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Old 03-21-2018, 10:01 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,143,293 times
Reputation: 7737

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tman7117 View Post
Wrong. Everyone on LI/NJ at least calls Manhattan the city, and if you are talking about something in any of the other boroughs you'd just say their name.

ex: "Is that restaurant you were talking about in the city?" "No, it's in Queens."


exactly
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Old 03-21-2018, 10:06 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,984 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
is philly the only city without a place called downtown? And do people ever substitute "downtown" for "center city"???

A real mistake when i started this thread. I should have included far more places called the city and made this thread more of a "what do they call it??"
that question was for you obviosly, but i have some others i'll throw out to anybody:

*. Is the place name "washington" ever used in metro dc?

* likewise, is the word "los angeles" ever used in la, la county, or in metro la?

*. And related to the two above, do the various
metro areas use (in spoken language) any of the following: St. Petersburg, indianapolis, philadelphia?



*. There is no place spoken of as "suburban san francisco". Is such true for any other city?

*. how about the word "kansas city". Is it ever used in the metro area or does one always use terms like kcmo and kcks?

*. One, of course can say "new orleans" or "nola". Are there acceptable uses for "no"??

Not about cities, but still "what do theycall it?

*. is it ever appropriate to call these universities by these names (as opposed to the ones in parentheses: Mississippi (ole miss), louisiana state (lsu), pennsylvania state (penn state), pennsylvania (penn), california (cal), missouri (mizzou)?????

*. There is no place name called "new york city". New york is the name for a city, county and state. Is the word new york city ever used in metro new york? Is it ever appropriate to refer to the.
State with buffaalo, albany and syracuse as "new york"?

*. Is the d/fw metro ever called metro dallas" or the dallas area?"

* is "the bay area" the default for the san francisco bay area for virtually anybody outside of florida"????

*. are these terms recognized and used across the nation: Chicagoland, netroplex, research triangle??
1. I dunno, but people here refer to Salt Lake City as "Salt Lake".

2. "Pennsylvania State" is just too long to say. It's always "Penn State".

3. I have no idea where netroplex is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbeauty212 View Post
pittsburgh uses the term "the city" meaning anywhere in the city of pittsburgh proper. "downtown" is used for the central business district. "pittsburgh" is anywhere in allegheny county., some will try to even use "pittsburgh" as a synonym for all of western pennsylvania.

I'm sorry if you live in an outer county you do not live in pittsburgh. You live in pittsburgh metro, outside of pittsburgh, western pa, but you do not live in pittsburgh.

Nyc - inside nyc "the city" means manhattan, outside of the 5 boroughs and "the city" means anywhere in nyc proper.

Philly - center city and downtown are used interchangeably among natives, transplants are strictly center city. Outside philadelphia, people either say center city or philly. Philly uses the term "city" to juxtapose "county", the term "county" is used for any of the collar counties that surround the city of philadelphia.
Being from Beaver County, I always say "suburban Pittsburgh" out here in Colorado when asked where I'm from. Is that OK with you?
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Old 03-21-2018, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Chicago
5,853 posts, read 6,524,415 times
Reputation: 5331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
1. I dunno, but people here refer to Salt Lake City as "Salt Lake".

2. "Pennsylvania State" is just too long to say. It's always "Penn State".

3. I have no idea where netroplex is.



Being from Beaver County, I always say "suburban Pittsburgh" out here in Colorado when asked where I'm from. Is that OK with you?
Oooooops. Metroplex
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Old 03-21-2018, 10:09 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,143,293 times
Reputation: 7737
Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
Is Philly the only city without a place called downtown? And do people ever substitute "Downtown" for "Center City"???

A real mistake when I started this thread. I should have included far more places called the City and made this thread more of a "what do they call it??"
That question was for you obviosly, but I have some others I'll throw out to anybody:

*. Is the place name "Washington" ever used in Metro DC?

* Likewise, is the word "Los Angeles" ever used in LA, LA County, or in Metro LA?

*. And related to the two above, do the various
metro areas use (in spoken language) any of the Following: St. Petersburg, Indianapolis, Philadelphia?



*. There is no place spoken of as "Suburban San Francisco". Is such true for any other city?

*. How about the word "Kansas City". Is it ever used in the metro area or does one always use terms like KCMO and KCKS?

*. One, of course can say "New Orleans" or "NOLA". Are there acceptable uses for "NO"??

Not about cities, but still "what do theycall it?

*. Is it ever appropriate to call these universities by these names (as opposed to the ones in parentheses: Mississippi (Ole Miss), Louisiana State (LSU), Pennsylvania State (Penn State), Pennsylvania (Penn), California (Cal), Missouri (Mizzou)?????

*. There is no place name called "New York City". New York is the name for a city, county and state. Is the word New York City ever used in metro New York? Is it ever appropriate to refer to the.
State with Buffaalo, Albany and Syracuse as "New York"?

*. Is the D/FW metro ever called Metro Dallas" or The Dallas area?"

* is "The Bay Area" the default for the San Francisco Bay Area for virtually anybody outside of Florida"????

*. Are these terms recognized and used across the nation: Chicagoland, Netroplex, Research Triangle??


for Philly it is generally Center City, Downtown, into Philly, or even the city all get used probably am heading Downtown most frequently actually as a reference, whereas if describing as a place and not where going it might more likely be "Center City" or even "Center City Philadelphia (or Philly) we use Philly more often as Philadelphia is quite long to say


On schools for the PA one you described is most common for Penn State or even PSU (even Happy Valley if heading there) to be used (Pennsylvania is also quite long) If just Penn locally or in the state that is U(niv) of P(enn) (which also gets used. Many also use just Wharton if specifically referring to the business school.


In terms of the region for Philly locals will say the Delaware Valley more commonly than the Philly metro unless describing to an outsider where I think we realize Philly metro would be easier to identify if not from the area, among locals De Valley is most common as the regional name




also saw DC as called the district, that seems most common to reference the actual DT


and totally agree on the NYC (Manhattan) reference it means solely Manhattan and below Harlem I believe the others would be called BK, BX, Queens, even Staten Island, not to be confused with "the Island" which would mean most of LI not the Hamptons, BK or Queens




We even used to say we are heading out to the Island when going from Philly to see an "Islanders"/Flyers game in Nassau county on Long Island


I could also make something similar to Jersey


I might say heading over to Jersey (S Jersey) or Up to Jersey (Newark) or down to Jersey the shore/beach or as we say in Philly "goin down da sure" when heading to the S Jersey beaches
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Old 03-21-2018, 10:35 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,984 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
Oooooops. Metroplex
That one I know.
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Old 03-21-2018, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Tampa - St. Louis
1,090 posts, read 1,626,102 times
Reputation: 1508
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
"The City" and "The County" that's pretty much it. I wonder if St Louis doesn't it the same way.
Yes, we have the same dynamic as Baltimore and use the same language. St. Louis City is called the "city", St. Louis County is called the "county", and Metro East/Illinois suburbs are called the "eastside". People also rarely use neighborhood names. They say "north city", "south city", "west county" etc. unless they are asked for specifics.
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Old 03-21-2018, 12:12 PM
 
11,171 posts, read 22,363,867 times
Reputation: 10919
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrooklynJo View Post
So how about the residents that actually live in Chicago? If they are going downtown do they call it downtown or do they call it the city?
If you live in Chicago you say you're going downtown.

If you live in the suburbs people will pretty much only use "city" or "downtown" if they're going into the city limits. I've heard people coming to my house near Wrigley as "I'm going downtown", although "city" is more common. I never hear anyone actually just say "Chicago".

If you live in outlying areas it's just "the city".

Even when I'm back in Iowa visiting family I find myself saying "I'm headed back to the city on Sunday" just out of habit. They all seem to understand.
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Old 03-21-2018, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Greater Boston (Formerly Orlando and New York)
510 posts, read 197,412 times
Reputation: 498
boston we say going in town.
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Old 03-21-2018, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Chicago
5,853 posts, read 6,524,415 times
Reputation: 5331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
If you live in Chicago you say you're going downtown.

If you live in the suburbs people will pretty much only use "city" or "downtown" if they're going into the city limits. I've heard people coming to my house near Wrigley as "I'm going downtown", although "city" is more common. I never hear anyone actually just say "Chicago".

If you live in outlying areas it's just "the city".

Even when I'm back in Iowa visiting family I find myself saying "I'm headed back to the city on Sunday" just out of habit. They all seem to understand.
I wonder if there are people in places that virtually feel like thry're a suburb....I'm thinking of places like Sauganash, Edgebook, Forest Glenn, Edison Park ever speak of "going into the city". I mean, when you think of places like Edison Park and Park Ridge, they seem like similiar communities, although the former is a neighborhood and later a village. And Edison Park was once a village like Pk Ridge...but got annexed.
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Old 03-21-2018, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Chicago
5,853 posts, read 6,524,415 times
Reputation: 5331
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
for Philly it is generally Center City, Downtown, into Philly, or even the city all get used probably am heading Downtown most frequently actually as a reference, whereas if describing as a place and not where going it might more likely be "Center City" or even "Center City Philadelphia (or Philly) we use Philly more often as Philadelphia is quite long to say


On schools for the PA one you described is most common for Penn State or even PSU (even Happy Valley if heading there) to be used (Pennsylvania is also quite long) If just Penn locally or in the state that is U(niv) of P(enn) (which also gets used. Many also use just Wharton if specifically referring to the business school.


In terms of the region for Philly locals will say the Delaware Valley more commonly than the Philly metro unless describing to an outsider where I think we realize Philly metro would be easier to identify if not from the area, among locals De Valley is most common as the regional name




also saw DC as called the district, that seems most common to reference the actual DT


and totally agree on the NYC (Manhattan) reference it means solely Manhattan and below Harlem I believe the others would be called BK, BX, Queens, even Staten Island, not to be confused with "the Island" which would mean most of LI not the Hamptons, BK or Queens




We even used to say we are heading out to the Island when going from Philly to see an "Islanders"/Flyers game in Nassau county on Long Island


I could also make something similar to Jersey


I might say heading over to Jersey (S Jersey) or Up to Jersey (Newark) or down to Jersey the shore/beach or as we say in Philly "goin down da sure" when heading to the S Jersey beaches
Kid Phily.. let me share my theory with you to see if I'm right....Philly is older than New York and once was the largest and most important colonial and then US city. Philly was built from scratch to have a planned and identifiable core, complete with a large central square and four smaller outlying corner ones (though one was turned into a circle)

So Philly was at the cutting edge of American cities and had this easily identifyable and named (Center City) core.

The term "downtown" of course, comes from Lower Manhattan (once the entire city) being "down town". And thus this downtown CBD gave its name to other cities developing their own "downtowns" (which could just as easily be on the north end of the city as the south)

Thus we were left with one outier...Philadelphia. Philly having the oldest core and once the biggest and most important and proudly named from the get go wasnever going to have a "downtown" and forever have its "Center City"

Do you think I'm right on this, KP????
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