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Old 03-18-2018, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Avondale, Chicago
14,420 posts, read 26,252,840 times
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Detroit still has a citywide 5K/sq mi average even with all the vacancy. Despite locales like Delray, which is about to get emptied of its last thousand or so residents, included in that average.
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Old 03-18-2018, 03:37 PM
 
4,490 posts, read 2,676,874 times
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The West Coast has just about zero bombed out areas.

Regional weighted density is very different from "having dense areas." I mean the peak handful of census tracts, or some limited core area.

Also that report was using 2010 numbers. Midwest cities haven't densified much since then, but mine has grown by 20% within city limits.
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Old 03-18-2018, 03:53 PM
 
2,006 posts, read 1,022,430 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
The West Coast has just about zero bombed out areas.

Regional weighted density is very different from "having dense areas." I mean the peak handful of census tracts, or some limited core area.

Also that report was using 2010 numbers. Midwest cities haven't densified much since then, but mine has grown by 20% within city limits.
Does you post have to do with misconceptions of the Midwest, or are you just trying to go somewhere else? Never mind, you're just trying to go somewhere else. Unless it's about misconceptions about the Midwest, you're off topic. Also, it doesn't matter if your city has grown, unless it's about a misconception of the Midwest.
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Old 03-18-2018, 04:00 PM
 
4,490 posts, read 2,676,874 times
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When facts get in the way, you pout? Maybe discuss the topic instead?
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Old 03-18-2018, 04:09 PM
 
2,006 posts, read 1,022,430 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
When facts get in the way, you pout? Maybe discuss the topic instead?
Not sure what your point is, here. You stated nothing that anyone misconceives of the Midwest. That's what isn't really on topic......you're trying to go somewhere else with this.
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Old 03-18-2018, 04:13 PM
 
4,490 posts, read 2,676,874 times
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Do you have a list of approved misconceptions? You can be the gatekeeper and we'll all do our best to follow!
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Old 03-19-2018, 06:14 PM
 
2,199 posts, read 2,322,493 times
Reputation: 1941
Another misconception is that we give a **** what kids on the coasts think of our place, or that we will take **** off them.
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Old 03-19-2018, 07:07 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BeachBum87 View Post
To be fair I don't think it's so much to do with ethnic groups as it's do with a legacy of growing up in industrial and post industrial cities. Minneapolis while being a city, was more a city that organized around farming instead of industry and the culture there, at least among ethnic Whites feels a bit different when I compare to Buffalo and my Detroit. It's not a huge difference - granted. The biggest differences are when I enter the south or the northeast. I'm not even sure if they qualify as a culture shock compared to going to different countries but there norms become different.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
Minneapolis has always been a bit different from other midwestern cities like Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, Milwaukee, etc, because of its relative lack of the type of heavy industry that was present in those cities. The Twin Cities started as a grain processor center for southern Minnesota and the Dakotas, thus its reason for being was somewhat different. Also, Minneapolis-St. Paul, while having a reasonable dose of Catholicism, also has a considerable Lutheran influence, especially among its Scandinavian and German descendants ( although quite a few of the German-Americans are Catholic, too).

The Twin Cities are still very midwestern, but they seem slightly different when compared to their more industrial neighbors to the east...

Minneapolis had flour-milling factories, right downtown.
Flour Milling History | Mill City Museum
"Beginning in 1880 and for 50 years thereafter, Minneapolis was known as the “Flour Milling Capital of the World” and more informally, as the “Mill City.”"

Minneapolis Flour-Milling Industry during World War I | MNopedia
"The Minneapolis flour-milling industry peaked during World War I when twenty-five flour mills employing 2,000 to 2,500 workers played a leading role in the campaign to win the war with food. Minneapolis-produced flour helped to feed America, more than four million of its service personnel, and its allies."

Saint Anthony Falls Heritage Board
"The West Side milling district was created in 1858 when a great canal was constructed along First Street South to improve distribution of water to the fast-growing milling industry. By the 1880s, Minneapolis had become the flour milling capital of the nation, a distinction it held for the next 50 years."

Plus much more.

What is "Lutheran influence"?
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Old 03-19-2018, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Nashville TN, Cincinnati, OH
1,798 posts, read 1,165,285 times
Reputation: 2321
Most coastal elitists don't like the Midwest and the South. They views the Midwest is un-educated and fly over country, no place to visit but Chicago but not all. I would like its like 70 percent people from coasts don't like Midwest but 30 percent like the Midwest as a place to visit and or live based on my experiences.
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Old 03-19-2018, 09:18 PM
 
5,859 posts, read 14,057,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jfre81 View Post
I'm sure I will, but it doesn't make it not so.

"Rust Belt" extends outside a geographic area. N[B]YC's manufacturing went bust too and it was part of its economic nadir in the 70s, but being the financial center propped it up.[/b] Buffalo follows the same postindustrial pattern of Cleveland and similar cities with their service economies. Pittsburgh is the same thing, except that it's made itself the model the rest of the cities like it are following.
While NYC did/does have a manufacturing sector, it was nowhere near the largest sector of its economy, unlike Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse upstate, or Pittsburgh, Erie, Johnstown, et al in PA. That's what makes those cities Rust Belt, but not NYC.
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