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Old 03-14-2018, 11:39 AM
 
Location: I is where I is
2,097 posts, read 1,522,521 times
Reputation: 2305

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vincent_Adultman View Post
It sounds like youíre conflating the West Coast and Southern California. The stereotypes of the Bay Area, Portland, Seattle, etc. (i.e most of the West Coast) are that people are pretentious, sanctimonious, yuppies/hippies, condescending, and so forth.
Iíd say those ďassumptionsĒ for Bay Area arenít entirely inaccurate as well. Yuppies/Hippies & Far left extremists is indeed true
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Old 03-14-2018, 11:50 AM
 
233 posts, read 106,675 times
Reputation: 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
and Miami which only have water on one side
Not true.

Miami, while most of it is on the mainland, does include several small islands, and henceforth cannot be said to only have water on one side.

What's more, Miami doesn't really do much with its water front either. There are no beaches for example (unlike Chicago or even NYC), it's just mangrove forests or harbors. You're clearly thinking of Miami Beach but then, that's an island that has water on all sides.
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Old 03-14-2018, 11:55 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,720,777 times
Reputation: 30796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
I've got a mule and her name is Sal
Fifteen miles on the Erie Canal
She's a good old worker and a good old pal
Fifteen miles on the Erie Canal
We haul'd some barges in our day
Filled with lumber, coal and hay
We know every inch of the way
From Albany to Bufallo...lo

I learned that song in elementary school in Wilkes-Barre, PA.
I think every NY schoolkid learned that song, too. Over the years I have sung it occasionally to my pets and my friends' pets, substituting their names for 'Sal'.

Oh... I think I have said too much...



Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
I've never met anyone who though that NYC was only Manhattan. I mean it is literally the most on TV/ filmed city in the country. Everyone knows about Brooklyn and Queens, probably the Bronx too.

Also, NYC doesn't really have any good beaches, unless you consider Coney Island "Good."

I can't tell you how many people I have met over the years, resonably and even highly educated people, who think that Brooklyn and the Bronx are separate cities from NYC. I have even met more than one person who were under the impression that Brooklyn was in New Jersey, and even a person that though that New Jersey was the capital of New York.

Regarding NYC beaches, no, Coney is not really "Good", but then again, it is not the best beach in NYC. That would be Rockaway.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
Actually for being on a bunch of Islands NYC doesn't do a very good job with it's water front. Chicago and Miami which only have water on one side do a much better job, as do LA, Seattle, and even San Francisco.
Consider first that most of the coastal strip of all of NYC's land was alternately rocky, like in the New England sense, or marshlands. Not really suited to extensive sandy beaches, even if created artificially.

More to the point, I think the city's position as a major seaport precluded its recreational waterfront development. The coastal value was far better suited to creating as many piers for docking ships bringing in trade from all over the world as possible. The waterways between the islands and the mainland are rather narrow and full of traffic. Not excactly ideal for creating artificial beaches.

The reason cities like Miami and Chicago have the sandy, flat, recreationally suitable waterfront they do have is because those stretches were not suitable for deep water ships to dock. Otherwise, they would have turned those areas of coast into docklands.
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Old 03-14-2018, 01:44 PM
 
9,382 posts, read 9,532,267 times
Reputation: 5786
The "the coasts" are some sort of region at all, the Midwest is more like the Northeast than the West coast.
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Old 03-14-2018, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn the best borough in NYC!
1,991 posts, read 864,081 times
Reputation: 1106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
I've never met anyone who though that NYC was only Manhattan. I mean it is literally the most on TV/ filmed city in the country. Everyone knows about Brooklyn and Queens, probably the Bronx too.

Also, NYC doesn't really have any good beaches, unless you consider Coney Island "Good."

Actually for being on a bunch of Islands NYC doesn't do a very good job with it's water front. Chicago and Miami which only have water on one side do a much better job, as do LA, Seattle, and even San Francisco. Not to say NYC doesn't have some high quality parks on the water, but for how much the city comes into contact with water? Not super impressive.

NJ and Long Island have some nice beaches though that isn't necessarily widely known since they are mainly local and not national tourist attractions.
I live ten minutes from Coney Island and haven’t set foot in that beach for years. I mostly go to the rickaways. Other than that Long Island.

And for the record those types who only view New York as Manhattan are even on city data. I’ve also met sometourist with the same mindset.

I agree NYC needs to develop more development by the water. It looks like it might in the future though!
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Old 03-14-2018, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn the best borough in NYC!
1,991 posts, read 864,081 times
Reputation: 1106
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeachBum87 View Post
Not true.

Miami, while most of it is on the mainland, does include several small islands, and henceforth cannot be said to only have water on one side.

What's more, Miami doesn't really do much with its water front either. There are no beaches for example (unlike Chicago or even NYC), it's just mangrove forests or harbors. You're clearly thinking of Miami Beach but then, that's an island that has water on all sides.
Actually what youíre saying is true!
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Old 03-14-2018, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,529 posts, read 3,683,135 times
Reputation: 4115
Misconceptions? Where to begin...

As others have said, the Pacific Ocean is cold, though can be somewhat warm in spots south of Ventura, CA. Usually only in the late summer and early fall. The Pacific also modifies cold temps along the west coast. Generally, the Pacific is cold and results in coastal temps usually 15-20 degrees cooler during the warm season, and sometimes warmer temps in the winter, depending on your location. It is isn't unusual for inland Pacific NW cities to get freezing temps or even snow while coastal cities stay mild.

(related: growing up in Puget Sound and environs, we occasionally swam and it indeed was frigid, even with 90 degrees outside. But when you are 12, you tend to dismiss this and just play along!)

If you want a warm coast, I would say North Carolina and south, and of course the gulf coast, usually from July to October.
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Old 03-15-2018, 06:30 AM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,808 posts, read 1,297,032 times
Reputation: 3204
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeachBum87 View Post
Not true.

Miami, while most of it is on the mainland, does include several small islands, and henceforth cannot be said to only have water on one side.

What's more, Miami doesn't really do much with its water front either. There are no beaches for example (unlike Chicago or even NYC), it's just mangrove forests or harbors. You're clearly thinking of Miami Beach but then, that's an island that has water on all sides.
Yeah thats actually a good point, I take back Miami.
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Old 03-15-2018, 06:38 AM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,808 posts, read 1,297,032 times
Reputation: 3204
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
I think every NY schoolkid learned that song, too. Over the years I have sung it occasionally to my pets and my friends' pets, substituting their names for 'Sal'.

Oh... I think I have said too much...
Lol I learned that song too and I'm not even from NY

Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post

Consider first that most of the coastal strip of all of NYC's land was alternately rocky, like in the New England sense, or marshlands. Not really suited to extensive sandy beaches, even if created artificially.

More to the point, I think the city's position as a major seaport precluded its recreational waterfront development. The coastal value was far better suited to creating as many piers for docking ships bringing in trade from all over the world as possible. The waterways between the islands and the mainland are rather narrow and full of traffic. Not excactly ideal for creating artificial beaches.

The reason cities like Miami and Chicago have the sandy, flat, recreationally suitable waterfront they do have is because those stretches were not suitable for deep water ships to dock. Otherwise, they would have turned those areas of coast into docklands.
Yeah, I get that NYC was and still is a working port which isn't great for recreation, but my point remains that there is a ton of shore line in NYC and comparatively it feels under developed for recreation. The city isn't known for beaches, and shouldn't be.
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Old 03-15-2018, 07:22 AM
sub
 
780 posts, read 405,678 times
Reputation: 1342
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
I've got a mule and her name is Sal
Fifteen miles on the Erie Canal
She's a good old worker and a good old pal
Fifteen miles on the Erie Canal
We haul'd some barges in our day
Filled with lumber, coal and hay
We know every inch of the way
From Albany to Bufallo...lo

I learned that song in elementary school in Wilkes-Barre, PA. We had (had) canals, river boat traffic, stage routes and mules dragging cargo over the mountains. Thank you Ms. Divani--my elementary school music teacher who also knew quite a bit about history.
Bruce Springsteen recorded a rollicking version of this song on his Live in Dublin album.
I also remember it from elementary school.

The coasts have a stereotype of being liberal, but not everyone is.
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