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Old 12-07-2017, 06:12 AM
 
2,512 posts, read 2,265,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
I don't think there is any difference. I don't think your average person in DC who doesn't live near Adams Morgan is going to go to restaurant/bars in Adams Morgan.

Anyway, moving on. I don't know why I am even talking about this. Reminds me of that time I got into an argument with a person over Moscow ID vs Pullman WA. I think I am losing my marbles.

I guess I just wanted to give some rep for 'the south' on here.


I knew it... you're purposely being obtuse in order to try to give the South some credit on walkability. Which is odd because nobody said the South didn't have walkable areas but rather Northern cities tend to be more walkable. I called it a few pages back.
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Old 12-07-2017, 06:45 AM
 
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There is also the aspect of city limits in comparison. For instance, Greenville is viewed as a city with small city limits in relation to population for the South. It is about 26 square miles. In comparison, Syracuse has about 2 and a half times more people in essentially the same land area and it is a city that is at 2/3rds or so of its peak population. I’m just saying to help illustrate what are likely built environment differences between cities in different regions and why there is a different view of walkability between them.
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Old 12-07-2017, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,849 posts, read 7,795,643 times
Reputation: 9469
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
There is also the aspect of city limits in comparison. For instance, Greenville is viewed as a city with small city limits in relation to population for the South. It is about 26 square miles. In comparison, Syracuse has about 2 and a half times more people in essentially the same land area and it is a city that is at 2/3rds or so of its peak population. I’m just saying to help illustrate what are likely built environment differences between cities in different regions and why there is a different view of walkability between them.
I think what you’re saying is that while some of these southern “cities” (say, Greenvile), may be walkable, there is just not a lot to walk to.
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Old 12-07-2017, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,414 posts, read 11,913,851 times
Reputation: 10533
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
[/b]
I knew it... you're purposely being obtuse in order to try to give the South some credit on walkability. Which is odd because nobody said the South didn't have walkable areas but rather Northern cities tend to be more walkable. I called it a few pages back.
Yeah. Honestly, he derailed the thread from his first post. The question was why the most walkable cities were in cold climates. His response was basically "no you are wrong" and then proceeded to redefine walkability to mean something which made his hometown look reasonably well (e.g., a place you can drive to, park, and walk around in nice weather, with amenities that cater to his interests in particular).

There is nothing wrong with being a homer. I think everyone should have pride in where they live, or move somewhere else. But unless you have actually been to places, you should not act like you are an expert. That's the reason I avoid City Vs. City discussions which compare Pittsburgh to cities I've never even visited.
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Old 12-07-2017, 09:42 AM
 
56,517 posts, read 80,824,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
I think what you’re saying is that while some of these southern “cities” (say, Greenvile), may be walkable, there is just not a lot to walk to.
Or in comparison to similarly sized cities in the areas the OP was referring to based upon built environment. For instance, cties like say Utica or Schenectady in NY, in terms of the city proper, has as many people as Greenville does in smaller land areas. This is considering that both of those NY cities are below their peak population and suffered some degree of urban renewal without any recent annexation. Yet if you look at the built environments of those NY cities, I think most would agree that their built environment and walkability is more urban, in comparison.
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Old 12-07-2017, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,849 posts, read 7,795,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Or in comparison to similarly sized cities in the areas the OP was referring to based upon built environment. For instance, cties like say Utica or Schenectady in NY, in terms of the city proper, has as many people as Greenville does in smaller land areas. This is considering that both of those NY cities are below their peak population and suffered some degree of urban renewal without any recent annexation. Yet if you look at the built environments of those NY cities, I think most would agree that their built environment and walkability is more urban, in comparison.
No disagreement. Your observation is spot on. It is true not only for just NY cities but other older cities in every northeastern state: Wilmington, Allentown, Hartford, Worcester, Portland, Manchester and on and on.
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Old 12-07-2017, 11:29 AM
 
56,517 posts, read 80,824,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Or in comparison to similarly sized cities in the areas the OP was referring to based upon built environment. For instance, cties like say Utica or Schenectady in NY, in terms of the city proper, has as many people as Greenville does in smaller land areas. This is considering that both of those NY cities are below their peak population and suffered some degree of urban renewal without any recent annexation. Yet if you look at the built environments of those NY cities, I think most would agree that their built environment and walkability is more urban, in comparison.
Just more illustration of the point: https://theurbanphoenix.com/2016/04/...g-on-a-friday/

@Pine to Vine, exactly. All of those cities if they were in most Southern states would probably have twice as many people due to annexation within the past few decades.
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Old 12-07-2017, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,581 posts, read 3,994,519 times
Reputation: 2906
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Yeah. Honestly, he derailed the thread from his first post. The question was why the most walkable cities were in cold climates. His response was basically "no you are wrong" and then proceeded to redefine walkability to mean something which made his hometown look reasonably well (e.g., a place you can drive to, park, and walk around in nice weather, with amenities that cater to his interests in particular).

There is nothing wrong with being a homer. I think everyone should have pride in where they live, or move somewhere else. But unless you have actually been to places, you should not act like you are an expert. That's the reason I avoid City Vs. City discussions which compare Pittsburgh to cities I've never even visited.
Generally the people that call me a homer are the true homers. You act like it is a slight to northern cities for me to say southern cities are as walkable. And I think there are a lot of people on here who are often making assertions about the south but haven't spent much time in southern cities.

I don't think you and others can articulate what amenities that Greenville doesn't have that northern cities do, outside of pro sports teams.
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Old 12-07-2017, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,581 posts, read 3,994,519 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
[/b]
I knew it... you're purposely being obtuse in order to try to give the South some credit on walkability. Which is odd because nobody said the South didn't have walkable areas but rather Northern cities tend to be more walkable. I called it a few pages back.
I've noticed that you seem eager to be negative about the south on here in past interactions with you. If I say anything positive about SC, Greenville, or the south, it seems to annoy you.

Why are you and others up north so focused on the south anyway? I see these North vs South threads with silly generalizations all the time. Every city in the south has a different layout.

I have no obligation to validate your opinions about the south on here or confirm your definition of 'walkability' which is a subjective concept.

If a person doesn't think southern cities are as walkable, he or she has two options. Either accept it the southern cities are not as walkable, or move to a northern city that he or she thinks is more walkable.

Last edited by ClemVegas; 12-07-2017 at 12:35 PM..
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Old 12-07-2017, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,581 posts, read 3,994,519 times
Reputation: 2906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
I think what you’re saying is that while some of these southern “cities” (say, Greenvile), may be walkable, there is just not a lot to walk to.
How do you know there isn't a lot to walk to in Greenville? How do you define a lot to walk to?

What do northern cities have that Greenville doesn't?
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