U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 03-18-2018, 04:36 PM
 
1,504 posts, read 521,825 times
Reputation: 1129

Advertisements

Well, fine, maybe not Hawaii, or the subpolar areas of Alaska. But my point is, California contains all the climate types, accents, food, etc. you'll find in the (mainland) American West.

Eureka has the Marine West Coast, temperate rainforests of Puget Sound. Lassen Volcanic National Park is a mini-Yellowstone, with its many geothermal features. Tahoe rivals Oregon's Crater Lake. Ski resorts in Tahoe and Mammoth are on the scale (size-wise, and snowfall wise) as any resorts in Colorado.

We have the Mojave desert of Vegas, the Sonoran Desert of Arizona, and the rugged Great Basin of Nevada, Utah, and Idaho. We have the 14,000 mountains that rival anything in the rockies. The Bay Area's tech industry and urban hipsterness is the inspiration behind every other liberal bastion in the West from Seattle to Denver.

The entire Western US from SF to Denver and even El Paso speaks with the same American accent, with very little variation (compared to the many dialects of the South or Northeast).

To sum it up, going to other Western states basically felt like California. Seattle? Basically San Francisco with the cold gloominess of Eureka, California. Salt Lake City? Exactly the same as San Bernardino, what with the semi-arid climate, adjacent desert, and mountains, only difference being SLC was more conservative and winters were colder. Idaho Falls? Again, a colder, more conservative (i.e. Mormon) version of Visalia or Tulare. Flat, barren, with hot, bone dry summers, and "close" to the mountains (i.e. 2 hours to Sequoia from Tulare, 2 hours to Grand Tetons for Idaho Falls.) The Snake River Valley really seemed like a colder version of the Central Valley.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-18-2018, 04:52 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,550 posts, read 3,653,233 times
Reputation: 12306
Oh goody... Fasten seatbelts. Something here for everyone.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2018, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Aurora, Colorado
5,441 posts, read 8,144,972 times
Reputation: 4487
Yes. California is the end all and be all of everything
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2018, 05:12 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,550 posts, read 3,653,233 times
Reputation: 12306
So there's nothing unique about California? Who knew?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2018, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Naples Island
1,011 posts, read 639,316 times
Reputation: 2035
Generally speaking, people in California are a lot more open-minded and sociable than people in other Western states.

People in Montana and Wyoming are openly hostile towards transplants, who they perceive as straining their natural resources and threatening their way of life. Those people want you to leave them alone.

Arizona and Nevada are extremely transient in the major metropolitan areas, similar to Florida. Therefore, it is often challenging to befriend others and, more importantly, maintain long-term friendships in those states. It can be very isolating when you befriend someone, and they move away six months later. The extreme summertime heat in Phoenix and, to a lesser extent, Las Vegas and Tucson only compounds the isolation factor, IMO.

Idaho and especially Utah are very Mormon. Because Mormons tend to be very active in their local congregations, and those states tend to be very "homegrown," they only way for you to break into most social circles is to join an LDS church. Also, most Mormons don't drink or smoke, and while I'm not a huge fan of drinking or smoking, those are outlets by which individuals can bond and socialize.

People are quieter and more introverted (i.e., more "bookish") in Oregon and Washington, especially west of the Cascades. Everyone up there seems to be on their own agenda and OK with being alone for a majority of the time. Very different from growing up in Rhode Island or living in Orange County, I'll tell you that much.

I don't know that much about Alaska or New Mexico, but I've met some nice folks from those states. Whites in both states don't seem too radically different from the folks you'd meet on the Plans or in the Upper Midwest.

People in Colorado are very self-absorbed and extremely competitive because it's a very lifestyle-oriented place (more so than California, IMO). They would rather go skiing, snowboarding or mountain-biking than hang out with you. Their sports and hobbies come first, never others.

Finally, people in Hawaii *HATE* white people, and if the Asians in Southern California are any indication, I would venture to guess they're not too crazy about black people, either.

California, FTW.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-19-2018, 05:43 AM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,721 posts, read 9,018,166 times
Reputation: 11083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
Generally speaking, people in California are a lot more open-minded and sociable than people in other Western states.

People in Montana and Wyoming are openly hostile towards transplants, who they perceive as straining their natural resources and threatening their way of life. Those people want you to leave them alone.

Arizona and Nevada are extremely transient in the major metropolitan areas, similar to Florida. Therefore, it is often challenging to befriend others and, more importantly, maintain long-term friendships in those states. It can be very isolating when you befriend someone, and they move away six months later. The extreme summertime heat in Phoenix and, to a lesser extent, Las Vegas and Tucson only compounds the isolation factor, IMO.

Idaho and especially Utah are very Mormon. Because Mormons tend to be very active in their local congregations, and those states tend to be very "homegrown," they only way for you to break into most social circles is to join an LDS church. Also, most Mormons don't drink or smoke, and while I'm not a huge fan of drinking or smoking, those are outlets by which individuals can bond and socialize.

People are quieter and more introverted (i.e., more "bookish") in Oregon and Washington, especially west of the Cascades. Everyone up there seems to be on their own agenda and OK with being alone for a majority of the time. Very different from growing up in Rhode Island or living in Orange County, I'll tell you that much.

I don't know that much about Alaska or New Mexico, but I've met some nice folks from those states. Whites in both states don't seem too radically different from the folks you'd meet on the Plans or in the Upper Midwest.

People in Colorado are very self-absorbed and extremely competitive because it's a very lifestyle-oriented place (more so than California, IMO). They would rather go skiing, snowboarding or mountain-biking than hang out with you. Their sports and hobbies come first, never others.

Finally, people in Hawaii *HATE* white people, and if the Asians in Southern California are any indication, I would venture to guess they're not too crazy about black people, either.

California, FTW.
This is all very accurate. Having lived in Montana and Wyoming I can especially vouch for those assessments. Wyoming people are also self absorbed. They will not help anyone out. My question is, do Californians (and those in other western states) have the same attitude toward food as people do in Wyoming and Montana? I have seen so many people in those states act like eating is a shameful thing to do and when it is meal time a major production is done on presenting it, dishing it up, and commenting on it while eating.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-19-2018, 08:28 AM
 
2,727 posts, read 5,146,110 times
Reputation: 1938
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
Idaho and especially Utah are very Mormon. Because Mormons tend to be very active in their local congregations, and those states tend to be very "homegrown," they only way for you to break into most social circles is to join an LDS church. Also, most Mormons don't drink or smoke, and while I'm not a huge fan of drinking or smoking, those are outlets by which individuals can bond and socialize.
Utah is estimated at 63% LDS while Idaho is only 26% LDS. Those numbers may be high because the LDS Church does not remove names of people who leave the church or become inactive.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-19-2018, 08:40 AM
 
321 posts, read 160,297 times
Reputation: 202
Is the entire Southern US essentially Texas expanded?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-19-2018, 08:47 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,226 posts, read 19,525,937 times
Reputation: 12969
I guess the real question is - Does any western state hate to be associated with or influenced by California?

I rather doubt there would be any.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-19-2018, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Naples Island
1,011 posts, read 639,316 times
Reputation: 2035
Quote:
Originally Posted by Syringaloid View Post
Utah is estimated at 63% LDS while Idaho is only 26% LDS. Those numbers may be high because the LDS Church does not remove names of people who leave the church or become inactive.
Idaho is less Mormon than Utah because it receives more transplants from other states, most notably California and Washington, than Utah. However, I dated a guy from Pocatello in the past, and I will have you know the area stretching from Twin Falls to Idaho Falls is, generally speaking, very Mormon.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top