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Old 03-16-2018, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Brew City
4,214 posts, read 2,501,359 times
Reputation: 5649

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidd_funkadelic View Post
No disrespect to you but whoever thought Chicago was on the east coast is an idiot. The sunrise? Give me a break. Also, as a native Midwesterner from the great lakes, I have to disagree with the low 40s with sunshine take. You didn't include wind chill.
It was sunny and mid 40's here in Milwaukee on Wednesday so I drove home with my moon roof open. It felt great. It was breezy which my daughter loved as she was rollerblading around the neighborhood.
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Old 03-16-2018, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Brew City
4,214 posts, read 2,501,359 times
Reputation: 5649
Quote:
Originally Posted by VA All Day View Post
hol up - somebody said theyve met...MULTIPLE people that think chicago is on the east coast? i havent even heard such nonsense from the flatearthers.
During my time in Montana I met several people who considered everything east of the Missouri/Mississippi river "East Coast". I'm sure some were being facetious while others honestly had no idea where non-Montana cities and states are actually located. I argued with a few people that the Great Lakes were in fact fresh water.
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Old 03-16-2018, 03:38 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,721 posts, read 9,018,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegabern View Post
During my time in Montana I met several people who considered everything east of the Missouri/Mississippi river "East Coast". I'm sure some were being facetious while others honestly had no idea where non-Montana cities and states are actually located. I argued with a few people that the Great Lakes were in fact fresh water.
I could not stand that mentality in Montana. To so many the world was Montana, Canada, California, and anything east was just "back east."
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Old 03-18-2018, 10:45 AM
 
7,593 posts, read 9,444,553 times
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Minneapolis has always been a bit different from other midwestern cities like Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, Milwaukee, etc, because of its relative lack of the type of heavy industry that was present in those cities. The Twin Cities started as a grain processor center for southern Minnesota and the Dakotas, thus its reason for being was somewhat different. Also, Minneapolis-St. Paul, while having a reasonable dose of Catholicism, also has a considerable Lutheran influence, especially among its Scandinavian and German descendants ( although quite a few of the German-Americans are Catholic, too).

The Twin Cities are still very midwestern, but they seem slightly different when compared to their more industrial neighbors to the east...
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Old 03-18-2018, 02:15 PM
 
4,480 posts, read 2,661,399 times
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The misconception is that cities have dense areas. Chicago does, but the rest of the region is extremely light in that category.

In 2010, the typical non-Chicago Midwest city topped out in the 20,000-30,000/sm range for census tracts. Some didn't even get to 20,000. And that was 2010...in other regions many cities have skyrocketed since then, but this has been lower-scale in the Midwest.
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Old 03-18-2018, 02:42 PM
 
2,005 posts, read 1,013,828 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
The misconception is that cities have dense areas. Chicago does, but the rest of the region is extremely light in that category.

In 2010, the typical non-Chicago Midwest city topped out in the 20,000-30,000/sm range for census tracts. Some didn't even get to 20,000. And that was 2010...in other regions many cities have skyrocketed since then, but this has been lower-scale in the Midwest.
Of course cities have dense areas. Milwaukee is fairly dense. Not sure why you think most people think the Midwest has dense areas. Some cities do, some don't. I don't believe the general consensus is that the Midwest is dense, though.
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Old 03-18-2018, 03:10 PM
 
4,480 posts, read 2,661,399 times
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The internet has sites where you can mouse over census tracts to see residential density, for 2010 and for more recent census estimates. Census numbers aren't beyond debate of course...but my post was based on their numbers.

Milwaukee does ok compared to most other Midwest cities. But it wasn't that high in 2010 and it hasn't moved much since then.
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Old 03-18-2018, 03:15 PM
 
2,005 posts, read 1,013,828 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
The internet has sites where you can mouse over census tracts to see residential density, for 2010 and for more recent census estimates. Census numbers aren't beyond debate of course...but my post was based on their numbers.

Milwaukee does ok compared to most other Midwest cities. But it wasn't that high in 2010 and it hasn't moved much since then.
SO, you're saying, MOST people think the Midwest is densely populated, or are you just trying to interject your viewpoint that it's not. Because, as we all know, most people don't think that. Sneaky.
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Old 03-18-2018, 03:19 PM
 
4,480 posts, read 2,661,399 times
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I think most people think Midwestern cities have dense areas, even while they also think they have bombed out areas.
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Old 03-18-2018, 03:25 PM
 
2,005 posts, read 1,013,828 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
I think most people think Midwestern cities have dense areas, even while they also think they have bombed out areas.
There are Midwest cities that are dense. There are also cities with bombed out areas...nationwide.

https://geovisualist.com/2015/05/18/...e-is-so-dense/
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