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Old 12-14-2017, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,582 posts, read 3,997,005 times
Reputation: 2911

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What about the South End n'hood south of Uptown Charlotte?

https://historicsouthend.com/

It is on the light rail line too.


THere is Carytown in Richmond: http://www.carytownrva.com/

And the Fan District around VCU.

in Raleigh, the Glendale South district: http://www.godowntownraleigh.com/dis...glenwood-south

Last edited by ClemVegas; 12-14-2017 at 10:30 PM..
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Old 12-14-2017, 10:17 PM
 
4,480 posts, read 2,663,831 times
Reputation: 4085
Agreed RocketSci...goverment social engineering separated uses, continues to require huge amounts of parking, favored sprawl over renovation through the GI Bill, has generally favored roads over transit, designs most roads for liablity and drivers only while making other modes unsafe...
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Old 12-14-2017, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
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The downtown of Greer about 10 minutes from downtown Greenville could be described as a neighborhood.

https://greerstation.com/
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Old 12-14-2017, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Philly
1,034 posts, read 724,614 times
Reputation: 2555
Quote:
Originally Posted by Space_League View Post
Why can't we build compact, walkable cities in warm climates? Who cares if you can walk to amenities in Boston in January, I would rather be in my warm car. But go down to LA where it's 70 degrees out in "winter" and all of a sudden you need a car..
A lot of cities in warmer climates did have a walkable urban fabric. One of the best examples of this is Downtown Los Angeles. Unfortunately, the auto lobby, redlining policies, and politicians who wanted giant highways in downtown areas won. Unwalkable cities in areas of the country that have warmer weather patterns is the result of this nation's obsession with the car and auto-oriented infrastructure. Because of investment in highways and a lack of investment in cities (especially around public transportation), cities hollowed out while suburbs flourished (which was the work of the federal government, specifically through the FHA's loan policies). Old, ornate buildings were seen as "obsolete" and had to be razed to accommodate the car. There's a really interesting video on YouTube that demonstrates how the "urban" planners of the day thought.

It's funny: Dwight Eisenhower originally envisioned that highways would NOT pass through city centers. This would change as urban politicians and the auto lobby pushed for highways to intrude upon city centers. Because of that, only a few major cities (Boston, NYC, Philly, Baltimore, DC, Chicago, San Fran, and, increasingly, Seattle) are walkable. Even fewer are walkable outside of their cores, which is one thing that I really appreciate about living in Philadelphia and the Northeast in general.
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Old 12-15-2017, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,850 posts, read 7,797,618 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by march2 View Post
This is proof that the buzz word "walkable" is very relative. Every Southern city you mentioned is "walkable". I've been to all of them and had no problems. BUT, NY/SF/Boston (not as much Philly) are truly more walkable.
I beg your pardon. Many of are walking: Center City District Reports Philadelphia's Downtown Population Is Now The Second Largest In The Entire Country
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Old 12-15-2017, 08:00 PM
 
3,212 posts, read 1,546,799 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
You do know this was a far greater Center City Philly area used. Philadelphians love to use a Greater Center City plus into University City.... but it ALL IS NOT THE DOWNTOWN counted here. Why previous threads on this months ago. Debunked it as a much greater area used for downtown.

The irony is Chicago still can match and exceed these Philly claims by area. Even with a larger area utilized by offices as the Loop region is. Philly's Center City and Greater..... was ALWAYS RESIDENTIAL full of row-housing. Chicago's was not. The Loop itself once had virtually none. Today downtown is more then the Loop and it sure looks it too ad last few decades it grew its residential core greatly. Last census proved its core was the fastest growing in the nation. Also much more high-rise to skyscraper living then Philly and parts once warehousing became lofts.

This isn't to denounce Philly as a top populated core. But these stats used a oversized downtown area. Chicago defines its Central Business District on its city websight. This is its downtown or the minimum. Philly doesn't.... though it has its Center City and Greater Center City area.

But CBDs and downtowns seem to have no true standard in cities. Some Google street-view defines and some it does not. It defines Philly's Center City but does not define a downtown. For Chicago it defines JUST THE LOOP to the Lake as its downtown and the Near North region north of the Loop is clearly part of its downtown too and certainly looks it.

Chicago doesn't even declare most of its Gold Coast as its CBD .... but I would. Highly residential but heck..... Philly has whole areas of Center City as Row-housing and as its downtown grandfathered in.

Downtown Chicago north and outside of the Loop (that alone was its original downtown) and looks it.

Last edited by DavePa; 05-01-2018 at 07:24 AM..
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Old 12-15-2017, 08:38 PM
 
4,480 posts, read 2,663,831 times
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Yes, that #2 Philly claim has been widely debunked.
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Old 12-15-2017, 09:47 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,120 posts, read 23,642,005 times
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Why not just take contiguous blobs of both cities and compare?
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Old 12-16-2017, 06:08 AM
 
3,212 posts, read 1,546,799 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Why not just take contiguous blobs of both cities and compare?
It was using that link in Philly's walkability defense. Of course Philly is highly walkable. Just threads on that links claim. Showed the Greater area used. It then gives Chicago reason to use a Greater area or any city. Had no .... blobs on Philly in walkability as was the defense in using the link.
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Old 12-16-2017, 10:41 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,120 posts, read 23,642,005 times
Reputation: 11611
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
It was using that link in Philly's walkability defense. Of course Philly is highly walkable. Just threads on that links claim. Showed the Greater area used. It then gives Chicago reason to use a Greater area or any city. Had no .... blobs on Philly in walkability as was the defense in using the link.
Right, but why not just take census results or estimates and just see how much continuous high density tracts there are in the downtown area after a set number of square miles? That should be a pretty decent proxy. I know that in the past, Chicago had hardly anyone living in downtown, but that's been undergoing a massive change in the last couple decades, not just the Loop itself, but several neighborhoods near it that are arguably part of an expanded downtown. It might be at this point, Chicago has actually more people living in downtown and its adjacent neighborhoods than Philadelphia does in Center City and its adjacent neighborhoods. At the very least, it seems like the numbers have to be a lot closer now than they were a decade ago.
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