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Old 12-17-2017, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,123 posts, read 1,314,886 times
Reputation: 1831

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
Houston in the 1920s had a dense walkable downtown:


https://www.pinterest.com/pin/8725792999313278/

Then came AC. People no longer needed to go downtown for shopping and for other necessities and amenities. They could take care of life’s needs in a suburban air conditioned paradise. As these services decentralized, buildings were razed and parking lots and garages were put in their place. The once dense walkable downtown looks like this today:


https://www.houstonpublicmedia.org/a...an-fatalities/


https://www.emporis.com/buildings/19...houston-tx-usa
I like the first pic. Does anyone have a present day picture of that location? Or Google street view coordinates?

And that last photo — I think that those multi-level parking garages are 10,000X better than surface lots.
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Old 12-17-2017, 11:51 AM
 
1,322 posts, read 1,211,264 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
I like the first pic. Does anyone have a present day picture of that location? Or Google street view coordinates?

And that last photo — I think that those multi-level parking garages are 10,000X better than surface lots.
The picture was the corner of Texas and Main Street, looking SW at the 600 block:
https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7598...7i13312!8i6656

Just for grins, here is what a walkable corner looks like in a cold weather city (in this case Younge and Dundas in Toronto) - it is difficult to find Houston street views with actual people walking.
https://www.google.com/maps/@43.6563...7i13312!8i6656
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Old 12-17-2017, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,123 posts, read 1,314,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringSnow View Post
Houston's indoor retail is probably related to the fact most retail around the USA is indoors. It's rare to find a city that embraces the outdoors in the USA. I don't see Houston to be any more exceptional in this regard.
I think you’re onto something here.

To join in on the weather talk: both hot and cold weather can be uncomfortable in different ways. Both have their ups and downs but it really all comes down to personal preference. If I had to choose I would go with hot weather over cold easily for walking, but cold weather is better for subways/underground at least.
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Old 12-17-2017, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,123 posts, read 1,314,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RocketSci View Post
The picture was the corner of Texas and Main Street, looking SW at the 600 block:
https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7598...7i13312!8i6656

Just for grins, here is what a walkable corner looks like in a cold weather city (in this case Younge and Dundas in Toronto) - it is difficult to find Houston street views with actual people walking.
https://www.google.com/maps/@43.6563...7i13312!8i6656
Very interesting. So it looks a little different but still seems like it kept a decently walkable structure. But you’re right — there are no people out at all.
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Old 12-17-2017, 01:38 PM
 
4,492 posts, read 2,685,055 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
I like the first pic. Does anyone have a present day picture of that location? Or Google street view coordinates?

And that last photo — I think that those multi-level parking garages are 10,000X better than surface lots.
But still 1/10,000th as good as actual uses.
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Old 12-17-2017, 01:44 PM
 
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If its not windy, cold is easier to deal with for walking than heat. You can wear layers for warmth but there's not much you can do in the heat.
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Old 12-17-2017, 01:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
If its not windy, cold is easier to deal with for walking than heat. You can wear layers for warmth but there's not much you can do in the heat.
Windy just makes it feel colder, depending on the temperature it can be dead calm and still have that effect.

Heat makes you uncomfortable and sweaty but cold downright hurts. In Singapore, I can be outside all day and we're talking about 90 degrees and very humid. But a downright bitterly cold day I can add layers and be so miserable I can stay only minutes outside.

Any more layers and you're effectively indoors anyway
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Old 12-17-2017, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,123 posts, read 1,314,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
But still 1/10,000th as good as actual uses.
True. I was expecting a sea of surface lots instead though so this is better than my expectations.
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Old 12-17-2017, 03:16 PM
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Status: "Feeling suspicious" (set 9 days ago)
 
812 posts, read 417,786 times
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For me, if I'm walking or doing any other kind of outdoor activities, it would have to be insanely cold to not be able to handle it. Like sub-zero Fahrenheit or lower.
Heat? Yeah, anything above 80 gets sweaty and uncomfortable unless humidity is extremely low. Even then, no higher than 80. If the humidity is really high, I'd prefer below 60.
From my experience, not only are northern areas more walkable, people were vastly more likely to go for a walk regardless of the actual walkability of the specific place they live in.
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Old 12-17-2017, 05:03 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,839 posts, read 1,318,119 times
Reputation: 3223
Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
Very interesting. So it looks a little different but still seems like it kept a decently walkable structure. But you’re right — there are no people out at all.
If you look at the 2016 google maps there are a few people walking around, but still not many for how big Houston is. One of my buddies works a few blocks from there and most people use the tunnels to move between buildings to get lunch or whatever. The only time you will see alot of peds is for a game or at 5pm.

Walk-ability is possible in the south, take NOLA for example which has absolutely terrible weather. You almost have to be built only for walk-ability to make people walk in the south though. (actually almost anywhere)

Even when I lived in victory Park in Dallas(part of uptown near downtown) If I was going out in the summer I would take an uber instead of walk 15 min to the bars and then walk back. Mid to high 90s with humidity is just absolutely miserable to walk in, so much worse than the cold.

I don't think the primary reason the North grew first was the personal weather preference before AC as people keep suggesting,. I think it has way more to do with what types of economies that grew up in those regions.

That said, while there are ways to make walking in hot climates less miserable, I still think it is significantly more uncomfortable to walk and sweat in the heat than to put an extra layer on in the cold. Thats just my opinion having lived in both.
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