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Old 12-08-2017, 09:22 AM
 
56,539 posts, read 80,847,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall Traveler View Post
Alaska
Iowa
Maine
North Dakota
Wyoming
South Dakota
Vermont
Montana
Mississippi
Delaware
Rhode Island
Providence is a metro of 1.6 million and if we are talking about access to a major metro area, then RI is minutes from Boston.

We already mentioned that NW Mississippi is actually in the Memphis metro area. Same with Delaware and the Philadelphia metro.

With Vermont in comparison to some of these states, it at least has parts of the state that are within an hour from Montreal.
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Old 12-08-2017, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
400 posts, read 270,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by g500 View Post
Tennessee - Nashville-------------969,587 (state does have spillover from Memphis)
Whoops I put Tennessee having spill over from Memphis! Tennessee should be removed altogether from the list.
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Old 12-08-2017, 01:38 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,808 posts, read 1,297,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by C24L View Post
The big city in New Mexico is Albuquerque and it seems like a lot of people dont consider it to be a "major" city but then again not too many peoople live in America's Land of Enchantment.Also,Wyoming does not have a big city i dont think.
Cheyenne is the biggest city in Wyoming. The entire metro is under 100k. Once I spent 3 days there because the roads closed due to snow in the pass. It's a pretty small city.

On the other hand it is the tippy top point of the "Front Range Urban Corridor" So it is only 45 or so miles from Ft Collins and about 100 miles to Denver.
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Old 12-08-2017, 01:55 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,808 posts, read 1,297,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by g500 View Post
Urban area population.
Is that supposed to be the state total of "Urban population" or just the single biggest cities urban population?

If it is the first one, there is no way Idaho has under 400k in total urban population, Boise is about 224K right now and Nampa and Meridian are about 100k each. Meridian might be pretty suburban in nature, but I think it is what is counted as an "Urban Population" That's not even counting Twin Falls or Idaho Falls which must have at least 50k in urban population each.

If it is the second, the note about Spokane is irrelevant because Boise and Spokane are hundreds of miles away so there would be no spill over.
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Old 12-08-2017, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,488 posts, read 16,150,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
Is that supposed to be the state total of "Urban population" or just the single biggest cities urban population?

If it is the first one, there is no way Idaho has under 400k in total urban population, Boise is about 224K right now and Nampa and Meridian are about 100k each. Meridian might be pretty suburban in nature, but I think it is what is counted as an "Urban Population" That's not even counting Twin Falls or Idaho Falls which must have at least 50k in urban population each.

If it is the second, the note about Spokane is irrelevant because Boise and Spokane are hundreds of miles away so there would be no spill over.
Urban Area is a Census-defined term where the population density over a contiguous area of Census tracts meets an urban threshold. MSAs and CSAs use whole counties as the analysis units, and much of the population of those counties may not be in the urban area in or attached to the city. Therefore the UA population is typically (always?) lower than the MSA or CSA population. https://www2.census.gov/geo/pdfs/ref..._2010uadif.pdf

The note about Spokane may mean that Spokane has a larger UA, which spills over into ID, and therefore part of ID would be in a larger UA.
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Old 12-08-2017, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Washington State
18,459 posts, read 9,561,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Providence is a metro of 1.6 million and if we are talking about access to a major metro area, then RI is minutes from Boston.

We already mentioned that NW Mississippi is actually in the Memphis metro area. Same with Delaware and the Philadelphia metro.

With Vermont in comparison to some of these states, it at least has parts of the state that are within an hour from Montreal.
I had no idea Providence was that large so I retract that one. I don't call states that have suburbs of a city in another state to be a state with a metropolitan area.
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Old 12-08-2017, 04:29 PM
 
56,539 posts, read 80,847,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall Traveler View Post
I had no idea Providence was that large so I retract that one. I don't call states that have suburbs of a city in another state to be a state with a metropolitan area.
Hence, why people are calling it spillover in regards to states that have areas that are a part of a metro based in another state.
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Old 12-08-2017, 06:08 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,808 posts, read 1,297,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
Urban Area is a Census-defined term where the population density over a contiguous area of Census tracts meets an urban threshold. MSAs and CSAs use whole counties as the analysis units, and much of the population of those counties may not be in the urban area in or attached to the city. Therefore the UA population is typically (always?) lower than the MSA or CSA population. https://www2.census.gov/geo/pdfs/ref..._2010uadif.pdf

The note about Spokane may mean that Spokane has a larger UA, which spills over into ID, and therefore part of ID would be in a larger UA.
Right, and what I'm saying is that if the standard for UA is low enough that they count Coeur d'Alene as part of the UA for Spokane, there is no possible way the UA for all of Idaho is under 400k for total "Urban Areas" Post Falls, Coeur d'Alane, and Hayden aren't any more urban than Meridian or Nampa in the Treasure Valley, actually they are less so. Boise, Meridian, Nampa, and Caldwell all have higher population density than Post Falls for example.

I would believe that the treasure valley had an urban area around 400k, but not the whole state.
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Old 12-08-2017, 07:09 PM
 
Location: ATLANTA
2,129 posts, read 1,427,616 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
I think Northern Delaware is one of the most unique metros in the country. Yes, it is a key constituent of Greater Philadelphia (with Philly less than 30 miles away), but it also anchors its own metro of over 700,000 (with lots of grey overlap with Southern Chester and Delaware counties in SE Pennsylvania that could easily push it to 1 million if so counted). It also runs its own state, unlike the Philly burbs in PA and NJ. Realistically, Kent, New Castle, Cecil and Salem counties bring Northern Delaware’s “CSA” north of 900,000, with the southern portions of Delaware and especially Chester counties contributing the other 100,000.

And also unlike those New Hampshire, West Virginia, Kansas, Iowa and Mississippi examples of metro inclusion, Northern Delaware’s “CSA” (Metropolitan Division for sure) also directly borders another major metropolitan area—Baltimore. The only other “small” metro I can think of that is similar is Mercer County, New Jersey, which has Philly 30 miles to its south and NYC 70 miles to its north (and that’s unique in that it is a constituent of the metro that is geographically farther away!). All things considered (GDP, location and population), I think Northern Delaware deserves inclusion as a major metropolitan area, or one that is on “the cusp”.
As far as Delaware, Wilmington Area,,, Totally Agreed!!!
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Old 12-08-2017, 08:35 PM
 
29,893 posts, read 27,345,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall Traveler View Post
I had no idea Providence was that large so I retract that one. I don't call states that have suburbs of a city in another state to be a state with a metropolitan area.
But it does; it simply shares the metro area with (an)other state(s). Without suburbs, there wouldn't even be any such thing as a metropolitan area.
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