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View Poll Results: Is it better to
Consolidate and streamline services 14 70.00%
Leave growth to develop in an organic manner, and never change original city limits 2 10.00%
Abolish municipalities in general 2 10.00%
Many smaller municipalities function better 3 15.00%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 20. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-19-2018, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,316 posts, read 6,975,343 times
Reputation: 3504

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Quote:
Originally Posted by atadytic19 View Post
Jax like every other post automobile city would have sprawled despite consolidation.
What exactly do you mean by post-automobile city? Jax's original city limits were pretty well developed and extremely dense (by today's standards) pre-automobile. Jacksonville's streetcar system was 61 miles long and carried 20 Million passengers per year in 1930. So just curious how exactly you're defining that. (cause obviously jax is indeed a sprawling auto-centric city)

Anyway, locally/regionally it is an endless debate and some urban advocates argue that we need to return to some form of govt where there is an actual representation and advocacy for downtown and its surrounding neighborhoods.
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Old 02-19-2018, 11:28 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,297 posts, read 3,513,713 times
Reputation: 4479
Quote:
Originally Posted by projectmaximus View Post
What exactly do you mean by post-automobile city? Jax's original city limits were pretty well developed and extremely dense (by today's standards) pre-automobile. Jacksonville's streetcar system was 61 miles long and carried 20 Million passengers per year in 1930. So just curious how exactly you're defining that. (cause obviously jax is indeed a sprawling auto-centric city)
Exactly. Jax was Florida's 'Big City' for many years, with Tampa eventually coming up as an equal as well. It was even the movie capital of the U.S. prior to Hollywood being developed. Miami was nothing but a mangrove swamp back then.

Jacksonville has incredible urban bones, with many architectural gems scattered throughout the close-in neighborhoods. People that don't know what they are talking about tend to dismiss it way too handily.
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Old 02-20-2018, 06:10 AM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,341 posts, read 14,104,968 times
Reputation: 5964
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
It's a tough question with no easy answer.

On one hand, city-county consolidations allow for a city to be much more financially secure. Particularly if there is undeveloped land within the new city boundaries, it basically allows the city to capture the growth of the metropolitan region, making up for any decline in the core.

However, if too many neighborhoods which are functionally suburban are within the expanded city, this means that the city becomes dominated by...well...suburban interests. Indianapolis had this dynamic up until roughly the turn of the millennium, with Republican "suburbs in the city" controlling local government, and thus having free reign to decide on downtown revitalization projects which served their interests (e.g, more offices for commuters and sports stadiums instead of affordable housing). Another example outside of the U.S. is Toronto, where now deceased former mayor Rob Ford began removing bike lanes when he was elected mayor by a "suburban" coalition in the outer neighborhoods of Toronto.
It is disingenuous to say suburban interests within Marion County controlled a government that created a revitalized downtown, stadiums, and offices in lieu of other city interests to benefit the outer townships. In the era Indianapolis revitalized downtown, Indy was an outlier among its peer cities. The outer townships were not necessarily on board with it, and it certainly was not to their benefit over anyone else. Furthermore, there is no shortage of affordable housing in Indy. There was no conspiracy be the outer townships to deny affordable housing.
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Old 02-20-2018, 06:12 AM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,341 posts, read 14,104,968 times
Reputation: 5964
Quote:
Originally Posted by atadytic19 View Post
When you say representation, do you mean having lots of suburban voters diluting City voters like eschalon was explaining? That would be a concern for many ( such as downtown revitalization) but not All issues. In some areas bike lanes are implemented by districts rather than the City as a whole.

I'm very interested in the opinions on Wayne county MI and Allegheny county PA.
Wayne County is never going to consolidate, why the interest in opinions there?
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Old 02-20-2018, 01:04 PM
 
619 posts, read 440,520 times
Reputation: 690
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toxic Toast View Post
Wayne County is never going to consolidate, why the interest in opinions there?
The question is what benefits or detriments flow from consolidating city and county governments, not will county A, B,or C consolidate.

Consolidation for consolidation sake is silly. That's more along the lines of online pissing contests. That does nothing to increase my knowledge. What I want to know is how would a consolidation affect the area.

My interest in Wayne stem from articles about consolidated cities that claimed tangible benefits from consolidation. So even though Wayne may never consolidate, that is not the question. I'm interested in your opinion on whether opinions or interest in Detroit would be different if 50 years ago the city had a realignment.
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