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Old 12-07-2017, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,582 posts, read 3,999,195 times
Reputation: 2913

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
If you are specifically meaning every day activities then almost every city has everyday amenities nearby. No city is unique with the ability to go to a restaurant or a movie theatre.
My point is that I see people on here who live in NYC and other cities up north who act like life is more exciting up north because of more 'things to do'.

You said you would be bored in downtown Greenville because it doesn't have enough blocks for you. When I think of being bored, I think in terms of activities or not having anybody to hang out with, not in terms of number of blocks in a downtown area.

They could triple the number of restaurnats and bars in downtown Greenville, but that would only give you more options. It wouldn't add more things to do. You can only drink at one bar at a time, and eat at one restaurant at a time.
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Old 12-07-2017, 01:21 PM
 
2,507 posts, read 2,269,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
My point wasn't about attractions that visitors come for. It was about daily life amenities for residents. You realize that you were talking about daily residential life in cities, right? So why did you pivot to talking about tourist attractions.
Going to watch a Broadway show or going to the Smithsonean are regular activities that residents partake in. I go to the Smithsonean probably once every 2 months and even though I'm not in NYC, I watch a show on Broadway about 5 times a year. Perhaps this is why some people would assume others cities are more exciting because activities like these are just the norm which most other cities don't possess.
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Old 12-07-2017, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,582 posts, read 3,999,195 times
Reputation: 2913
You go to a museum in every city though or a play in every city. That's not unique.

Most visit DC and NYC at some point so they can visit those venues. I don't think it is a much of a selling point to live there for a significant number of people.
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Old 12-07-2017, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
2,083 posts, read 1,102,334 times
Reputation: 1851
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
You go to a museum in every city though or a play in every city. That's not unique.

Most visit DC and NYC at some point so they can do those things. I don't think it is a much of a selling point to live there for a significant number of people.
Live music venues, museum access, art scene. Those are all huge selling points. The more the better. And to come full circle, the more you can walk to, the better. Many people in urban environments choose which neighborhood they live in based on what kind of amenities it provides.

If you follow the gentrification process of a neighborhood, what are some commonalities? Generally, starving artists, actors, penetrate a location because it's cheap and accessible. Then, stores in those neighborhood follow- cafes, art shops, comedy clubs, live music venues, local museums. Places are established where the influx of population can walk to. Then what happens? People with affluence and more buying power move into the neighborhoods for the amenities and convenience.

Do you think the wealthy move in to live with the starving artists? Or do you think they move in because of the music venues, art shops, museums, etc.?

It's the latter, because those amenities are a huge draw.
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Old 12-07-2017, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,582 posts, read 3,999,195 times
Reputation: 2913
Greenville has all of that and so do other southern cities. In my opinion, you are making a 'homer' point if you believe plays in NYC are better than plays in cities in the south, or museums in northern cities are better than museums in southern cities.
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Old 12-07-2017, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
2,083 posts, read 1,102,334 times
Reputation: 1851
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
Greenville has all of that and so do other southern cities. In my opinion, you are making a 'homer' point if you believe plays in NYC are better than plays in cities in the south, or museums in northern cities are better than museums in southern cities.
My point is that the frequency and amount of museums, art studios, and live music venues directly correlates with the desirability of a neighborhood (and more broadly, a city).

When someone moves out of NYC to, say, Boston, that person is going to miss the plethora of options in NYC compared to Boston. And for that reason, many people will never move from NYC.

Now, again, the more options you have spread throughout a city and neighborhoo, the more walkable it becomes. People, at least in the north, pay BIG money for walkability to venues, studios, museums, and the like.

So, it's a big draw. For sure.
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Old 12-07-2017, 01:53 PM
 
2,507 posts, read 2,269,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
Greenville has all of that and so do other southern cities. In my opinion, you are making a 'homer' point if you believe plays in NYC are better than plays in cities in the south, or museums in northern cities are better than museums in southern cities.
Anderson, SC has all that too, so Greenville and Anderson are the same in quality of amenities I suppose based on your logic.

I'm pretty sure most rankings of Museums would place the ones in NYC and DC higher then most in the South. I also believe the Tony's is a better source for theatre quality.

Since you used Tripadvisor to note that the park in Greenville was top 10, I'll also use tripadvisor for best museums. Looks like mostly in Northern and Western Cities.

1. MET, NYC
2. WWII, New Orleans
3. Art Institute, Chicago
4. 911 Memorial & Museum, NYC
5. USS Midway, SD
6. Air & Space, DC
7. Getty, LA
8. Natural History, NYC
9. Moma, NYC
so on and so on.....

Last edited by Ebck120; 12-07-2017 at 02:26 PM..
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Old 12-07-2017, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,852 posts, read 7,799,244 times
Reputation: 9469
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Just more illustration of the point: https://theurbanphoenix.com/2016/04/...g-on-a-friday/

@Pine to Vine, exactly. All of those cities if they were in most Southern states would probably have twice as many people due to annexation within the past few decades.
Loved the pix!
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Old 12-07-2017, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,852 posts, read 7,799,244 times
Reputation: 9469
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Plenty of southern cities have walkable cores. But that doesn't mean that they are as walkable, because, as I and other posters have repeatedly noted, the prewar core of most southern cities was very small compared to the average northeastern city, and basically everywhere in the country, from 1945 up until maybe 20 years ago, we just stopped building new walkable neighborhoods - at best maintaining the old ones.
It's not fun to walk on sidewalks fronted by strip malls in the heat.

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7420...7i13312!8i6656
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Old 12-07-2017, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,920,328 times
Reputation: 10536
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
My point is that I see people on here who live in NYC and other cities up north who act like life is more exciting up north because of more 'things to do'.

You said you would be bored in downtown Greenville because it doesn't have enough blocks for you. When I think of being bored, I think in terms of activities or not having anybody to hang out with, not in terms of number of blocks in a downtown area.

They could triple the number of restaurnats and bars in downtown Greenville, but that would only give you more options. It wouldn't add more things to do. You can only drink at one bar at a time, and eat at one restaurant at a time.
I dunno about that. I mean, I have lived in Pittsburgh for over 12 years now, and I know the city pretty intimately. There just isn't that much new to discover which is relevant to my interests. I mean, new things do open all the time - cities always change. But I know all of the neighborhoods, have spent time in all the business districts - done all of the things which are relevant to my interests now.

The smaller a city is, the quicker you hit that point. I remember when I went to college and graduate school in Western Massachusetts. I picked up a zine (showing my age) which had a "guide to the underground scene in the Valley." It promised "all the hippest bars" and "all the coolest CD stores." The bars were the ones I went to, and the CD stores were the ones I shopped at. I'm a giant nerd, and I was, apparently, ensconced in the hip underground of the area. That was one of those "I have to get out of dodge" moments, because I felt like there wasn't much left to explore, and I wanted to be somewhere I felt more faceless and anonymous again.

In contrast, if you live in NYC, you will likely never hit that point, as long as you're comfortable moving around and exploring new things.
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