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Old 03-20-2018, 01:28 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,166,272 times
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I honestly think PA may have the most, at least significantly changed ones in tight proximities


Philly has 4 main ones just in the metro, though commonalities among them but I can hear them right away (S Philly, NE Philly, Delco, NW burbs (even the Mennonite ones by Souderton)), Then reading its own, Scranton its own, ABE different again, Lancaster, Hershey Harrisburg, Appalachian central state, And Yinzeburgh with at least two more, NE PA (Erie-ish like NE Ohio) and the hinterlands and hunting game land region along the northern border has some central NY state qualities


PA really has quite a few


One I didn't mention and really pronounced is the Amish in western Chester and Lancaster county, you might think you are in another place and time with that one
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Old 03-20-2018, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Mars City
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It's easier to list states that don't have multiple accents than the other way around...
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Old 03-20-2018, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Florida. You got the the deep south drawl in the northern interior and panhandle, a mild twang in much of the state and then the Miami Latin style accent. You also got folks who sound pretty neutral, but do they really? I used to always think I sounded neutral but people in Minnesota say I got a twang. Not strong, but present. They're the ones who say "beg" for "bag", I say it normal! I am only counting accents from those who were raised in Florida, obviously transplants who came when they had already developed an accent dont count.
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Old 03-20-2018, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
I bet literally every single US state has more than one accent.
What about states like Wyoming or Colorado? I have no idea what makes up those accents.
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Old 03-20-2018, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by C24L View Post
different parts of Texas have different accents
But they are bound together by a single word... "y'all" I never met a Texan that preferred "you guys" to "y'all" though you def hear both. What I love about Texas is you can find a Hispanic who has the typical urban Hispanic accent (not that sifferent from Miami imho) and you can find a Hispanic who has the strongest country twang and sounds more like George Strait or Reba McEntire. Its pretty awesome. I know a Puerto Rican woman here in Minnesota who sounds just like most white Minnesotans (shes white too, as Puerto Ricans, like Cubans, are often tho not always, white) yet when she says a Spanish name, she sounds super Boricua. Its just so cool to me.
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Old 03-20-2018, 01:47 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,010 posts, read 102,606,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
What about states like Wyoming or Colorado? I have no idea what makes up those accents.
So glad you brought this up! Colorado is considered by many to have no accent, just the "TV newscaster" accent. We also don't have a lot of expressions that are unknown to people from other places, e.g. the Pittsburghese "nebby" (nosey), the midwestern "scooping snow" (shoveling), and so on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
Basically any state spread across a vast geographic area that contain or border multiple influential cities or regions?

Hell, Illinois has Chicago's accent dominating the top northeast corner, St. Louis dominating the Metro East in Illinois, and, to be overly simplistic, a rural twang in parts of central and northern Illinois and an almost Southern / Southern influenced accent down by Kentucky. This isn't counting any of the regional quirks that places like Peoria, Bloomington/Normal, Urbana/Champaign, Rockford, the Quad Cities, etc, might have.
See above. Colorado is much larger than IL.
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Old 03-20-2018, 01:56 PM
 
Location: MichOhioigan
1,546 posts, read 2,537,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
So glad you brought this up! Colorado is considered by many to have no accent, just the "TV newscaster" accent. We also don't have a lot of expressions that are unknown to people from other places, e.g. the Pittsburghese "nebby" (nosey), the midwestern "scooping snow" (shoveling), and so on.



See above. Colorado is much larger than IL.
LOL! What a funny term. I have lived in the Midwest (albeit Great Lakes region) and have never heard this expression.
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Old 03-20-2018, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Northeast states
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New York State---NYC, Long Island, Upstate NY, Western NY


Florida--Georgia kind accents in North Florida , Latin style in Miami area, Tampa area ?
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Old 03-20-2018, 02:36 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,010 posts, read 102,606,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J'aimeDesVilles View Post
LOL! What a funny term. I have lived in the Midwest (albeit Great Lakes region) and have never heard this expression.
Maybe it was just Champaign, IL. I had no idea what it meant when I first heard it.
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Old 03-20-2018, 03:48 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,587,525 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NDak15 View Post
Not out West and not in much of the Midwest.
That's not true, whites, blacks, and Latinos often speak differentlt

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Lol, yeah. I think the people who talked like that are pretty much dead now.
Pretty much lol
Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
Yeah I know. I find it kind of a shame honestly; I think that was a pretty neat way of talking.

But you get my point: people in NYC and on LI might say “Cwoffee” with that very low and elongated o sound. People in Rochester might say “oh my Gahd” with that very high and up-turned o sound.

Very different accents located in the same state.
We say "cawfee" more so than "cwofee"

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
What about states like Wyoming or Colorado? I have no idea what makes up those
Well I bet the Hispanic people there sound a little different on average from the white people.
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