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Old 03-10-2018, 11:14 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
945 posts, read 418,441 times
Reputation: 460

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Space_League View Post
Why can't we build compact, walkable cities in warm climates? Who cares if you can walk to amenities in Boston in January, I would rather be in my warm car. But go down to LA where it's 70 degrees out in "winter" and all of a sudden you need a car..
This is true. The east coast is more dense, compact, and crowded and you can rely on public transportation to navigate around east coast cities.

The west coast is more spacious and there is less population density. Cities tend to appear suburban in real life. You would need a car to get everywhere. I heard public transportation is bad out west.

The east coast was settled first. When America was established, obviously cars were not invented. People just rode horses with wagons. Boston is so historical and that was the first place discovered in America. You can tell that it has more history than NYC, because look at the shape of the roads. It's not a grid pattern like NYC. NYC looks like it was built on a grid, so it has to be more modern than Boston. Cars were not invented when any of these east coast cities were established. It didn't matter how wide apart things were or how sparse the population was. People needed a short ride somewhere.

West coast cities were also established before cars too. I assume less people lived out west back in the remaining years of not having cars invented. Americans had to struggle to travel and establish lives out west before cars were invented. It has taken people months to travel across the country with their horse and wagon.
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Old 03-10-2018, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Avondale, Chicago
14,423 posts, read 26,271,049 times
Reputation: 9460
The Sun Belt cities grew and developed in the age of car-centric sprawl, when cities started being designed for cars and not people.

Older cities in the South, particularly those with geographic constraints - from smaller like Charleston, South Carolina and Galveston, Texas to larger like New Orleans - aren't built like that.
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Old 03-10-2018, 01:09 PM
 
4,500 posts, read 2,688,857 times
Reputation: 4120
Quote:
Originally Posted by potanta View Post
This is true. The east coast is more dense, compact, and crowded and you can rely on public transportation to navigate around east coast cities.

The west coast is more spacious and there is less population density. Cities tend to appear suburban in real life. You would need a car to get everywhere. I heard public transportation is bad out west.

The east coast was settled first. When America was established, obviously cars were not invented. People just rode horses with wagons. Boston is so historical and that was the first place discovered in America. You can tell that it has more history than NYC, because look at the shape of the roads. It's not a grid pattern like NYC. NYC looks like it was built on a grid, so it has to be more modern than Boston. Cars were not invented when any of these east coast cities were established. It didn't matter how wide apart things were or how sparse the population was. People needed a short ride somewhere.

West coast cities were also established before cars too. I assume less people lived out west back in the remaining years of not having cars invented. Americans had to struggle to travel and establish lives out west before cars were invented. It has taken people months to travel across the country with their horse and wagon.
I don't think you mean the West Coast overall. It's more about inland and certain coastal cities. The following were transit commute share and walking commute % per 2016 Census ACS, core cities, roughly grouped. (Core cities aren't a parallel comparison, i.e. the middle half of the metro or one-tenth of the metro, but it's convenient here.)

New York: 56.6 and 10.0

DC: 36.8 and 13.3
Boston: 33.6 and 14.8
San Francisco: 33.6 and 10.6

Chicago: 27.8 and 6.7
Philadelphia: 25.7 and 8.2

Seattle: 20.8 and 10.1
Pittsburgh: 17.1 and 11.1
Baltimore: 18.4 and 6.7

Minneapolis: 13.1 and 7.2
Portland: 12.1 and 6.0
Buffalo: 11.6 and 5.8
Cleveland: 10.6 and 5.3
Miami: 11.3 and 4.2
Atlanta: 10.0 and 4.6
St. Louis: 9.8 and 4.3
LA: 10.1 and 3.5

Cincinnatti: 7.9 and 5.7
Detroit: 8.2 and 3.7
New Orleans: 7.7 and 4.7
Denver: 6.8 and 4.5

San Diego: 3.9 and 3.1
Sacramento: 3.7 and 3.1
Austin: 4.0 and 2.3
Dallas: 4.3 and 1.9
Las Vegas: 4.3 and 1.8
Houston: 4.0 and 2.1
Columbus: 3.2 and 3.0
Charlotte: 3.7 and 2.2
Phoenix: 3.4 and 1.8
Kansas City: 3.1 and 2.1
Tampa: 2.5 and 2.6
San Antonio: 3.3 and 1.7
Nashville: 2.2 and 2.0
Memphis: 2.1 and 1.9
Indianapolis: 2.0 and 1.9
Jacksonville: 2.0 and 1.6

Oklahoma City: 0.5 and 1.5
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Old 03-10-2018, 01:44 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,038 posts, read 102,742,261 times
Reputation: 33084
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
Outdoor dining occurs with heat lamps and fire pits, if that’s what concerns you: Roundup: Where To Extend The Outdoor Dining Season In Philadelphia At Restaurants With Heat Lamps Or Fire Pits
According to the article, not in the dead of winter:
"Tons of bars and restaurants in Philadelphia and beyond install heat lamps or fire pits for maximum comfort even in the chillier months of October and November. An outdoor drink or meal by a heat lamp or fire pit is sure to keep you just as warm, or warmer, as you might be inside of the restaurant.

But remember, heat lamps and fire pits are not guaranteed to be on at all times, so call ahead and check so you don’t end up outside without any heat."


Quite professional, "tons of". /s
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Old 03-10-2018, 02:45 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,619,064 times
Reputation: 6095
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
I don't think you mean the West Coast overall. It's more about inland and certain coastal cities. The following were transit commute share and walking commute % per 2016 Census ACS, core cities, roughly grouped. (Core cities aren't a parallel comparison, i.e. the middle half of the metro or one-tenth of the metro, but it's convenient here.)

New York: 56.6 and 10.0

DC: 36.8 and 13.3
Boston: 33.6 and 14.8
San Francisco: 33.6 and 10.6

Chicago: 27.8 and 6.7
Philadelphia: 25.7 and 8.2

Seattle: 20.8 and 10.1
Pittsburgh: 17.1 and 11.1
Baltimore: 18.4 and 6.7

Minneapolis: 13.1 and 7.2
Portland: 12.1 and 6.0
Buffalo: 11.6 and 5.8
Cleveland: 10.6 and 5.3
Miami: 11.3 and 4.2
Atlanta: 10.0 and 4.6
St. Louis: 9.8 and 4.3
LA: 10.1 and 3.5

Cincinnatti: 7.9 and 5.7
Detroit: 8.2 and 3.7
New Orleans: 7.7 and 4.7
Denver: 6.8 and 4.5

San Diego: 3.9 and 3.1
Sacramento: 3.7 and 3.1
Austin: 4.0 and 2.3
Dallas: 4.3 and 1.9
Las Vegas: 4.3 and 1.8
Houston: 4.0 and 2.1
Columbus: 3.2 and 3.0
Charlotte: 3.7 and 2.2
Phoenix: 3.4 and 1.8
Kansas City: 3.1 and 2.1
Tampa: 2.5 and 2.6
San Antonio: 3.3 and 1.7
Nashville: 2.2 and 2.0
Memphis: 2.1 and 1.9
Indianapolis: 2.0 and 1.9
Jacksonville: 2.0 and 1.6

Oklahoma City: 0.5 and 1.5
Shouldn't we only be looking at city proper here? Since suburbs are by default more autocentric than the city propers
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Old 03-10-2018, 03:50 PM
 
4,500 posts, read 2,688,857 times
Reputation: 4120
We are only looking at city proper as I said.

I simply acknowledged that city propers are very apples-oranges.
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Old 03-10-2018, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Avondale, Chicago
14,423 posts, read 26,271,049 times
Reputation: 9460
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
We are only looking at city proper as I said.

I simply acknowledged that city propers are very apples-oranges.
Particularly the cities merged with their county boundaries like Indianapolis, Jacksonville, Nashville, Louisville etc. or cities with territory way outside their center like Houston or San Diego.
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Old 03-10-2018, 05:45 PM
 
4,500 posts, read 2,688,857 times
Reputation: 4120
True, though some of those numbers are horrible no matter how you cut it. Let's say you include only the innermost half of Indy's commute population. Maybe it would be 2.5 or 3.0% transit ridership vs. 1.0 or 1.5% for the outer half.

Big counties can be instructive...ones that include core cities but also large suburban populations. A few:

Cook (Chicago), pop 5.2m: 18.6% transit, 4.4% walk.
King County (Seattle), pop 2.1m: 12.6% transit, 5.0% walk.
LA County, pop 10m: 6.5% transit, 2.8% walk.
San Diego County, pop 3.1m: 3.0% transit, 2.9% walk.
Dallas County, pop 2.4m: 2.9% transit, 1.5% walk.
Harris (Houston), pop 4.1m: 2.8% transit, 1.5% walk.

Also how about Manhattan...59.2% transit, 20.6% walk. With 6.0% drive alone!

Last edited by mhays25; 03-10-2018 at 05:54 PM..
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