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Old 12-13-2017, 08:02 PM
 
3,216 posts, read 1,543,956 times
Reputation: 2332

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Some boast they or a husband can walk to work ...... who can afford to live in a downtown of a major city. Sadly most people cannot. I live in a walkable small city close to everything myself and walk to much. But for work i need to travel to a industrial park ..... literally on top of a mountain along a PA major interstate. Very convenient for trucking there. But no body lives that close. I drive over a couple mountains to get there.

I'd love to live in a high-rise in downtown Chicago (or loft of Victorian gilded age home) with a view and walk to everything INCLUDING WORK..... But you need to be a top professional too afford it or be couple with extremely good pay.

It's great to boast your city has this walk to everything and work. But even in walkable regular neighborhoods. Many may need a car for work. That luxury of the mill down the street (in past eras) or office is generally not theirs.

I also like to see green fronts and trees in walkable areas. Tight row-homes with no frontage and lacking trees.... even walkable as they are and if sidewalks are wide enough and not blocked or cars partially on the sidewalks because the street so so narrow. That looses points for me and a very narrow row that even a car spot it can't support for those who need one.

At least I do not have to endure a slow moving expressway in a major city. But I'd ditch a car if I could.
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Old 12-13-2017, 08:15 PM
 
4,479 posts, read 2,661,399 times
Reputation: 4083
In most cities, you can have a typical white collar job (say 50-100k) and live in/near Downtown pretty easily. Of course it's much easier with no car, debt, housepets, or kids especially at the bottom end.

Chicago is one of those. Even Seattle. Not Manhattan or San Francisco.
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Old 12-13-2017, 09:07 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,155,936 times
Reputation: 4349
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
I do things much less the farther they are away, despite being known as a committed pedestrian. That goes for coffee shops, museums, and everything else.

As for walking to work, it's incredible. It's a huge stress avoided. The idea of not controlling my arrival time was stressful at best, and always potentially disruptive. Now if I need to show up a little early, and be absolutely sure of being on time for a meeting or deadline, piece of cake. Same at the end of the day. Even if I leave at 6:30 I'll be home in 8-10 minutes, or 11-15 with groceries or takeout (corner stores with no lines are essential!).
Quote:
Originally Posted by RocketSci View Post
Many of us are not as able as we were in our younger days, yet still enjoy walking to accessible nice things.
That makes sense, and it's not as if I haven't dreamed about living in New York, but I simply see that level of walkability being the exception rather than the rule.
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Old 12-13-2017, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Virginia Beach
4,207 posts, read 2,823,898 times
Reputation: 4493
I have a blue collar job and I live a 30-minute walk from work--I actually walked last Thursday and it took me 31 minutes but I was also in rain. I normally don't walk because it's cold now and I'm a bit of a procrastinator, but I consider a half-hour walk to be walkable, though by the sounds of others on this thread, a half-hour (2 miles) seems like it's stretching walkability...

Within four blocks of my home is a Latino supermarket, a European/Russian grocery store, about three or four restaurants, a corner store. Within eight blocks of my home are a grip of other restaurants, a grocery store, shoe store, cleaners, several car dealerships, dentist, a couple banks. Elsewhere within a two-time radius (so a 30-35 minute walk) is a performing arts center, library branch, gym, movie theatre, countless restaurants and at least a dozen shopping boutiques, cell phone carriers, self-storages, FedEx and UPS, two more grocery stores, Sam's Club, BJ's, children's urgent care, eye doctor's, another dentist...and on the edge of walkability (2.1 miles) is a smaller shopping mall. And I live literally about a half-mile from the largest and most popular park in the city--but we're separated by I-264, with no ramps or bridges across it, so it turns into a 3-mile/10 minute drive...

Walkability is relative and a half-hour is about the longest I'd be willing to walk to something, give or take five minutes, but I consider anything within that 2-mile circumference as walkable...
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Old 12-14-2017, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,054 posts, read 3,379,100 times
Reputation: 7690
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemVegas View Post
I don't think a lot of 'walkable' areas up north are safe or visually appealing with nice housing in the area.

It seems to me you've rigged this discussion to favor big cities with more people and larger footprints. Obviously bigger cities have 'more' of everything, but the OP never framed the topic in terms of quantity.

'More' is irrelevant if a person can only live in one spot. If a person wants a walkable situation, he or she can get it in the south.

https://www.google.com/maps/@44.9399...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@44.9485...7i13312!8i6656

I beg your pardon.
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Old 12-14-2017, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,054 posts, read 3,379,100 times
Reputation: 7690
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
I do things much less the farther they are away, despite being known as a committed pedestrian. That goes for coffee shops, museums, and everything else.

As for walking to work, it's incredible. It's a huge stress avoided. The idea of not controlling my arrival time was stressful at best, and always potentially disruptive. Now if I need to show up a little early, and be absolutely sure of being on time for a meeting or deadline, piece of cake. Same at the end of the day. Even if I leave at 6:30 I'll be home in 8-10 minutes, or 11-15 with groceries or takeout (corner stores with no lines are essential!).
I got a job literally behind my house after having my car die on me for good. I had a job in the suburbs which I had when the car worked.. but without the car it was a hassle to get there.. plus I was barely making enough money to make ends meet. This is the second job I've had that is walking distance to me, though this one is unbelievably close. I could throw a snowball from my backyard and hit the back wall of my job, I love how close it is!
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Old 12-14-2017, 04:07 PM
 
3,548 posts, read 1,516,044 times
Reputation: 2989
Quote:
Originally Posted by Space_League View Post
Where to start...

Houston

Phoenix

San Antonio

Dallas

Jacksonville

Orlando

Atlanta

Charlotte

Memphis

Tampa


I can't name a single one that is truly walkable like NY, SF, Boston or Philly.

Maybe Baltimore?
This is proof that the buzz word "walkable" is very relative. Every Southern city you mentioned is "walkable". I've been to all of them and had no problems. BUT, NY/SF/Boston (not as much Philly) are truly more walkable. But there's a high price to pay for that. "Walkable" in many people's definition means high density.......which means high taxation and bloated housing prices, to the point that it prices most people out of home ownership. Then the very ones who want the "walkable" areas and high density then march and complain about the lack of affordable housing, lol. It's just basic economics. You have to pick. But in areas like the Southern cities you named, you have a mixture of different options. If you want walkable, there are those areas. If you want tract homes, they have those. Lake property. Acerage. You have choices. You're not forced by social engineering to go in a direction the government thinks is "best" for you. To me, it's the best happy medium. It keeps housing affordable with a wide range of options. Anyway, that's my take. Interesting discussion.
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Old 12-14-2017, 04:50 PM
 
56,517 posts, read 80,824,285 times
Reputation: 12480
Quote:
Originally Posted by march2 View Post
This is proof that the buzz word "walkable" is very relative. Every Southern city you mentioned is "walkable". I've been to all of them and had no problems. BUT, NY/SF/Boston (not as much Philly) are truly more walkable. But there's a high price to pay for that. "Walkable" in many people's definition means high density.......which means high taxation and bloated housing prices, to the point that it prices most people out of home ownership. Then the very ones who want the "walkable" areas and high density then march and complain about the lack of affordable housing, lol. It's just basic economics. You have to pick. But in areas like the Southern cities you named, you have a mixture of different options. If you want walkable, there are those areas. If you want tract homes, they have those. Lake property. Acerage. You have choices. You're not forced by social engineering to go in a direction the government thinks is "best" for you. To me, it's the best happy medium. It keeps housing affordable with a wide range of options. Anyway, that's my take. Interesting discussion.
There is a range in the Northeast and Midwest as well. Walkable doesn’t necessarily mean high density, but is more about built environment.

Due to earlier development, cities in those northern regions, even if they don’t have a very high population density still have areas with walkability. This goes beyond the city center, but may be the case for suburban and satellite villages/boroughs and small cities. There will be variation due to size, but you can find a range of walkable areas.

Also, even in the Northeast and Midwest, you could find walkable neighborhoods with affordable housing prices that are solid and generally “safe”. It may be a matter of looking into less “popular” or lesser known areas of those regions.
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Old 12-14-2017, 07:07 PM
 
1,290 posts, read 1,199,293 times
Reputation: 3030
Quote:
Originally Posted by march2 View Post
This is proof that the buzz word "walkable" is very relative. Every Southern city you mentioned is "walkable". I've been to all of them and had no problems. BUT, NY/SF/Boston (not as much Philly) are truly more walkable. But there's a high price to pay for that. "Walkable" in many people's definition means high density.......which means high taxation and bloated housing prices, to the point that it prices most people out of home ownership. Then the very ones who want the "walkable" areas and high density then march and complain about the lack of affordable housing, lol. It's just basic economics. You have to pick. But in areas like the Southern cities you named, you have a mixture of different options. If you want walkable, there are those areas. If you want tract homes, they have those. Lake property. Acerage. You have choices. You're not forced by social engineering to go in a direction the government thinks is "best" for you. To me, it's the best happy medium. It keeps housing affordable with a wide range of options. Anyway, that's my take. Interesting discussion.
Government most certainly drove the mandatory setbacks, mandatory minimum parking requirements, lack of maintained (or missing) sidewalks, and pedestrian-unfriendly road designs that is a de-facto "social engineering" away from the development of pedestrian friendly neighborhoods in Houston. In response, another "social engineering" exercise to recover a semblance of life in a dead downtown is the city's "Downtown Living Initiative" tax break in constructing luxury high-rise apartments in selected downtown areas. Houston, at least, definitely "social engineered" affordable walkability away from most people by it's car-centered development rules and practices.

Regarding lake property, acreage, tract housing, etc - there is plenty of that up North - I don't understand why it was stated as if that was somehow unique to southern cities.
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Old 12-14-2017, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,581 posts, read 3,994,519 times
Reputation: 2906
Would this not be considered comparable to a walkable urban area up north?

Five Points neighborhood in Jacksonville. 5 Points Jax – A Bohemian Neighborhood

Nearby King Street in Riverside. http://kingstreetjax.com/

https://www.visitjacksonville.com/ar...side-avondale/

Some stuff on nearby St Johns Avenue: https://www.google.com/maps/@30.2970...7i13312!8i6656

What about San Marcos on the other side of the river from downtown Jax? https://www.google.com/maps/@30.3037...7i13312!8i6656

Last edited by ClemVegas; 12-14-2017 at 10:13 PM..
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