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Old 03-21-2018, 10:18 AM
 
Location: The City
22,341 posts, read 32,197,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffydelusions View Post
NJ is quite different. Northern part is influenced by NYC while the southern part is influenced by Philadelphia. The difference is very noticeable and I had no idea till I spent a year in south jersey.
It seems outside of the NE esepecially people associate the Philly accent with that of NYC, they are dramtically different on structure and form though do share a few common colloquialisms it kind of ends there


they are rhotic and non rhotic as is the stark contrast of North and South Jersey you reference, and it literally changes in like two miles




Philly and Baltimore are far closer on construct than Philly and NYC (just Baltimore a little more draw but the same construct) Also Peninsula SF natives have a nearly identical structure to the Philly accent its like an Island


Cinci takes a Philly structure and adds in KY a bit


Cleveland is NYC driven (Ohio has a drastic change rom Cleveland to Cinci as well)
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Old 03-21-2018, 12:28 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,608,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
It seems outside of the NE esepecially people associate the Philly accent with that of NYC, they are dramtically different on structure and form though do share a few common colloquialisms it kind of ends there


they are rhotic and non rhotic as is the stark contrast of North and South Jersey you reference, and it literally changes in like two miles




Philly and Baltimore are far closer on construct than Philly and NYC (just Baltimore a little more draw but the same construct) Also Peninsula SF natives have a nearly identical structure to the Philly accent its like an Island


Cinci takes a Philly structure and adds in KY a bit


Cleveland is NYC driven (Ohio has a drastic change rom Cleveland to Cinci as well)
NYC is rhotic too nowadays, thay old school mobster accent is pretty much dead
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Old 03-21-2018, 09:56 PM
 
792 posts, read 439,676 times
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I'd be interested to know if anyone here has noticed (or maybe thinks) that people here in Arizona have an accent. Just wondering, because I remember talking to a guy in Canada on the phone, and he told me I had a really cute accent. (He never got into detail about it though)
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Old 03-21-2018, 10:06 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,608,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
^^Since I live in Colorado, and have also known Hispanics from Wyoming, I'd say that the vast majority of US born Hispanics in those two states talk like everyone else.
Are you sure about that?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sti-SBOrg_E
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Old 03-22-2018, 05:00 AM
 
Location: Kent, UK/ Rhode Island, US
626 posts, read 576,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
That's not true, whites, blacks, and Latinos often speak differentlt




We say "cawfee" more so than "cwofee"


I think he's just referencing the general NYC accent, while the accent(mostly) is dying, plenty of people above the age of 40 especially working class folks speak in that accent. It's not dead yet.
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Old 03-22-2018, 05:08 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,523 posts, read 7,477,679 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schmooky View Post
Alaska. Many different variants between the southeast and southwest sides, along with isolated religious communities and their particular linguistics (usually a lot of Russian spoken, but not always). The main Alaskan accent is like a west coast sound withbsome Canadian and midwesternisms in there. Itís hard to describe but kind of like slow Oregonian.
Iíve wondered where Alaska accents come from since Sarah Palin come on the scene. She sounds somewhat upper midwestern to me. Very Wisconsin or Michigan....youbetcha
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Old 03-22-2018, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,866 posts, read 7,817,078 times
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Florida. The further south you go, the more northern the accent.
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Old 03-22-2018, 09:54 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,020 posts, read 102,689,903 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Are you sure about that?
Pretty sure. I don't know what that video is supposed to "prove". You dont' know where those people were born. 24% of Hispanics in Colorado are foreign-born, with about 75% of them being born in Mexico.
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Old 03-22-2018, 12:16 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,534 posts, read 17,769,225 times
Reputation: 30881
Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post

For example, the girl at :52 in this video is presumably a New York born Hispanic, but I think she sounds more like a Chicana from LA than either a white or black New Yorker. I'm not sure how it is in Colorado and Wyoming, but I wouldn't be surprised if a similar thing exists out there.
She has a totally different accent than the Dominican guy. Presumably because she is a Mexican-American whose accent was influenced by her family and the M-A community in Corona.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
^^Since I live in Colorado, and have also known Hispanics from Wyoming, I'd say that the vast majority of US born Hispanics in those two states talk like everyone else.
Come down to New Mexico. There are at least three different New Mexican Spanish accents (spoken by people who have lived in situ for 4 centuries), not including the accents of Mexican nationals or other Spanish speaking populations. Hell, even a lot of white people from the Valley (middle Rio Grande) have the Valley accent.
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Old 03-22-2018, 01:13 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,608,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Pretty sure. I don't know what that video is supposed to "prove". You dont' know where those people were born. 24% of Hispanics in Colorado are foreign-born, with about 75% of them being born in Mexico.
Well I doubt all of the people in the video are foreign born
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