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Old 12-09-2017, 01:42 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Griffland219 View Post
I'm from the Chicago area, albeit a suburb very far from Downtown. It would probably be considered a "middle ring suburb." Even though you're not far from the city limits, you're fairly far removed from the "action." Some other cities aren't nearly as big as Chicago, but still have several hundred thousand people, a major urban center, and a number of suburbs. The main difference seems to be the scope of the development. Cities like Indianapolis or Cincinnati are still very large and offer a lot, and I don't think someone from Chicago's suburbs would see a huge difference living near one of those cities in terms of amenities and everyday life (save for Lake Michigan). Even Arkansas shares a border with Memphis. What states just really don't offer access to a major urban/suburban area? Assuming you're from the suburbs in the first place, would smaller cities like Des Moines, Iowa or Portland, Maine cut it?
I would say Des Moines counts as a metro area, although it's certainly smaller than Chicago. Same with Omaha. As far as places without one there are quite a few. The largest in North Dakota for example is the Fargo/Moorhead area with around 200k, in South Dakota the largest city is Sioux Falls at around the 100k mark, Montana has Billings at around 100k and in Wyoming you have Cheyenne at less than 60k, although that is sometimes lumped into the Front Range Urban Corridor in Colorado.
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Old 12-09-2017, 05:31 PM
 
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^Major is the key word. Most of those wouldn’t fit.
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Old 12-10-2017, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Erie, PA
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I have to agree in the case of Delaware and Virginia. Just because the anchor city is not in the state, doesn't mean the state doesn't have a major metropolitan area.

Northern Delaware is a large part of Philadelphia's metro and Northern Virginia is a large part of DC's metro. So, they doesn't lack a true major metro, it's just that the core city is not in their state.
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Old 12-10-2017, 04:00 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
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IMO 1 million does not constitute "major". Mid-major maybe but not "major". In the case of Virginia however, it most definitely has a major metropolis due to NOVA being about 3 million people. I would say the threshold of "major" is somewhere between 2.5- 3 million and up.
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Old 12-11-2017, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Calera, AL
1,166 posts, read 1,448,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NDak15 View Post
I would say Des Moines counts as a metro area, although it's certainly smaller than Chicago. Same with Omaha. As far as places without one there are quite a few. The largest in North Dakota for example is the Fargo/Moorhead area with around 200k, in South Dakota the largest city is Sioux Falls at around the 100k mark, Montana has Billings at around 100k and in Wyoming you have Cheyenne at less than 60k, although that is sometimes lumped into the Front Range Urban Corridor in Colorado.
Des Moines and Omaha are in similar boats (DSM is about 1/3 smaller than Omaha) - I think a case can be made for and against each city being 'major' (though Omaha's might be a little stronger since it's somewhat larger).

Fargo and Sioux Falls are similar in the sense that they're approximately the same size, but Fargo 'feels' bigger (SF is basically one giant suburb, F-M has at least hints of urbanity).
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