices go up, and it evolves into more transportation, which evolves into more building, etc. The result is a city completely packed with conveniences, all built around public transportation.
..............aaaaaaaaaaaaand that's why I'm leaving

FYI we had spots selling in Back Bay for half a million since at least 2015
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Old 12-05-2017, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,877,659 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gantz View Post
Whole brownstones in NYC, especially on the Upper West Side, would go for $10+ million starting price. Maybe in the hood, in upper Manhattan, you might get one for like $5mil. Normally, a brownstone would be split between multiple units, each going for $1mil+.

In the movies that "accurately" portray NYC, "struggling bartenders" live in $20 million condos...
Her scenario, being a multi millionaire via divorce of a billionaire seems to be true to life though
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Old 12-05-2017, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,583 posts, read 4,008,695 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Javawood View Post
lol @ the earlier comments about NYC being less compact than Charleston. My entire life's needs can be satisfied within a block (that takes roughly 1 minute to walk its length) including groceries, haircuts, laundry, dentist, doctor, bar, etc. and even sometimes in multiple ways. This country man.
You can have this kind of arrangement in Charleston and other southern cities. I'm not sure why you think this is only doable in NYC.

But unless a person works in retail, it is generally more difficult to live in walking distance of work. Good chance getting kids to school is going to be out of walking distance as well.
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