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Old 03-19-2018, 11:31 AM
 
2,798 posts, read 5,324,209 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
Idaho is less Mormon than Utah because it receives more transplants from other states, most notably California and Washington, than Utah. However, I dated a guy from Pocatello in the past, and I will have you know the area stretching from Twin Falls to Idaho Falls is, generally speaking, very Mormon.
Correct, that area of Idaho (the I-15 Corridor) is north of the SL Valley and is the most LDS area of the state. Idaho has an early history of being very anti LDS but overtime gave in.

Before the massive growth, the percentage in Idaho has always been much lower compared to Utah.

What is interesting is California has more LDS members than Idaho has, but since Idaho's total population is much smaller than California the per capita percentage is higher.
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Old 03-19-2018, 12:26 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,760 posts, read 18,397,710 times
Reputation: 31930
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Last Starfighter View Post

If a person is from Nowhere, U.S.A. and they bring a backwater provincial mentality to the Islands, which they almost always do mind you, yes, they will be rebuffed. Quickly and thoroughly.

Where is Nowhere, U.S.A., and why are the people there somehow inferior to people from Somewhere, U.S.A.?

For what its worth, the people who seem to get the most rebuffing for trying to impose their values and ways of thinking are people who move to Wherever, U.S.A from America's most well known states, like California and New York.

Sounds to me like you carry quite a bit of prejudice against people from Nowhwere.
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Old 03-19-2018, 01:49 PM
 
Location: The High Desert
7,713 posts, read 4,200,975 times
Reputation: 14560
I recall visiting relatives in California as a kid about 40 years ago and noting a general difference in things when compared to the Midwest. The people visited were not that different, being relatives, but there was a more casual atmosphere. Their friends seemed more laid back. The material culture was different down to how the houses were laid out and furnished. It was a subtle difference but recognizable. Decades later I moved to New Mexico and experienced a similar reaction. I've visited other Western states but not long enough to make a judgment.

I think that part of it has to do with the era of mass development that took place in the West. It is fairly recent when compared to the Eastern and Midwestern states. There isn't that much attention to tradition and old social conventions that there is back east. In 1930 the population of Phoenix was under 50,000, Albuquerque was 27,000, Denver was 29,000 and Boise was 22,000. The West looked to California's cities as models as population growth accelerated. California had the expertise and technology to manage the growth so it is natural that some of what we might recognize as California style or culture would pop up in the western states.

I grew up in the Midwest but, even there, when we built a new high school in the 1950s it was a California architectural firm that won the contract -- to our lasting regret. We had real winter weather and the school was a campus design so we had to trudge through sleet and snow every hour to change classes. God help you if you had to go to your locker on the way. The school covered forty acres including the football field, eight or nine buildings and parking lots.
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Old 03-19-2018, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
506 posts, read 358,454 times
Reputation: 1211
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Last Starfighter View Post
Actually, the inverse is true.


It's the people from Nowhere, USA that carry the most close-mindedness and the most prejudice.

It's the people who have gotten out into the world, and learned and experienced a range of different places, that carry the least disdain. And yes, Hawaii does require said quality in order to not offend them because all you know is your tiny postage stamp town and its way of doing things.

It was virtually without exception, the small town folk in Hawaii when I was there, who would just talk their idle petty smack about the Islands and its people for no other reason because they were "different". Well-traveled people are not taken aback by that. They are open to something other than where they come from because they learned to be once they got into the world and spread their wings.

That's my final post in this thread. I believe we're through here.
As someone who grew up in "Nowhere, USA" and eventually moved to "Somewhere, USA" after college, I'm inclined to agree with this based off my own experiences.
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Old 03-19-2018, 03:10 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,978 posts, read 9,477,363 times
Reputation: 11764
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
I guess the real question is - Does any western state hate to be associated with or influenced by California?

I rather doubt there would be any.
Montana and Wyoming residents often **** and moan constantly about Californians ruining their way of life. So yes, those two hate that influence.
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Old 03-20-2018, 12:47 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
80,939 posts, read 73,981,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
Generally speaking, people in California are a lot more open-minded and sociable than people in other Western states.

People in Montana and Wyoming are openly hostile towards transplants, who they perceive as straining their natural resources and threatening their way of life. Those people want you to leave them alone.

Arizona and Nevada are extremely transient in the major metropolitan areas, similar to Florida. Therefore, it is often challenging to befriend others and, more importantly, maintain long-term friendships in those states. It can be very isolating when you befriend someone, and they move away six months later. The extreme summertime heat in Phoenix and, to a lesser extent, Las Vegas and Tucson only compounds the isolation factor, IMO.

Idaho and especially Utah are very Mormon. Because Mormons tend to be very active in their local congregations, and those states tend to be very "homegrown," they only way for you to break into most social circles is to join an LDS church. Also, most Mormons don't drink or smoke, and while I'm not a huge fan of drinking or smoking, those are outlets by which individuals can bond and socialize.

People are quieter and more introverted (i.e., more "bookish") in Oregon and Washington, especially west of the Cascades. Everyone up there seems to be on their own agenda and OK with being alone for a majority of the time. Very different from growing up in Rhode Island or living in Orange County, I'll tell you that much.

I don't know that much about Alaska or New Mexico, but I've met some nice folks from those states. Whites in both states don't seem too radically different from the folks you'd meet on the Plans or in the Upper Midwest.

People in Colorado are very self-absorbed and extremely competitive because it's a very lifestyle-oriented place (more so than California, IMO). They would rather go skiing, snowboarding or mountain-biking than hang out with you. Their sports and hobbies come first, never others.

Finally, people in Hawaii *HATE* white people, and if the Asians in Southern California are any indication, I would venture to guess they're not too crazy about black people, either.

California, FTW.
I agree with this, except that Colorado is incredibly friendly! People passing you on the sidewalk say "hello" and are neighborly, like the Bay Area used to be, and still is in pockets. IDK about Denver, but in the small towns, and even the resort towns, people are friendly, in my experience. It's a breath of fresh air!
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Old 03-20-2018, 01:56 AM
 
Location: Moose Jaw, in between the Moose's butt and nose.
4,984 posts, read 7,438,717 times
Reputation: 1748
Well the Western US? But the West Coast US? Yes
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Old 03-20-2018, 02:02 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,595 posts, read 24,240,685 times
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California is enormous and has counties where many people have no front teeth, to counties who are rich enough to spend thousands on plastic surgery, to counties who love Trump, to counties who hate him, counties with snow, counties with beaches and a population who have never seen snow in their entire lives.

So, when anyone says some place is just like California, that pretty much encompasses the entire country.

The perception of CA from outside the state is generally very ignorant of this entire state. The whole state is not Hollywood and the entire state didn't vote for Hillary.

So any generalizations are just ignorant regarding any "typical" Californian anything.
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Old 03-20-2018, 09:36 AM
 
Location: DFW
6,819 posts, read 12,106,384 times
Reputation: 5216
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
Well, fine, maybe not Hawaii, or the subpolar areas of Alaska. But my point is, California contains all the climate types, accents, food, etc. you'll find in the (mainland) American West.

Eureka has the Marine West Coast, temperate rainforests of Puget Sound. Lassen Volcanic National Park is a mini-Yellowstone, with its many geothermal features. Tahoe rivals Oregon's Crater Lake. Ski resorts in Tahoe and Mammoth are on the scale (size-wise, and snowfall wise) as any resorts in Colorado.

We have the Mojave desert of Vegas, the Sonoran Desert of Arizona, and the rugged Great Basin of Nevada, Utah, and Idaho. We have the 14,000 mountains that rival anything in the rockies. The Bay Area's tech industry and urban hipsterness is the inspiration behind every other liberal bastion in the West from Seattle to Denver.

The entire Western US from SF to Denver and even El Paso speaks with the same American accent, with very little variation (compared to the many dialects of the South or Northeast).

To sum it up, going to other Western states basically felt like California. Seattle? Basically San Francisco with the cold gloominess of Eureka, California. Salt Lake City? Exactly the same as San Bernardino, what with the semi-arid climate, adjacent desert, and mountains, only difference being SLC was more conservative and winters were colder. Idaho Falls? Again, a colder, more conservative (i.e. Mormon) version of Visalia or Tulare. Flat, barren, with hot, bone dry summers, and "close" to the mountains (i.e. 2 hours to Sequoia from Tulare, 2 hours to Grand Tetons for Idaho Falls.) The Snake River Valley really seemed like a colder version of the Central Valley.
Better question is which state is LEAST like California?

I haven't found a good answer yet but none of the lower 48 states west of the Mississippi seem radically different.
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Old 03-20-2018, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Chicago
6,357 posts, read 6,912,454 times
Reputation: 5732
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
Well, fine, maybe not Hawaii, or the subpolar areas of Alaska. But my point is, California contains all the climate types, accents, food, etc. you'll find in the (mainland) American West.

Eureka has the Marine West Coast, temperate rainforests of Puget Sound. Lassen Volcanic National Park is a mini-Yellowstone, with its many geothermal features. Tahoe rivals Oregon's Crater Lake. Ski resorts in Tahoe and Mammoth are on the scale (size-wise, and snowfall wise) as any resorts in Colorado.

We have the Mojave desert of Vegas, the Sonoran Desert of Arizona, and the rugged Great Basin of Nevada, Utah, and Idaho. We have the 14,000 mountains that rival anything in the rockies. The Bay Area's tech industry and urban hipsterness is the inspiration behind every other liberal bastion in the West from Seattle to Denver.

The entire Western US from SF to Denver and even El Paso speaks with the same American accent, with very little variation (compared to the many dialects of the South or Northeast).

To sum it up, going to other Western states basically felt like California. Seattle? Basically San Francisco with the cold gloominess of Eureka, California. Salt Lake City? Exactly the same as San Bernardino, what with the semi-arid climate, adjacent desert, and mountains, only difference being SLC was more conservative and winters were colder. Idaho Falls? Again, a colder, more conservative (i.e. Mormon) version of Visalia or Tulare. Flat, barren, with hot, bone dry summers, and "close" to the mountains (i.e. 2 hours to Sequoia from Tulare, 2 hours to Grand Tetons for Idaho Falls.) The Snake River Valley really seemed like a colder version of the Central Valley.
What part of the meaning of the word and concept of "californicate" didn't you understand??
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